question on the mini14 bolt movement - Shooting Sports Forum


Ruger Mini-14 and Mini-30 Ruger Mini-14 and Mini-30 family of rifles

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Old 03-31-2020, 07:47   #1
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question on the mini14 bolt movement

hi guys

i am trying to understand why the bolt goes backwards at an angle in the receiver , like the rear of the bolt goes down. the M1 and the M14 does the same, but i cant find a reason for it. is it to help extraction? does it help feeding? does it help the compression of the main spring via the hammer? is it to reduce the height of the rear of the receiver?
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Old 03-31-2020, 08:14   #2
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My thought is to keep the rear sight low, and consequently the front sight, as well. When the line of sight gets too far above the bore centerline, zeroing can be an issue. Also, the Garand and M14 were designed as battle rifles, to be produced during times of war, An ounce or two of steel may not sound like much, but when they are making millions of rifles, it adds up to a lot of strategic material.
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Old 03-31-2020, 14:49   #3
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it's to cock the hammer back. Look at your diagram, do to design of the hammer the bolt would have to angle down to fully push the hammer back.
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Old 03-31-2020, 18:11   #4
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that, too!
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Old 04-01-2020, 01:39   #5
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Originally Posted by James T. Kirk View Post
it's to cock the hammer back. Look at your diagram, do to design of the hammer the bolt would have to angle down to fully push the hammer back.
yeah, I am going to go witth that. I wasn't sure it was the reason as the hammer goes way down past the sears, but I found a similar question on an another forum, the guy contacted Fulton armory and he got that same answer. thank you.
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Old 04-02-2020, 10:55   #6
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Originally Posted by Helmut111 View Post
I wasn't sure it was the reason as the hammer goes way down past the sears,
Well that diagram is not true to measurement. I do believe the sears contact closer than the picture shows. There are a lot of things wrong with that picture as far as a true diagram of a half cut Mini 14. The head of the receiver where the barrel screws in should be thicker and rounder. The top leaves of the receiver the bolt rides under should be thicker. Gas piston is too large and slide assembly is to small. The gas block is all wrong, and ect. But as far as function of the action, its a accurate representation. The pivot point of the hammer in the trigger group does have to compress at a steep angle. So, the bolt would have to fallow suit to keep contact with the hammer to fully compress it pass the sears.
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Old 04-02-2020, 11:02   #7
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We would have to ask Mr. Garrand.
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Old 04-02-2020, 22:52   #8
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On firing, the hammer is captive in the rear of the bolt because of the bolt locking cam on the hammer nose. As the hammer pivots about its pin in an arc, drawing the hammer nose down as it goes back, the bolt needs to follow the hammer nose down until they are free of each other.

Making the receiver smaller and lower seems to be the other reasons for this slope. As does, running the bolt against the ceiling of the open bottom receiver for the sake of stability of an otherwise rather sloppy sliding fit on firing. How the bolt face (or edge) meets the top round in the mag to strip it into the chamber may be another reason.

I tried to ask various M14 manufacturers this question years ago, but they were not very friendly in their response. Some ignored me. Others accused me of wanting to steal manufacturing know-how...
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