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By the way guys, I do not like bolt action rifles. I am too impatient to be fumbling with a bolt and loading a rifle 1 bullet at a time. I like sei-automatic firepower, magazine fed and accuracy, You can say I like my cake and eat it too. :ar15:
 

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I have 3 semi autos, 22, 223, 308. I would like to have at least 1 bolt gun for super long range shooting.
 

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What about bolt action Remington 700 with M14 magazine modification? That is one of my wish list projects.
 

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Paul, if you are, or ever get into reloading, an external magazine, can be a real henderence. As most benchrest types know the bullet is more accurate at .010" or less into the lands. With a magazine you are limited to the size of the mag for bullet seating. With an external mag. you might be .1" to .3" from the lands. Just something to think about.
 

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Paul Feaster
That’s where I got the idea. It would make a nice companion to the AR-10 I don't own either. I really need to win the lottery or something. There are just too many cool things to spend money on.

RE reloading, it is a detractor, but the neat thing is you could still feed one at a time if you want. That way you could see if it made that much difference. I do reload, but mostly on the progressive. I must feed the autos.
 

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I reload 10 out of 100 rounds for my mini 14 out to the lands. I load one into the chamber first, and then add the mag behind it. that way my first shot is always my best shot before the spray of lead:D . I always put a red stripe on the neck of these loads with a paint pen so I can see the diff, without standing two shells next to each other.

I only do this with the more expensive balistic tip projectiles.:usa:
 

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Ivan, thats a good idea, especially when your hunting, where your first shot, may be the only shot, unless your in open country. I may give it a try.
 

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Ivan,
You totally lost me on this seating procedure. Are you saying that you don't seat the supersonic part fully into the brass for better accuracy? Are you playing with fire to load this way?

To digress,
That first microsecond has always been a mystery to me. When we pull the trigger, we are forcing a slug of solid metal into a tube with grooves, and of a slightly smaller diameter than the supersonic part. That we get accuracy out of this arrangement is truly a technological achievement.

That it doesn't ever blow up in our faces is even more amazing.

KC
 

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Some rifles love to have the bullet out to the lands. Think about the small leap under enormous pressure the bullet takes to get to the lands. If the bullet yaws a tiny bit in the throat it is already doomed. The idea of seating into the lands is to get the bullet started in the barrel straight. Yes this raises pressure a bit. No I would not do it in a hunting situation just because the likelyhood Mr. Murphy suggests is reliability problems. This is a bench rester's trick. The 80gr Sierra bullets used in the 600 yd stage of Highpower Rifle must be loaded this way and single-fed.
 

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I have a reloading question for you guys. I used to reload 22-250 bullets for a remington 700 bolt action gun, years ago when I was young and stupid. I had been told by the guy who sold me the dies that there is no problem reloading 22-250 brass. I've been thinking about getting back into reloading again, but don't want to make the same mistake, if in fact i was making a mistake.

First, I probably reloaded many 22-250 cases 3-4 times before I would discard it. (22-250 cartidges were very expensive!) For the most part these reloads functioned ok, once I got them to fit into the chamber. But I recall having to really crank on the bolt to get it to lock down. Obviously the case was a little distorted or too long. I thought the sizing die was supposed to take care of this. These reloads never would have come close to working in a semi-automatic rifle. By the time I reloaded a case 3-4 times, I noticed that they were pretty distorted and bulging around the neck - at that point I would toss it.

My questions are - how dangerous was this? How many times can you reuse brass? Would I use a case trimmer to take care of the elongation of the brass? Why wasn't my resizing die taking care of the problem with fit?
 

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Wow, I didnt see once the mention of case trimming. the reason we trim the case to tolerance as specified by the reloading manuals is that if the case neck is too long, you will see a great rise in pressure. Not good. the dies will not correct any part of this. RCBS has introduced a series called X-sizer dies that are supposed to eliminate the need fro trimming but I have no experience with them.
The higher pressure cases such as the 22-250 will tend to grow, or flow, whichever term you prefer faster than lower pressure rounds such as the 7.62 x 39. as to the distortion of brass I would try to load down to a more reasonable pressure to realize better accuracy, longer case life and longer barrel life.
 

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Redchip, Ivanimal Has good advice, also if I may add, a reloading manual is essential. I have; Sierra, Nosler, Hornaday, and lyman. The Lyman is the best for beginners, as it explanes the prossces step by step. The first few chapters of each manual gives excellent instructions to reload with. The important thing is start with 10% lower than max load to see how your cases are handling the pressure. I also started out young, and stupid reloading. I didn't make any fatal mistakes, but when I look back at some things I did, I shudder! Now older, and wiser I follow the instructions of the experts. I have reloaded for my mini, 4 times with the same brass, it still showes no fatigue signs. For an auto loader I have heard from others, you can expect up to 10 reloads, with a bolt gun, just neck sizing, you can reload 30 or 40 times with quality brass. You must trim when cases exceed max allowed length. I believe you would really appreciate the benifits of reloading the 2nd time around :D
 

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Thanks for your advice. Case trimming was something I only became aware of about 5 years after I sold the 22-250. I believe that would have solved my biggest problem - trying to get the cartridge to slide nicely into the chamber without having to slam the bolt with the palm of my hand several times just to get it to close. But I don't know if that would have stopped the bulging in the area where the case was necked down - but, now that i think about it, maybe it would. if the cartridge is not fitting all the way in the chamber because it was too long, then there could be a small gap allowing the case to expand. And I remember that I would load the 22-250's pretty hot! It's a wonder that the gun didn't blow up in my face. I went through a lot of reloaded 22-250 ammo back then.

Most of my guns are .223's - but with all of the military surplus ammo out there, I don't see that you can save all that much money by reloading your own ammo, unless of course you are making match grade ammo. What is your average cost of reloading 1000 rounds of .223 ammo?
 

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Custom Made Match ammo, I can make 1,000 rds for $164.80. Or $3.29 for a box of 20. It is not only cheap, it is custom made to shoot in my mini, to hunt with or whatever I load it for. Yea you can buy some wolf, or etc. cheaper (not suited for hunting), but the reloads will be more accurate, and suited for hunting. If ya just want to plink or bang away go for the cheap stuff!! Personally I just like making my own bullets, or arrows, cheaper, and better than factory! :D
 
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