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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
How many people here are self made Millionaires? I am curious how you became wealthy. I have heard some interesting stories in my time. We all learn from each other.

I was raised in a poor home with very caring parents. For a time, I lived in the back of my truck in a creek bed while I was searching for employment. I started working at animal kennel and on a ranch cutting firewood until I had enough money to send myself to college. I did college for two years, then signed up. I applied to become a Law enforcement officer. I spent a whole career as a Law enforcement officer (28 years) during that time I socked away money into a 457 plan and invested wisely in real estate. At the age of 32 I owned four homes. While still a cop, I started another business. I promoted as far I felt comfortable, worked lots of overtime, and saved! I am now retired and continue my real estate investments. I own a cattle ranch, three homes, a commercial business and building, and enjoy the fruits of my hard work.

I made it on my own. Never took a handout. NEVER! I put myself through school and got my Bachelors degree, then Masters without any debt. I worked my ass off for everything I have. Since I was so blessed by my own ambition and success, I shared this with many wounded combat warriors and their families. I have seen a lot of tragedy in life, had a few failures and recovered, and always looked forward, never backwards.

Truly from rags to riches without any government assistance or debt. Everything I own is paid off. Much of my success I attribute to paying attention to Dave Ramsey! He is a financial guru! Hard work pays off. Charity is for those who need it most and least expect it! No free handouts to just anyone. Everything must be earned, including respect!

God Bless this great country of the United States. The USA is the best on earth. Anyone who says otherwise is a spoiled lazy useless punk.
 

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I'm working on my second million (gave up on my first million).:cool:

Our financial advisor visited today. He mentioned off-highhandedly we have a bit over a million in investments and annuities and IRAs. Of course, all of that can change in a minute, but he blessedly guided us into some secure investments when we could afford to invest in them them and they've done well over the past decade+.

Nothing special here: an Army career officer, mostly as a bachelor, who drove 20-year-old cars and didn't bother with extravagant things. When I retired from the Army, I joined a good company that appreciated my very special skills and paid me well for 14 years. I maxxed out company Employee Stock Purchase Plans and 401Ks. Saved most of that money, and still our newest cars are 16+ years old, which we seldom drive except for medical appointments. Paid off mortgages as soon as I could and now live mortgage-free, with no car payments. Between my wife and me, Army retirement and So-So Security and an annuity payout for her bring us monthly income far more than we would ever spend. All that "investment" stuff just sits there, un-touched and unlikely to ever be needed, but grows each year, at a low-risk.

One could not tell "we are millionaires", because we don't act that way or spend that way. I suspect our neighbors are similarly set - but you wouldn't know it. We still eat chicken far more than beef, and steaks are rare. We don't "do" things like cruises or vacations, but - as always - prefer the solitude of our farm with the critters than inhabit it. The house needs a new deck and some of the fence-line needs work. We'll get around to it at some point...and never dip into our investments.

We are living the dream of a full and comfortable retirement - mostly because we didn't spend exorbitantly in our younger years and got used to it, but rather set aside everything we could afford to live this life we are now living.
 

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Yeah, a million is not what it used to be, that's for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm working on my second million (gave up on my first million).:cool:

Our financial advisor visited today. He mentioned off-highhandedly we have a bit over a million in investments and annuities and IRAs. Of course, all of that can change in a minute, but he blessedly guided us into some secure investments when we could afford to invest in them them and they've done well over the past decade+.

Nothing special here: an Army career officer, mostly as a bachelor, who drove 20-year-old cars and didn't bother with extravagant things. When I retired from the Army, I joined a good company that appreciated my very special skills and paid me well for 14 years. I maxxed out company Employee Stock Purchase Plans and 401Ks. Saved most of that money, and still our newest cars are 16+ years old, which we seldom drive except for medical appointments. Paid off mortgages as soon as I could and now live mortgage-free, with no car payments. Between my wife and me, Army retirement and So-So Security and an annuity payout for her bring us monthly income far more than we would ever spend. All that "investment" stuff just sits there, un-touched and unlikely to ever be needed, but grows each year, at a low-risk.

One could not tell "we are millionaires", because we don't act that way or spend that way. I suspect our neighbors are similarly set - but you wouldn't know it. We still eat chicken far more than beef, and steaks are rare. We don't "do" things like cruises or vacations, but - as always - prefer the solitude of our farm with the critters than inhabit it. The house needs a new deck and some of the fence-line needs work. We'll get around to it at some point...and never dip into our investments.

We are living the dream of a full and comfortable retirement - mostly because we didn't spend exorbitantly in our younger years and got used to it, but rather set aside everything we could afford to live this life we are now living.
My experience has been that most wealthy people are not the snobs most would think. Where I live in Montana, there are multi millionaires who are mostly modest and a normal subset of the average person. Money did not change them as it did not change me. We are no different and hang with people from all walks of life. Most of my pals are blue collar guys and military vets. No one talks big money and we find our best times around a fire pit, BBQ, in the machine shop, riding motorcycle tending to the cattle, fishing, hunting, or out cutting wood.
 
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