Numrich Shipping Curved Mini Metal Butt Plates - Shooting Sports Forum


Ruger Mini-14 and Mini-30 Ruger Mini-14 and Mini-30 family of rifles

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Old 08-01-2020, 09:38   #1
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Numrich Shipping Curved Mini (And Others) Metal Butt Plates

Might be old news, but just received a Stainless Steel Mini-14 Butt plate. https://www.gunpartscorp.com/products/1513880B.

Bright stainless steel, but a user can "rough" it up with appropriate sandpaper, and paint/coat it, if desired. Nice quality, and the "wordy" instructions cover all fitting eventualities. Comes with 2 stainless steel washers, and a rubber "spacer' pad/sheet, but no screws.

Note that this item is also available in blue. Also interesting is that there are a number of these butt plates, all with different product numbers, which are supposed to fit "10/22, Mini-14, Mini-30, 44 Carbine & No. 3 Carbine"

No idea if this will fit any syn stocks, nor any idea if any syn stocks can be re-worked to accept the item.

Like I said, possibly old news. These things come and go, AFAIK, and glad I finally got a decent one, with very complete instructions. YMMV.

Disclaimer: no financial interest.
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Old 08-05-2020, 10:36   #2
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Probably won't fit the synthetic stocks, as they all seem to have a flat butt-end (not curved). I have no problem with the plastic ones (more original for a 181), but good to know Numrich has metal ones for the earlier model stocks. Thanks for the post!
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Old 08-05-2020, 14:54   #3
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Originally Posted by RJF View Post
Probably won't fit the synthetic stocks, as they all seem to have a flat butt-end (not curved). I have no problem with the plastic ones (more original for a 181), but good to know Numrich has metal ones for the earlier model stocks. Thanks for the post!
One reason for installing a metal butt-plate onto an early stock is to save the OEM, fragile, plastic butt-plate from being damaged during use. Plastic is very hard to repair, once damaged. Older plastic butt-plates might not have the modern, required, molded-in description of the plastic which modern plastic butt-plates are required to display. In short, your Older, unblemished, and unmarked plastic butt plate might be easily distinguishable to a savvy collector, and [i]might[/] be worth more than you think, to a collector. There is no telling what a collector will pay.

Besides, very early stocks had, if I am not mistaken, metal butt-plates, and the plastic versions were offered on later stocks as a cost-savings measure. Generally speaking, plastic is seldom a good replacement for metal, and in the case of butt-plates, a completely inadequate replacement, if it ever comes to giving a proper butt-stroke.

YMMV, of course.
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Old 08-05-2020, 15:51   #4
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Originally Posted by RJF View Post
Probably won't fit the synthetic stocks, as they all seem to have a flat butt-end (not curved). I have no problem with the plastic ones (more original for a 181), but good to know Numrich has metal ones for the earlier model stocks. Thanks for the post!
There have been threads about using 1903 Springfield butt plates in conjunction with some Ruger flat-butt wooden stocks. Naturally, this means modifying the butt-plate to fit the flat wooden stock.

It might also be possible to modify some flat-butted syn stocks to accept the 1903 Springfield metal butt-plate. Cutting-down the butt plate to match the stock, inletting the stock to accept the butt-plate, and adding some high-strength epoxy as a reinforcement for the screws which attach the butt-plate to the stock seems do-able.

The trap-door on the Springfield butt plate can allow the user to have all sorts of cleaning gear/spare parts stored within the butt stock.

I've been storing emergency spare parts/cleaning kits within ostensibly "hollow" butt stocks for a very long time. Not my original idea, but just following the ideas of others. YMMV
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Old 08-05-2020, 17:06   #5
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They've gone up about ten bucks or so since I bought mine a few years ago. I'm still torn between the steel butt plate and the Choate rubber pad. It's nice to have both so I can change my mind all I want.
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Old 08-05-2020, 17:50   #6
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Originally Posted by Beck View Post
They've gone up about ten bucks or so since I bought mine a few years ago. I'm still torn between the steel butt plate and the Choate rubber pad. It's nice to have both so I can change my mind all I want.
I've never thought either the 5,56 AR or the Mini platforms to have significant recoil. YMMV. Jeff Cooper once opined that perceived recoil was about 80% mental. I concur.

That said, there is the aspect of muzzle rise during rapid fire, and the A2 muzzle device does appear to reduce such muzzle rise, while significantly reducing muzzle flash.

Read the linked tests, and decide for yourselves. If anyone can provide links to better tests, please post them!
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Old 08-05-2020, 18:06   #7
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Originally Posted by RIBob View Post
I've never thought either the 5,56 AR or the Mini platforms to have significant recoil. YMMV. Jeff Cooper once opined that perceived recoil was about 80% mental. I concur.

That said, there is the aspect of muzzle rise during rapid fire, and the A2 muzzle device does appear to reduce such muzzle rise, while significantly reducing muzzle flash.

Read the linked tests, and decide for yourselves. If anyone can provide links to better tests, please post them!
That's especially true with the Mini-30. The recoil is very mild. The Choate pad gives me about 3/4" more length of pull, which suits my frame, and takes felt recoil down to basically none. Considering the first long gun I ever shot was my grandfather's Remington Model 29 12 GA when I was 10 years old, recoil has never bothered me. I got over the fear all of a sudden. Well, I guess the first long gun I ever shot was a Winchester Model 190 22LR, but that doesn't count in terms of recoil.
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Old 08-06-2020, 11:59   #8
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I'm speaking to the natural and normal fit and function: mostly to the shape of the stock to receive a butt-plate for a curved butt-stock as found on the original Mini-14 stocks. Metal or plastic is a fair discussion for the earlier stocks. Anything other seems to drift from the original post, IMHO...But a good conversation as I have a few newer Minis and stocks with a flat butt. Would love to convert one of them to a close semblance to a true Mini-14 as COSteve did.
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Old 08-06-2020, 13:23   #9
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Originally Posted by RJF View Post
I'm speaking to the natural and normal fit and function: mostly to the shape of the stock to receive a butt-plate for a curved butt-stock as found on the original Mini-14 stocks. Metal or plastic is a fair discussion for the earlier stocks. Anything other seems to drift from the original post, IMHO...But a good conversation as I have a few newer Minis and stocks with a flat butt. Would love to convert one of them to a close semblance to a true Mini-14 as COSteve did.
I prefer the older stocks with the curved end as well. The Choate rubber pad preserves the curve and extends the length of pull while virtually eliminating felt recoil. It's a relevant third option, if you can find one. unfortunately it's another of those useful Mini accessories that's been discontinued.

There are still similar looking available, branded John Mason or unbranded. They extend the length of pull, but are hard as a rock. The Choate is the one to have if you wanted something other than the factory plastic or aftermarket steel plate, which some people do. They used to be fairly popular when all Minis had curved butt. I still have my original plastic butt plate in my spare parts box, so I'm all set to use any of the three.

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Old 08-06-2020, 17:40   #10
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I absolutely love the factory wood with a curved butt plate, but I wouldn't trade my factory synthetic for one.
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Old 08-06-2020, 20:17   #11
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Originally Posted by r80rt View Post
I absolutely love the factory wood with a curved butt plate, but I wouldn't trade my factory synthetic for one.
I like the synthetic too. I'd probably ruin one trying to hack it up for a curved butt plate. That's the rub So for now it's wood for me.
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Old 08-07-2020, 04:51   #12
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If I thought I could put a curved butt plate on a synthetic stock I'd give it a try. But I know it ain't gonna happen. So for me, It's function over form.
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Old 08-07-2020, 05:10   #13
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All this talk about curved butts has got me thinking about Olivia Wilde.......
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Old 08-07-2020, 06:54   #14
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Originally Posted by r80rt View Post
If I thought I could put a curved butt plate on a synthetic stock I'd give it a try. But I know it ain't gonna happen. So for me, It's function over form.
I have heard of some folks using (apparently relatively cheap and plentiful) '03 Springfield metal butt plates on straight-butted syn and wooden stocks. Some even drill-out the wooden stocks, and install a GI metal/plastic tube for a cleaning kit that was used/issued with such rifles.

'03/Garand plastic oiler/pull-through tube: https://www.gunpartscorp.com/products/1049670

'03 flatt butt plates and screws (Please view all 3 pages): https://www.gunpartscorp.com/search#...20butt%20plate

By all means, do look around at alternative vendors.

Hardest part of altering the butt of most stocks is to make the finished cut square to the vertical centerline of the rifle stock. Trace the desired cut line on both sides of the uncut stock, cut long, and file to fit. Check squareness by measuring from identical points on cut line on either side of the stock to some appropriate measuring end point, possibly the holes for the screws for the stock reinforcement. Time-consuming, but not terribly difficult, as long as one takes care in the initial set-up/marking. Of course, such mods to an OEM Ruger wooden stock will likely have negative impact on any future collectability. Might also be true in the case of some rare syn stocks. Suggest it is a very good idea to practice on a bit of scrap lumber, like a small section of 2x4.

Plumber's epoxy putty, installed on roughened-up areas on the inside of hollow syn stock, will provide something for the butt plate screws to fasten-to, and should do the trick. Locate where the additional Plumber's epoxy putty will be needed, emplace it, and use the buttplate to press-in the rear surface of the epoxy. If a mistake is made (Putty sets-up quickly after mixing), then use a dremel to remove whatever is required, leave a very rough surface, and apply a little more epoxy putty. Drill a properly-sized hole for the screw(s), and that's it.

I haven't done this exact operation myself, but I've used epoxy plumber's putty for similar screw reinforcement purposes. I've also cut-down some wooden stocks, and installed butt pads.

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Old 08-07-2020, 07:45   #15
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Originally Posted by sandog View Post
All this talk about curved butts has got me thinking about Olivia Wilde.......
Women are like wild horses, wonderful exotic creatures. I can watch them for hours, but I don't want one loose in my house.
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Old 08-07-2020, 11:34   #16
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Originally Posted by Bepe View Post
As stated...the rear of the Ruger syn stock is hollow. There is webbing that holds the butt pad mounting screws. Very doubtful that you would find a pad with the screw holes in the identical place. Yes you could try to drill new ones but extra holes would look bubba. Also the chance of getting the pad seated properly and the holes lined up perfectly is next to none.

Alter the stock by cutting it down and you have now cut into the webbing and screw socket, reducing it in length. Haven't had mine off in a bit so I forget how much is there but IIRC it isn't much.

I cut off the wood stock on my 583 series Mini 14 and it came out perfect. I wouldn't attempt to alter the poly stock.

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Owners/users will need to decide whether any of these butt plate substitutions/mods are worth the time/expense/trouble.

There are valid reasons for NOT doing so; There is no way I would alter my OEM curved butt wooden stock in order to install a flat '03 metal butt plate, nor would I alter my OEM wooden flat stock (if I had one) to accept a curved butt plate. OTOH, I would have no reservations about altering a spare wooden stock. YMMV.

Modifying any stock to accept a different style of metal butt plate has its' challenges; Some types of stocks more than others. While the project will be challenging, that is not to say it is impossible, nor even extremely difficult, given a little practice on spare wood.

People's skills, needs, and inclinations will necessarily vary. All of us are different.

When I was much younger, I bought a bunch of very beat-up wooden stocks for next to nothing. I practiced inletting them, deliberately breaking them in order to learn how to glue them back together, and many other things. Many folks don't have this peculiar skill set, and are-- quite reasonably-- unwilling to experiment on their perfectly good stock. In their shoes, I wouldn't do so either; that would be begging for trouble.

Please forgive me if I have seemed to minimize the difficulties of modifying stocks. It is my mistake for speaking from a personal point of view, and neglecting that others have very different experiences. While having a certain amount of experience in modding stocks, I am by no means an Expert, and I understand-- and concur with -- the very natural and reasonable inclination of many people to be reluctant to mod a perfectly good, functional stock.

Again, my apologies for momentarily forgetting myself. And further apologies for being wordy--it's a regrettable failure on my part.

As it is, my Mini is in a carefully-bedded Butler Creek folder, so I have no plans concerning any sort of buttstock mods, other than fitting the recently bought curved metal buttplate to my OEM, curved wooden stock. Just Because. I'll carefully wrap the unmolested, OEM, curved plastic butt plate in bubble wrap, and store it with the wooden stock.
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Old 08-07-2020, 11:45   #17
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With poly, it best to just run it. I did take the thick putt pads off and belt sand them down 1/4 inch, it helps with my stubby arms.
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Old 08-07-2020, 12:23   #18
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Originally Posted by r80rt View Post
With poly, it best to just run it. I did take the thick putt pads off and belt sand them down 1/4 inch, it helps with my stubby arms.
If I may offer a suggestion, buy some Stainless Steel Phillips head screws with identical threads compared to OEM screws. Should be easy enough, as the OEM butt plate screws are wood screws.

Once back home, screw the screws into a piece of wood, so they are adequately secured. Using a cutting wheel on a Dremel tool, carefully cut a full-width notch into one of the Phillips head sets of slots. Right across the full head of the screw. Buy extra, plain steel (cheaper) screws for practice.

You have now made a screw that can be removed/installed with with either a flat head screwdriver, or a Phillips head screwdriver.

Bonus points if the screw head is sufficiently large enough to allow a common dime to be used. Most often, this requires some careful filing with a jeweler's file.

This way, you will almost certainly have a tool on you that will allow access to the hollow butt stock.

May I also suggest that the hollow butt stock is an ideal place to store spare parts/tools/cleaning kits/cleaning supplies, and many other things.

Why do this? Aside for the obvious utility of having always having spare parts/tools that can never be left behind/forgotten, there is also the factor of the balance of the Mini to consider.

In his book "Testing the War Weapons, Timothy Mullin makes note of the most useful combat weapons being rather "Muzzle-Light", as opposed to Muzzle-heavy, which is more useful on the Target Range.

https://smile.amazon.com/Testing-War...6827699&sr=8-2

This one of my "Top Ten" Firearms books. YMMV

Carefully stashing stiff into the hollow butt stock adds weight, but more importantly, changes the center of gravity of the rifle in a useful way if one is shooting on a 2-way range. Users of Scout-type optics, which tend to move the rifle's center of gravity forward should take note.

Nobody likes to add weight to their rifle, but at least one has the option to add useful weight where it can actually help. The added mass will also serve to reduce felt recoil.

Sorry for being wordy. Got carried away
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