How Many "Break In" Rounds for My Mini 30? - Page 2 - Shooting Sports Forum


Ruger Mini-14 and Mini-30 Ruger Mini-14 and Mini-30 family of rifles

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Old 11-03-2013, 14:49   #26
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Originally Posted by Marlin 45 carbine View Post
when first shooting swab the bore with solvent every 20 rounds until you get to 100.
then every 50 shots until 300 rds.
the bore will thank you for this.
Can this potentially really make a difference? What's the rationale? i.e. how does it specifically help the bore? How much of a "swab" (once/twice through?) Do you swab and then run a dry patch?

TIA

John
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Old 11-03-2013, 22:01   #27
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Originally Posted by milspecnsn View Post
Can this potentially really make a difference? What's the rationale? i.e. how does it specifically help the bore? How much of a "swab" (once/twice through?) Do you swab and then run a dry patch?

TIA

John
Its an aspect of barrel break-in.

Steel at the microscopic level is crystalline and fibrous. It may look smooth to the naked eye but its really not. The same applies to the surface of an unfired barrel.

When a round of ammunition is fired in that barrel, those fibers get ground down and pressed into the voids and holes in the direction that the bullet gets fired. At the point all the fibers and voids are evened out the barrel is broken in.

The problem is that fouling from burned powder, primer residue, bits of bullet jacket and lead also get into those voids and under the fibers, causing uneven points of friction, interference with the gas seal, robbing accuracy.
It also extends the time to proper barrel break in.

The sooner and more frequently fouling is removed during the break in process, the better.

I would run one wet, wait a minute or two for the solvent to do its work, then two dry patches to make sure the solvent doesn't interfere with the process either.
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Old 11-04-2013, 13:40   #28
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Originally Posted by jor-el View Post
Its an aspect of barrel break-in.

Steel at the microscopic level is crystalline and fibrous. It may look smooth to the naked eye but its really not. The same applies to the surface of an unfired barrel.

When a round of ammunition is fired in that barrel, those fibers get ground down and pressed into the voids and holes in the direction that the bullet gets fired. At the point all the fibers and voids are evened out the barrel is broken in.

The problem is that fouling from burned powder, primer residue, bits of bullet jacket and lead also get into those voids and under the fibers, causing uneven points of friction, interference with the gas seal, robbing accuracy.
It also extends the time to proper barrel break in.

The sooner and more frequently fouling is removed during the break in process, the better.

I would run one wet, wait a minute or two for the solvent to do its work, then two dry patches to make sure the solvent doesn't interfere with the process either.
Jo-rel


Thank you for the explanation. Makes sense
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Old 11-04-2013, 14:49   #29
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Zondfive,

Thank you for sharing your experiences. I'll pass on the stoning suggestion as I don't feel comfortable doing it. But on the brass catcher...got it in the mail today.
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Old 11-11-2013, 17:25   #30
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Get about 500 rounds and go shoot the hell out of it. let it heat and cool down a bit for a few cycles. Swabbing the barrel occasionally sounds like a good idea. Have fun.
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Old 11-18-2013, 04:53   #31
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Originally Posted by Painfulitchingandswelling View Post
Get about 500 rounds and go shoot the hell out of it. let it heat and cool down a bit for a few cycles. Swabbing the barrel occasionally sounds like a good idea. Have fun.
Pain- are you the guy selling ammo to this guy? HA! Lots easier on the bore to just stone around till things are smooth - but I already said that

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Old 11-18-2013, 06:58   #32
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...and the OP just said he's not yet comfortable stoning any parts.

PIaS does have a point. Some decent ammo and a cleaning kit are all that's really needed to break in a Mini.

Besides that, running a couple/few hundred rounds through a Mini gives you an opportunity to work on your technique. Don't just go and do mag dumps (that is a true waste of money), actually sit down and sight-in your irons and/or optic. Then work on your breathing, trigger squeeze, etc.

300 or so rounds will go faster than you think, and you'll be a better shooter than you were when you first sat down.
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Old 11-18-2013, 07:08   #33
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Originally Posted by COBrien View Post
My 580 Mini-14 became 100% reliable after about 300 rounds.

Stoning the mating surfaces of sliding parts isn't a bad idea, but the rifle will break itself in, i.e., the parts will wear to match one another, in short order.

I noticed, though, that the majority of my reliability issues early on were magazine-related. My Ruger 5-rounder wasn't really an issue, but the Ruger 20-rounder was. Borrowing a friend's heavily-used Ruger 20-round magazine did away with most of my FTFeed malfunctions.
Same here, Mine was good to go after about 3-400 rounds and other then a couple of magazine related issues my only other failures were self induced. At a carbine course I took I kept getting the op-rod up against the left barricade when I was shooting around it and it caused me a few problems, but it was actually a good clearing drill.

With the Mini platform and most all semi autos, handgun or rifle I am a believer in letting the gun were itself in by shooting. I know its expensive with the cost of ammo but I believe its the best way. About the only time I take a stone to a part is when its a part that needs fitting.

On another note with breaking in a rifle. I'm an Enfield guy, I own a few and they are all shooters. A few years back I bought a couple No4 MK2's that were new in the mummy wrap, both cleaned up real nice and the one that I shoot the most is just now getting broken in and getting scary accurate.
tri70 and passtime like this.
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