the MSS sucks. 12 lbs, bulky, needs 3 lbs of parka - Shooting Sports Forum


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Old 04-03-2020, 05:05   #1
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the MSS sucks. 12 lbs, bulky, needs 3 lbs of parka

1/2 lb of bugnet, a lb of poncho. a lb of hammock. Remove the 6 lbs of winter sleeping bag, brings things down to 11 lbs, but its then limited to 30F degrees, without a fire. I can do better with 5 lbs of shelter/sleep element and clothing.
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Old 06-28-2020, 19:14   #2
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you'll never get ultra-light trail-blazer gear for less than an arm & leg......unless you gather your own individual items for your "set".....but even that can be scarily expensive.......
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Old 06-29-2020, 03:30   #3
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I made miy own. . If you have a used, $30 sewing machine to add the zippers, you can get set up for $200 or less. If you can do without the zippers, you can get set up for $150. i made my setup out of bugnetting, 3 of the SOL mylar bivvies, used in a certain way, drumliners and a big hunk of monofilament netting, which I made into a hammock, with muletape as treestraps. The zipper let you wear the bags as ponchos, but you could use blue masking tape instead. My setup is not the most durable, but given some repair-tape, and care in its use, it'll get you thru at least 60 days. In 60 days, you can walk or raft out of cold country, or find all sort of gear beside dead people, if it's shtf. In warm climates, people have lived for millennia with almost no gear at all, especially not shelter gear or clothing.

You have to have the "breathable" SOL mylar Escape Lite inside of the "non breathable 2 person Emergency bivvy. with both tented over a ridgeline, to form a layer of dead air, The Escape is too small for a big man. Everywhere you let it touch you, other than under you, is a cold spot. So I bought two of them, cut one in half lengthwise and assembled it to the other one with 100 mph tape. This handles 40F just fine, in just your cammies, laying on a drum liner stuffed with dry debris. The hammock offers the ability to get up in the breezes for hot weaher, and up out of the water, mud, bugs, snakes, etc. The bugnet bags and the net-hammock can become insulation, if wrapped around you, under your cammies, ideally, with bits of debris between each wrap, so that the netting can' t press tight down upon itself. The debris need not be all that dry, cause your body heat will soon dry it out if it's damp. The 3 drum liners cant be wrapped around you in the same way, one around each leg , one around your torso/butt. I use two packs, a buttpack and a day pack. The shelter/sleep gear is folded up and rolled up, then stuffed between the packs and tied in place. Then it acts as a pack frame, moving the weight of the daypack to my hip belt. The zipper pounches that hold my spare t shirt and boxers form the padding on the hip belt while the spare socks pad the shoulder straps.,
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Old 06-29-2020, 05:06   #4
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I mostly test sleeping gear in the back of my mini-van with both side doors left open. :-) Then I can try this or that swiftly, use the net to find out the temps, wind speed, humidity, record it all easily, etc. Given the wind here, it still rains on you when in the van, with the doors wide open. A helluva lot of what guys "think" is shelter/sleep gear aint worth a hoot in the wind and rain, at 34F, I promise you that. When normal sleeping bags get wet, they are worse than worthless. They weigh 40 lbs and soak everything else that comes even close to them. You aint gonna dry them out in one day in the field, either. Also, all summer long, all of that weight and bulk is useless. if shtf, where will you store it, to protect it from moisture-rot, rodents and insects?
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Old 06-29-2020, 23:27   #5
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my "modern" trekking days were 20 yrs ago when a 40 lb long-hike rig was considered optimal.
now, any trekking I do is "Pioneer" style....not as eco-friendly but lighter and more fun.
I generally keep it to day trips now though.
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Old 07-01-2020, 12:08   #6
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today, i'd either hold it to 25 lbs or put the load on a bicycle and walk alongside of it.
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Old 07-02-2020, 22:56   #7
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much of my old trekking areas were so wild that even a mule would have trouble footing it....a horse would die quickly and a bicycle wasn't even in the equation.........
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