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hostilenativelibertarian.
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I never thought of commercial brass being annealed, makes sense as the factories know their brass from loaded ammo could get reloaded multiple times, and they wouldn't want to get a reputation of having brass that splits easily. But it seems it would be real hard to polish out the discoloration from annealing. I say this cause a few weeks ago I went to work and forgot to turn off some Mil brass going in the tumbler. It was going for 10 hours, and annealing was still as visible as when new. Maybe the factories have a way of polishing it so it can't be seen. That batch of brass that I over did sure was clean and bright though!
:lol:Better buy a timer to correct that problem!
 

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I tumble brass that shows the annealing all the time and after a few hours in the tumbler it all looks like " factory" ammo... no annealing showing... <shrug> dunno what to tell ya...

:D
 

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Just looked again at a bag of military brass that I tumbled last week and while the annealing isn't as visible as before, the brass is darker at the shoulder and neck area. Maybe I need to get some new polishing media,
 

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I've never had split necks that I can remember and I use both military and commercial brass. There's often enough laying on the ground where I shoot that I have plenty for my use (usually reload 2 times max anyway).

Used to have a Mini-14 that often would split the case about in the middle and leave the front 1/2 in the chamber. That was back when I first started reloading and I only got 1 reload before that split happened. I thought it was headspace but it still split them that way after I had a smith turn the barrel back.

Now I use an AR and that hasn't happened with it so far and I use the same batches of reloaded ammo I used in the Mini.
 

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One of the requirements for military ammo is that the annealing must be visible to determine that the cases were in fact annealed. The annealing of brass, whether commercial or military, provides some softness to the brass which is necessary to maintain proper neck tension. If the brass is too hard, when the bullet is seated, the brass will simply open up when the bullet enters the brass and not have enough "spring" to hold the bullet in place.

Neither the military nor commercial manufacturers give a rat's patootie about reloaders. They all anneal brass for their own quality concerns.
 

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One of the requirements for military ammo is that the annealing must be visible to determine that the cases were in fact annealed. The annealing of brass, whether commercial or military, provides some softness to the brass which is necessary to maintain proper neck tension. If the brass is too hard, when the bullet is seated, the brass will simply open up when the bullet enters the brass and not have enough "spring" to hold the bullet in place.

Neither the military nor commercial manufacturers give a rat's patootie about reloaders. They all anneal brass for their own quality concerns.
Special note the last paragraph. It's up to you to reload safely and carefully. As medalguy said, it's all about them and not about you. kwg
 

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I use a lot of Milsurp brass and so far have no neck cracks. My decapping pins are polished to .02 thousands undersize to keep bullets in place without crimping . They run very high temps so I anneal after five or six loadings. I run some .69 grains and some 62 grains.
 
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