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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Any reloaders have issues with CCI primers? I'm loading 26gr of H335 for .223 and using the CCI's. Today I had 4 rounds (out of ~50) that didn't go bang. I ran them through a second time and they fired as normal. 1 of the 4 did have a firing pin dimple in the primer. Seems like an issue of light striking. This is the only time I have ever a failure to fire with 14. Any thoughts?

-Drew
 

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You have to make sure your seating your primers all the way. I have never had issues with CCI primers except for a couple super tuned revolvers that would not set them off reliably double action. If your primers are not seated all the way the first hit will sometimes seat it and the second hit will set it off. I have loaded lots of .223 with CCI small rifle primers without issue.
 

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I take it the rifle fired correctly prior to these handloads? It sounds like your brass has been resized incorrectly and there is excessive headspace. This will cause the firing pin not to be able to strike the primer deep enough. A simple way to check your cartidge for proper headspace is with a L.E. Wilson case length headspace gauge. Case Length Headspace Gage 223 Remington Unless the primers have been improperly stored, I doubt they are the cause of the misfires. Primers will be fine stored for decades if they are kept dry in low humidity. When resizing for cartridges to be used in the same rifle they were fired in, it works well to only "bump" the shoulder back about .002" on your fired brass. If the cartridges will be fired in multiple firearms, I would reccomend you purchase the aforementioned L.E. Wilson gauge and full length size for the correct fit when inserted in the gauge. To further answer your question, I have used CCI primers without any problems.
 

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Whenever reloading for an autoloader you should FL resize your brass.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the quick responses. I do use a FL resize die. My loads prior to today have only been fired in an AR. All have been without issue. I will pick up a headspace gauge tomorrow to verify (I should have one but I am newish to reloading). I use a RCBS hand priming tool and they feel they are seated solidly. But I won't rule that out.
 

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I have a Lee hand prime tool and they are pretty reliable once you get a feel for using them. A quick way to check that the primers are seated (provided your primer pocket is correct) is to lay a steel 6" rule across the cartridge head and slide it across and over the primer. If the rule crosses over the primer without catching on it, most likely the primer is fully seated. This is a good practice to use as a safety check after you have installed primers. In my previous post I was implying that you "bump" the shoulder back .002" with your full length sizeing die. You may have shoved the shoulder back too far during the FL operation. This is easy to measure and the tool needed is inexpensive assuming you already have a 6" dial or digital caliper. Simply obtain the starting measurement from brass previously fired in your rifle and then set up your FL die to "bump" the shoulder back the desired amount. Here is where you can get the tool: Sinclair Bump Gage Insert - Sinclair Intl Hope this helps.
 

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STOP WHAT YOU'RE DOING wmass762!!!!! CLAYS IS NOT SAFE FOR CENTERFIRE RIFLE CARTRIDGES!!!!! That powder is for shotguns and handgun cartridges and I can't find a recipie in any of my reloading manuals for what you're doing. I suggest that you take your rifle to a competent gunsmith and have it inspected. You may have damaged your bolt locking lugs so that the firing pin has to reach too far. fishslayerbob
 

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STOP WHAT YOU'RE DOING wmass762!!!!! CLAYS IS NOT SAFE FOR CENTERFIRE RIFLE CARTRIDGES!!!!! That powder is for shotguns and handgun cartridges and I can't find a recipie in any of my reloading manuals for what you're doing. I suggest that you take your rifle to a competent gunsmith and have it inspected. You may have damaged your bolt locking lugs so that the firing pin has to reach too far. fishslayerbob
I was thinking the same thing, the powder is too fast and building too much pressure. Tell us that was a typo!
 

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STOP WHAT YOU'RE DOING wmass762!!!!! CLAYS IS NOT SAFE FOR CENTERFIRE RIFLE CARTRIDGES!!!!! That powder is for shotguns and handgun cartridges and I can't find a recipie in any of my reloading manuals for what you're doing. I suggest that you take your rifle to a competent gunsmith and have it inspected. You may have damaged your bolt locking lugs so that the firing pin has to reach too far. fishslayerbob
Great Call fishslayerbob. I don't load for shotgun and was asleep at the switch with the Clay's thing. There most certainly would not be any load info for a .223 Rem caliber using Clays. wmass762 is putting much more than his rifle in peril. Here is what Hodgson says about Clays:

Introduced in January, 1992, CLAYS gunpowder has "taken the clay target world by storm". It is the cleanest burning , most consistent 12 ga. 7/8., 1 oz. and 1 1/8 oz. powder available today, the preferred choice of competitive target shooters.. The superb burning characteristics of this powder produce soft, smooth recoil and excellent patterns. These features transfer directly to handgun applications where target shooting is the main goal. 45 ACP and 38 Special are only two of the cartridges where CLAYS gunpowder provides "tack driving" target accuracy with flawless functioning. Available in 14 oz., 4 lb. & 8 lb. containers.
wmass762 better get some good reloading manuals and a mentor before he ruins more than the rifle. Reloading is a serious endeavor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
OH DAMN! My bad, it was a long day. I have Clays for pistol, and H335 for rifle. 26gr H335 with a 55gr fmj. I can't believe I could brain fart that badly. I am; however, very glad people caught that typo. Just reinforces there's a lot of knowledge on this forum. I'm off to the fun store to get a head space gauge. Will post the results tonight.

Thanks again!
 

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OH DAMN! My bad, it was a long day. I have Clays for pistol, and H335 for rifle. 26gr H335 with a 55gr fmj. I can't believe I could brain fart that badly. I am; however, very glad people caught that typo. Just reinforces there's a lot of knowledge on this forum. I'm off to the fun store to get a head space gauge. Will post the results tonight.

Thanks again!
H335 has been a longtime favorite in the .223 for me! Sure glad that you were not using the Clays!
 

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the only issue i had with cci is they seem harder to seat using the lee tool. i have had better luck with winchester. i am using 25 gr of varget under a 55 grfmj hornady and getting sub moa with my savage and a little under 2 in with my mini. the latest lyman lists that as the potentially most accurate. im sure i could fine tune the load but less than 2 in is good for a mini and the savage results are great and i only have to make one load for both guns.
 

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the only issue i had with cci is they seem harder to seat using the lee tool. i have had better luck with winchester. i am using 25 gr of varget under a 55 grfmj hornady and getting sub moa with my savage and a little under 2 in with my mini. the latest lyman lists that as the potentially most accurate. im sure i could fine tune the load but less than 2 in is good for a mini and the savage results are great and i only have to make one load for both guns.
How far is Varget throwing your brass?

I tried Varget in my 581 Tactical and it threw brass significantly farther than my H335 loads. It also yielded lower velocities. Accuracy was comparable. I believe Varget being slower yields higher pressure at the gas port but slower bullet acceleration.
 

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http://data.hodgdon.com/cartridge_load.asp

Hodgdon does have .223 reduced loads using Clays. It is 1060 fps.
But they do not indicate any other .223 loads using Clays.

Actually this should work well for a suppressor load.

Just thought I'd throw this in.

I use a Wilson gage to check all my reload set-ups along with a Hornady basic dimension checker occasionally. It is a very good idea.
 

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I sure am glad that was a typo! That load would have turned that rifle into a pipe bomb! I raced home after work today and logged on to check this thread. Whew!
 

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my mini will launch brass an easy 20ft or more. there was no difference between my reloads and the steel cased tula as far as brass throwing. i was standing by my son while he was shooting and got caught in the face. left one hell of a bruise.
 

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the only issue i had with cci is they seem harder to seat using the lee tool
I thought I was the only one having this issue. With the Lee, I can only get them flush. Hard to get them a little under..but they still go boom!! For every unfired round that is chambered, I can see light strike marks.
 

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I use CCI primers and the RCBS hand priming tool and since I bought that I hardly ever use my press to prime anymore. I have never had any issues with the CCI primers or seating them with the RCBS tool. It makes priming tons easier in my opinion. I have used Tac, W748, IMR-4895, and H335 powder. I really like the 335 and tac.
 
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