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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
From what I have read projectile weight should be from 65 grain to 80 grain for a 1 in 7" twist rate (185 series mini 14) to get the best stability and the larger weight projectiles are longer.

Seating the projectile too deep can cause pressures to rise to catastrophic levels.

What is the longest projectile that can be used in the mini 14 so the round is not too long for the magazines?

Could I load an 80 grain projectile to the depth required for reliable magazine feeding without seating it too deep in the case?

This would be used for hunting rabbits, foxes, goats and deer so hollow points, ballistic tipped or other such projectiles would be used and FMJ are off the list.

Also I have a set of 2 Lee reloading dies not the deluxe set, should I get the factory crimp die or just use the roll crimp?

I have reloaded for 9mm pistol before but never for rifle, I have the 7th edition of the Hornady reloading manual as a general guide, I can buy other manuals if needed.
 

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My 186 series likes reloaded Sierra 69 gr HPBT Matchkings the best with IMR 4320. I tried some 68gr Hornadys and 77gr Sierras and they werent as accurate. I would use those on any varmint.
I haven't tried anything heavier than the 77,
 

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From what I have read projectile weight should be from 65 grain to 80 grain for a 1 in 7" twist rate (185 series mini 14) to get the best stability and the larger weight projectiles are longer.

Seating the projectile too deep can cause pressures to rise to catastrophic levels.

What is the longest projectile that can be used in the mini 14 so the round is not too long for the magazines?

Could I load an 80 grain projectile to the depth required for reliable magazine feeding without seating it too deep in the case?

This would be used for hunting rabbits, foxes, goats and deer so hollow points, ballistic tipped or other such projectiles would be used and FMJ are off the list.

Also I have a set of 2 Lee reloading dies not the deluxe set, should I get the factory crimp die or just use the roll crimp?

I have reloaded for 9mm pistol before but never for rifle, I have the 7th edition of the Hornady reloading manual as a general guide, I can buy other manuals if needed.
Although this may be true in a straight walled pistol cartridge it is not so in a botleneck rifle cartridge. Yes, seating depth may affect pressures in your 223, but not to catostophic levels. If fact, Barnes did a study on the affects of OAL and pressure. What they found was in most cartridges tested, pressure actually decreased as the bullets were seated deaper.
Scroll down to "From the Lab" http://www.barnesbullets.com/resources/newsletters/september-2007-barnes-bullet-n/

There is plenty of load 223 load data using 69-80gr bullets seated to 2.260 or less. If 2.26 is to long for the Mini Mag, seat them deeper, you will be fine, just remember to always start low and work up.

http://www.ramshot.com/powders/

http://data.hodgdon.com/cartridge_load.asp

http://accuratepowder.com/data/Acc Guide v3.3 version.pdf

http://accuratepowder.com/data/Acc Guide v3.3 version.pdf

http://www.alliantpowder.com/reloaders/recipedetail.aspx?gtypeid=2&weight=77&shellid=46&bulletid=92

http://www.lapua.com/fileadmin/user_upload/esitteet/VihtavuoriInternationalReloguide2009.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
freesw, ACRider:
Thanks, will consider loads similar to those.


steve4102:
The from the lab article was about the distance from the rifling and the pressure effects but still useful info.

I was more concerned with the seating depth and any pressure issues there may be as the rounds need to fit in the mag but as you pointed out there shouldn't be a problem as well as the fact that there are 77 grain projectile loads that fit in the mag without any pressure issues and the easiest projectiles to get here that are in the 60-80 grain weight are 77 grain.

Thanks for the links, I have some reading to do. :cool:

That just leaves the crimping question, when I loaded 9mm I was told to not crimp as it wasn't necessary or would have a negative effect (can't remember which, it was over 15 years ago :eek: ).

Should I use no crimp, should I roll crimp or should I factory crimp?
 

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That just leaves the crimping question, when I loaded 9mm I was told to not crimp as it wasn't necessary or would have a negative effect (can't remember which, it was over 15 years ago :eek: ).

Should I use no crimp, should I roll crimp or should I factory crimp?
Sorry, more reading! This is from the experts at Sierra on loading for Service rifles.

Neck Tension
When we stop to consider the vigorous (read, downright violent) chambering cycle a loaded round endures in a Service Rifle, it becomes pretty clear it suffers abuse that would never happen in a bolt-action. This is simply the nature of the beast. It needs to be dealt with since there is no way around it.
There are two distinctly different forces that need to be considered: those that force the bullet deeper into the case, and those that pull it out of the case. When the round is stripped from the magazine and launched up the feed ramp, any resistance encountered by the bullet risks having it set back deeper into the case. Due to the abrupt stop the cartridge makes when the shoulder slams to a halt against the chamber, inertia dictates that the bullet will continue to move forward. This is exactly the same principle a kinetic bullet puller operates on, and it works within a chamber as well. Some years ago, we decided to examine this phenomenon more closely. During tests here at Sierra's range, we chambered a variety of factory Match ammunition in an AR-15 rifle. This ammunition was from one of the most popular brands in use today, loaded with Sierra's 69 grain MatchKing bullet. To conduct the test, we chambered individual rounds by inserting them into the magazines and manually releasing the bolt. We then repeated the tests by loading two rounds into the magazine, chambering and firing the first, and then extracting and measuring the second round. This eliminated any potential variation caused by the difference between a bolt that had been released from an open position (first round in the magazine) and those subsequent rounds that were chambered by the normal semi-automatic operation of the rifle. Measuring the rounds before chambering and then re-measuring after they were carefully extracted resulted in an average increase of three thousandths (0.003") of forward bullet movement. Some individual rounds showed up to seven thousandths (0.007") movement. Please bear in mind that these results were with factory ammunition, normally having a higher bullet pull than handloaded ammunition.
To counteract this tendency, the semi-auto shooter is left with basically two options: applying a crimp or increasing neck tension.

Link to entire article.
http://www.exteriorballistics.com/reloadbasics/gasgunreload.cfm

Factory Crimp!
 

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I crimp all of my 223. I also load it to a length that will work in my Mini 14's. The deciding factor is the lenght of the magazine. I have several 223's and one is a bolt and tha other is a break open style but they all get loaded and crimped and can be used in my Mini's. kwg
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
steve4102:
No need to apologise, reading is good it pours knowledge into the brain. ;)

That article makes perfect sense, I have used a kinetic bullet puller and even a light rap on the ground will move a bullet a visible amount so the slamming of the round into the chamber moving the bullet a few thousandths of an inch is a given.

Looks like I will buy the factory crimp die or buy the Lee Deluxe die set and keep the 2 die RGB set for spares.

Which brings up another question or two, do you use the roll crimp in the seating die and then the factory crimp die or just the factory crimp die?
My guess is just the factory crimp die.
 
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