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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy,

I've been thinking of swapping the wood stock on my 583 for a factory Ruger synthetic. I have read some specs but wanted to get some specific info from guys who have installed them.

First, I read that the metal mag well reinforcement is not carried over. Is this correct?
Also, I read that you must take the metal forearm shield out of the old wood stock and transplant it in the new one? Is that also correct? According to Ruger, it's a bit lighter than the wood stock. Does it feel lighter?

One more.. in pics, it looks like the butt on the factory black stock is ribbed, unlike the spongy rubber butt on the factory wood stocks. Is it rubber or harder plastic? I'd love to hear any opinions of the butt pad and the stock in general.

Thanks, in advance, for your help.

Peace.
 

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Ruger factory synthetic stock does not need metal mag well reinforcement. The metal forearm shield used in synthetic stock is the same as the one used in wood stock. Buttstock on synthetic stock is made of rubber.
 

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I have fitted metal stock reinforcements in wooden stocks to existing barreled actions, always with good results. Some syn stocks do not require the metal stock reinforcement, but some do. In that case, fitting the metal stock reinforcement to the barreled action is called-for.

Not sure why fitting the metal stock reinforcement to the barreled action is such an obscure topic, but seems to be so.

Simple enough; Just file-down the metal stock reinforcement so that there is, ideally, zero clearance between the stock reinforcement and the "legs" of the barreled action. Easy as that.

Note that this practice is only valid for a particular action being inserted into a stock/reinforcement bracket intended for such. With an entirely different barreled action, I would expect the stock reinforcement to be modified differently, and so made to fit, uniquely, for that particular barreled action. IOW, each modified stock reinforcement, in a given stock, will only fit a particular barreled action for which it is fitted.

Whether or not a metal stock reinforcement is present in a given stock, the fitment of any stock, particularly ill-fitting , OEM wooden stocks, can be improved, usually by a simple shimming of the sides of the barreled action within the stock.

I do not usually suggest 'bedding" the Mini action onto a stock. This is "advanced' territory, and almost all accuracy benefits can be obtained before stock/action bedding.
 

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Some "other" brand synthetic stocks need the mag well reinforcement but the OP is talking about a Ruger synthetic.
No use clouding the thread with details of "fitting" a mag well reinforcement, as it doesn't apply here.

The butt pad on the synthetic stock is more firm than the wood stock's pad. Not near as grabby either.

Wood stock weight will vary with density depending on the individual piece of wood.
My synthetic stock Mini feels WAY lighter in the hand than the wood stocked one.
In actual weight it's only around 1/2 pound, but it feels like much more.
 

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Some "other" brand synthetic stocks need the mag well reinforcement but the OP is talking about a Ruger synthetic.
No use clouding the thread with details of "fitting" a mag well reinforcement, as it doesn't apply here.

The butt pad on the synthetic stock is more firm than the wood stock's pad. Not near as grabby either.

Wood stock weight will vary with density depending on the individual piece of wood.
My synthetic stock Mini feels WAY lighter in the hand than the wood stocked one.
In actual weight it's only around 1/2 pound, but it feels like much more.
sandog, you are correct saying ruger syn stocks do not require the metal stock reinforcement. My fault in not reading the OP.

I have gone through so many stocks on some of my rifles that I have forgotten which need internal reinforcements, and which do not. My mistake.

That said, I have some personal experience in bedding syn (and wooden) stocks, and some of them can benefit from doing so. Some more than others. Most syn stocks are GTG as-issued, but sometimes improvements can be made.

Lexington, I think your idea of transitioning to a syn stock has many advantages, and few downsides. The hollow buttstock can be used as a storage area for all sorts of useful stuff, such as cleaning supplies, spare parts, and so forth. Adding some useful weight/mass to the rear of the rifle serves to make the rifle a bit lighter in the muzzle, and thus "livelier' in the field. Your un-blemished wooden stock is best kept so, for re-sale value. The syn stock can easily be painted to mimic wood if desired.
 

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The syn stock can easily be painted to mimic wood if desired.
Yes, the syn stock can be Cerakoted in FDE like the one I pictured above, or grey or any one of a hundred different colors. Although Cerakote is a form of paint, once done, it will go years, even decades without having to be touched up.

The Ruger synthetic is lighter, slimmer, stiff and grippy where you need it,( the checkering. )
Although the wood stock looks cool, I found myself not shooting the wood stock Mini much the last few years.
The synthetic is more durable and more stable in humidity extremes.

Currently my wood stock is sitting in a corner, and that Mini barreled action now sits in a Butler Creek folding stock.
Basically a Ruger synthetic on the front end, mated with a steel tube folding mechanism on the rear.
While almost as heavy as the Ruger wood stocks, that Mini can now be made a foot and a half shorter when need be, and when extended shoots and feels as good as a fixed stock.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, the syn stock can be Cerakoted in FDE like the one I pictured above, or grey or any one of a hundred different colors. Although Cerakote is a form of paint, once done, it will go years, even decades without having to be touched up.

The Ruger synthetic is lighter, slimmer, stiff and grippy where you need it,( the checkering. )
Although the wood stock looks cool, I found myself not shooting the wood stock Mini much the last few years.
The synthetic is more durable and more stable in humidity extremes.

Currently my wood stock is sitting in a corner, and that Mini barreled action now sits in a Butler Creek folding stock.
Basically a Ruger synthetic on the front end, mated with a steel tube folding mechanism on the rear.
While almost as heavy as the Ruger wood stocks, that Mini can now be made a foot and a half shorter when need be, and when extended shoots and feels as good as a fixed stock.

Thank you.
 

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Usually when I purchase a new replacement Ruger synthetic stock the heat shield is included, but if it is not, I just buy a heat shield as a replacement part ($12 to $15) and install it.

Using this method I don't have to swap it back and forth and both stocks remain ready for service with just a quick switch of the action. Something you might want to consider?
 
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Another aspect here is the Ruger Synthetic stock has a shorter LOP than the current Ruger wood stocks. To me, that is a plus as I do not have Orangutan-arms. It has about the same LOP as the original early-series Mini wood stocks (with a curved butt-plate).
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Another aspect here is the Ruger Synthetic stock has a shorter LOP than the current Ruger wood stocks. To me, that is a plus as I do not have Orangutan-arms. It has about the same LOP as the original early-series Mini wood stocks (with a curved butt-plate).
Awesome. That's one reason I hacked the spongy pad off my wood stock; not only was it catching my shirt but I found the LOP too long. I'm 6' 1". But I shoot an M16 with my nose almost touching the charging handle. 😝

Thanks for the helpful comments.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks so much for the info. I got the stock (thanks Midway!) today and just installed it.

Dang, that thing is nice. The rifle looks better and feels so much better to me. Just as I heard, it's very solid and the checkering on the pistol grip and the forearm make it so much easier to grab than my slippery wooden stock! It's also lighter, despite the small difference "on paper."

When I was installing it, for a minute I thought I had a defective one since it didn't just "drop in" like my wooden stock. With my old stock, the action would just drop in easily and I could snap the trigger guard down with a little pressure from my fingers, like an old M1. With this thing, I had to play with it a bit to get them together and when I locked the trigger guard down, I had to give it a little pop with my palm. It seems this stock fits the action a lot more snug than my wood stock did! Is that common with the factory Ruger units?

Anyway, thanks again. I can't wait to get her to the range. :cool:

64480
 

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Thanks so much for the info. I got the stock (thanks Midway!) today and just installed it.

Dang, that thing is nice. The rifle looks better and feels so much better to me. Just as I heard, it's very solid and the checkering on the pistol grip and the forearm make it so much easier to grab than my slippery wooden stock! It's also lighter, despite the small difference "on paper."

When I was installing it, for a minute I thought I had a defective one since it didn't just "drop in" like my wooden stock. With my old stock, the action would just drop in easily and I could snap the trigger guard down with a little pressure from my fingers, like an old M1. With this thing, I had to play with it a bit to get them together and when I locked the trigger guard down, I had to give it a little pop with my palm. It seems this stock fits the action a lot more snug than my wood stock did! Is that common with the factory Ruger units?

Anyway, thanks again. I can't wait to get her to the range. :cool:

View attachment 64480
Ideally, one desires a certain amount of force to close the trigger guard, regardless of the composition of the stock. If the trigger guard requires some definite and increased amount of force to close, perhaps within 1/2 inch of full locking, all is well. Lube the action/trigger guard points with grease. Seen many loose M1 actions where such components were never lubed, and thus worn-out..
 

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My 580 stainless Mini came with the synthetic stock.

The synthetic is rugged, lighter, checkered in the right places, and has a shorter LOP which I like.
Also, to my eye, it makes the gun look like a cheap Chinese toy. And the comb is too low for a scope, so I had to tape some black foam pipe insulation there for a proper cheek weld, and that looks even uglier.

I bought a new Ruger wood stock. Mine is beautiful, not the fence-post wood of some Ruger stocks.
The LOP is seriously longer than synthetic, too long. Slightly slippery. Dents/scratches easily.
 
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