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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The M1 Carbine stock for my 10/22 has a couple dings in it and I want to try refinishing it to the boiled linseed oil look. I'm a water treater, not a wood finisher. My tentative plan is to strip the rather cheap stain/varnish layer down to bare wood, assess the color and grain, then rub in the linseed oil. Does that plan sound right?
 

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After stripping, you'l want to sand the wood with progressively finer sandpaper till it is smooth as glass. Start with something in the 100 grit range and work down to at least 220, I would probably go all the way down to 400 and then use fine (0000) steel wool. Some light dings can be removed by laying a damp cloth over it and the steaming it out with a hot steam iron. I normally start out by thinning my linseed oil 50/50 with naptha or similar thinner so that it will soak deeper into the wood, and then give 24 hours drying time between coats. After it dries, rub it down with either fine steel wool or the finest grit of sandpaper that you used on it prior to applying the oil. Gradually work up to straight oil and put as many coats as you can stand on it. The more coats the better/tougher finish you will have. It will get a little darker with each coat as well. The main thing is not to rush it. A good oil finish takes at least a week or more depending on how many coats you want to apply. I would go with 3 minimum and then as many more as you want to get the desired look.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm loosely familiar with both linseed and tung oil, but I've never used either one. This is my rookie refinishing job. Definitely not life or death, but I want to know what I'm doing and get it right. No hurry, so taking plenty of time is no problem. My goal is to produce a matte finish like the one on my M1A. I realize the SAI stock is walnut and the M1 Carbine replica stock is something different (like birch?). Color differences are fine; it's the feel I'm after.
 

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If you want it to be a matte finish, this is achieved by rubbing down with fine steel wool after the final coat of oil has dried. The nice thing about an oil finish is that it is nearly impossibly to screw up. It is just oil soaked into wood. Not like varnishes or paints. The most important thing IMO is prepping the wood beforehand. The slicker the wood is the better the final finish will turn out. Another trick is; after you have sanded or rubbed the wood down with steel wool to the point you think it is ready to finish, rub it down with water and a rag and then let it dry an sand it one last time. This is called whiskering the wood, it causes the fibers of the wood to stand up then you can sand them off to the point it will be as smooth as good Irish whiskey.
 

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For many, many years I have used TruOil. Finish wood to desired smoothness, clean stock with alcohol. When dry, rub a couple of fingertips of TruOil on the wood. When first dab is spread thin, dab a couple more til stock is covered. Rub the TruOil in with every dab. I usually put about six coats on the wood. One coat every 24 hours.

Now here is a neat trick. I have used the method and it will work.

Remove old finish and smooth the wood. Wipe down with alcohol. When good and dry, spray Armor All very lightly on a 6" square of stock. Rub in for a couple of seconds and wipe off lightly. Use the TruOil as before. The chemical reaction between the two will cause the TruOil to dry very quickly. You can put on ten coats in a day. This puts on a matte finish and leaves the wood with a fine semi-gloss handrubbed finish. You can see the little cracks and crevasses. If you do not care for the shiny luster of TruOil by itself, this will make you smile.
 

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Try this it is easy and I use it all the time. Take a can of REGULAR easy off oven cleaner. Spray a small area at first, let it sit for 15 minutes and with warm water wipe it off. Removes everything right down to bare wood. If you have dents in the wood use a clothing iron on steam mode, hold directly above the dent using steam and the wood will rise back to its original shape. Let the stock stand for 3 days before applying anything to it. Peace.
 

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Apparently there is no residue that would thwart the ability to get a dried out finish.

I do some stocks for cowboy shooters. The other day i ran into a stock that would not get dry with TruOil. Stripped and tried three times. Took a heat gun and cooked some old oil out of the grip area. it was a Winchester M12.

Finally reverted to a spray coat or three with polyurethane. Looked great.
 
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