Perfect Union banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I just recently got my M1 Garand. At this point, I don't feel comfortable shooting it due to some issues I found. I only gave $300 for the rifle so I feel I got a great deal on it regardless. Upon tear down, I found about an inch of the recoil spring is broken off. That is no big deal, and an easy fix. However, the receiver has a hairline crack in the back portion of it. It goes all the way though to the inside. Here is a picture of my M1, and the receiver with the crack. The question is, can this crack be welded or otherwise repaired. I would like to keep the original receiver intact on the rifle. My M1, is a Winchester, built in or around May of 1942. It does have a Springfield barrel with a June 1951 date, and a few other SA parts, so not all the parts are original Winchester. The receiver does NOT show signs of being a welded "demilitarized" receiver. Inside the receiver looks good. I am also including a link to pictures of the parts when I tore it down. Without further adue. Here is my Winchester.


And here is the crack in question. What would it take to weld this and make it safe to fire?


Here is the link to the my album with all the pictures of parts, etc.
M1 pictures by Tudorp - Photobucket
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
437 Posts
Yes, it can be repaired. Whether it's safe is controversial. Even if it's safe, it might not be worth it. There are many Garand receivers out there that have been welded. I'm not an expert in that area, but I do know it takes a welder experienced in TIG welding receivers, plus you'll almost certainly need to re-heat treat the receiver.
Your longitudinal crack is not the typical vertical crack that's caused by an out of battery slamfire or launching a grenade without one of the pressure-relief gas plugs. Nor does the back of your bolt look peened.

I know you wanted to keep the Winchester receiver, but I'd be inclined to replace that receiver. There are a fair number of Garand receivers out there.

The other (potential) issue is that your rifle is a Blue Sky import. These guns were re-imported from Korea about 20-odd years ago. There are lots of horror stories about Blue Sky guns, all of which were mixmaster rifles (like yours). Seems lots of them had shot-out bores and worn parts that were been re-parkerized to make them look good. Before sinking more $ into this rifle (which does look very nice, BTW), you might want to make sure it's worth sinking $ into.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It does have a "Blue Sky" marking on the muzzle... Is that what that means?

Actually it is a Winchester, but has some Springfield marked parts ("SA"). The barrel on the charging arm side is marked as a Springfield Armory, June 1951. The Winchester serial puts the original build of the Garand from Winchester as May 1941.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
437 Posts
Yep, the Blue Sky marking is the importer name. Googling Blue Sky Imports will get you the good, bad and ugly.

The reason I said "mixmaster" is that, while the receiver is a Winchester, not all of the other parts are: you have a mix of Winchester and Springfield Armory (and perhaps other makers) parts on your rifle. No big deal, it just means that it has almost certainly been rebuilt at least once, just like all the other non-collector Garands out there. That doesn't matter for a shooter (all the CMP Rack, Field and Service Grade rifles are mixmasters). The collector value is already lowered by the Blue Sky marking, but non-"correct" parts pretty much negates any collector value.

I'd do a careful check of the parts to see if any are out of allowable tolerances and see how much muzzle wear it has (throat wear is less detrimental to accuracy). Criterion makes brand new Garand barrels, price is about $180, plus the cost for rebarreling and headspacing. Surplus barrels run about $200 and up to OMG prices, depending on rarity.
A new surplus receiver will run you about $200-$250, but you might not find any Winchesters. Price that against the cost of a repair.

Based on finances and your comfort level with a weld vs. your desire to have a Winchester, you can decide which way to go. By the time you get done, you'll likely be at the price of a CMP Field Grade rifle ($525), perhaps even a Service Grade ($625).

There are some folks (braver than I) who will willingly give you at least what you paid for it, because they "ain't skeert" of a cracked receiver, and/or have the skill to reweld it.

OTOH, if you're dead set on having a Winchester Garand, you'll want to join the Garand Collector's Association, learn all the arcane tidbits about what is "correct" and set about collecting all the parts to make it so. It gets expensive, but it might be worth it to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
CMP sells original M1 receivers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
It is very difficult to terminate a stress crack by welding to keep it from further propagation. Odds are the underlying metal had either an alloy mixture deficiency due to war time conditions, or, the metal was stressed by differential cooling, if not by exceeding strain during manufacture to size it. The normal cyclic stress is too close to the modulus of elasticity, or it wouldn't have cracked in the first place. Life is to short not to do it right. Alot of the rebuilds were repatriated from Korea after the war, and they are known for short-cut being taken.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
I had a slam fire when out of battery with a M1. It was a combination of errors but the most obvious was using a federal match primer, too soft for a gas gun. The receiver had a verticle split about one inch from the rear of the receiver. A local M1 builder tig welded it and I shot it for a few years then it was stolen. This was a verticle split and also not a stress crack. I do not have an opinion to offer.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top