Making My Own 300 Blackout Brass - Shooting Sports Forum


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Old 06-18-2013, 07:31   #1
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Making My Own 300 Blackout Brass

Reloading metallic cartridges can be both personally and financially rewarding. By following some simple guidelines you’ll be able to make usable ammunition for a fraction of what they cost new.

I’m building a new rifle and have elected the 300 Blackout as the chambering. Although I have several parts on order, many are still listed as “out of stock” which means the build will take longer than anticipated. Like many of the parts I need ammunition is also scarce so making usable ammunition for the 300 Blackout will require a bit more ingenuity.

The 300 Blackout was developed on the 5.56 / .223 Remington which means if you have some 5.56 / .223 Remington brass you can create the 300 Blackout cartridge but it’ll take a lot more initial work.

It’s been a while but I dug through my supply of brass and discovered that I have about 4,000 pristine once fired cases both military 5.56 Lake City and commercial .223 Remington with a Black Hills Match head stamp. Thinking back I had been buying brass on EBay when it was permitted and amassed quite a supply!

Here are the steps I took in order

1. Brass selection
2. Inspect
3. Trim
4. De-burr
5. De-cap
6. Tumble
7. Swage primer pocket to remove crimp
8. Lubricate
9. Form
10. Measure basic features
11. Case trim to length
12. De-burr case mouth
13. Measure Overall Length

For this exercise I chose to use some of my military 5.56 Lake City brass. Military brass is great brass to reuse because it’s heavier and has only been fired once. The downside to military brass is it’s thicker so my starting charge will need to be about 2 grains less and the primers are crimped and I’ll have to deal with that.

Military Stash



Rough Trimming

Trimming was quick and painless. Since a cartridge case is little more than a thin walled brass tube, a high tooth count carbide tipped blade on my table saw makes short work of trimming. I set up a fixed stop in order to keep the trim length consistent. In the photo I'm wearing a Kevlar glove. While this glove offers little protection from the saw blade, it will protect my fingers from any brass chips flying around.





Cleaning

Once I had about 100 trimmed, I de-primed then toss the lot into my tumbler for about 2 hours. I want to be certain that the brass case is as clean and smooth as possible to avoid any damage to my new Redding dies... Prior to forming I de-burred the rough burr from the Rough Trimming stage.

Ready for Forming

Before I ran these cases into the sizing / forming die I sprayed them with Hornady's One Shot lubricant. I like this because it's light and leaves a film inside and outside.





Formed



Trim to Length







Once the Trim to Length step was complete I had to de-burr the case mouths. I ended up removing about 0.020 to the burr and debris pile was much more than normal.

Measure

My vernier shows the cartridge length to be just under 1.360, I'll take it!



Complete





Sequential Steps



Enjoy!
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Old 06-18-2013, 09:18   #2
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Very nice! I would like to learn how to reload one day.
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Old 06-18-2013, 10:08   #3
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Originally Posted by MiamiE View Post
Very nice! I would like to learn how to reload one day.
Reloading metallic cartridges is very easy once you understand the steps and theory behind it, and that in itself is super easy!

Pick up a reloading manual. In the front there's always a section on the How To's of reloading. Following this step by step procedure will give you the necessary basics behind reloading and then the sky's the limit only set by you..

Lyman has always offered one of the easiest and most complete reloading manuals and for about $25.00 you'll have it forever..
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Old 06-18-2013, 10:26   #4
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I hear ya. I will pick up the book just scared of blowing up my hands with a load thats too hot!
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Old 06-18-2013, 11:09   #5
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Originally Posted by MiamiE View Post
I hear ya. I will pick up the book just scared of blowing up my hands with a load thats too hot!
All of the information contained within commercially available loading manuals meet SAAMI guidelines. Always begin using the recommended starting powder charge and work up from there..

  1. Get a good understanding of the basics
  2. Follow all the safety tips
  3. Never work distracted
  4. Check everything twice
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