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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When shimming is it alright to put a thicker shim on one side rather than 2 thin ones on both sides. Two thin ones is going to be kind of hard to do.
 

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likely provide some benefit, can't see as it would harm. some use aluminum can others use credit card I used thin copper sheet I had on hand, easier to hold shape when formed to fit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I really want to keep everything square just for squares sake. I may try and bevel the edges of the arms that keep messing things up. Gotta go and find a pop can as that may be about the right thickness.
 

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When shimming WHAT?

Tell us what your goal is, and tell us what you are working-with.

We are all about helping you, but help us out with a lot more details.
 

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and to tighten the trigger group lock up. I also bedded the gas block to fore stock fit up.
 

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Jefferson, I haven't heard of trying to use two thin shims on one side, at least that is what I understood from your opening question. One on each side is the way I've seen everyone else do it.

I use credit card material, and rough up the side of the shim that will go against the stock, and rough up the corresponding area on the stock where the shim will sit.
My wood stock fits the action pretty tight, but I noticed some side to side wiggle with the synthetic stock M-30 so it got the shim job.

There is no downside to shimming your action tighter in the stock.
I want my shims to stay in and not ever fall out, so the shim is epoxied to the stock. Roughing the surfaces improves the adhesion.
One more thing that is helpful is beveling the top edge of the shim before putting them in.
That makes it easier to drop the barreled action back in the stock, also without the bevel, you are more likely to snag the shim and break it or loosen it when inserting the action back in the stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I bought some .025 aluminum and there is no way to get the action in even with beveled edges. I'm going to try cutting up a pop can and see what that get's me, but I think I will have a problem of rolling the edge trying to get the action in.
 

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simply fold the shim material over to lay atop the horizontal surface of the stock, this takes up vertical play also. trim to fit of course.
 

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IMHO, when either bedding or shimming a stock to an action, it is usually best to address vertical and horizontal movement of the action seperately, taking care that the independent vertical/horizontal bedding does not interfere in the slightest with the other, future bedding.

In the case of the Mini, the instructions concerning Match bedding of the M1/M-14 rifles will be very useful. Search the web for such. In most cases, the suggested manner of bedding the action to the stock is a 3-step process, none of the preceeding steps interfering with the next step.

In my personal experience with wooden-stocked Minis, the fitment of the metal stock reinforcement to the "legs" of the barreled action is of great concern. If needed, ask how.

Most syn stocks omit the metal stock reinforcement common on Ruger Wooden stocks, so bedding the action is a bit simpler; some syn stocks not needing bedding at all.

To sum up, putting one's Mini into a tight-fiting syn stock puts one miles ahead of the typically ill-fitting wooden Ruger stocks. Bedding is seldom required. Just my opinion, and YMMV.
 

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can say that the force required to lock the trigger group down was noticeably increased from the factory force. can't say how much that reduced group size as I also bedded the gas block to fore stock fit, polished the muzzle crown and bore, did trigger job and fit the Eagle H-K style front sight and brake and Williams micro-adjust rear sight same time.
I can knock around 1 MOA off a rolled up sleeping rest on the bench with my handloads or Lapua, IMI rounds. better shot likely do better.
also I converted to straight pull bolt action to use neck sized only handloads. easily converted back to semi auto to shoot length sized or factory rounds.
there's a photo of my 30 in the gallery - along with the fitted Wenger Swiss bayonet. AFAIK the only 30 with a bayonet extant.
 

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can say that the force required to lock the trigger group down was noticeably increased from the factory force. can't say how much that reduced group size as I also bedded the gas block to fore stock fit, polished the muzzle crown and bore, did trigger job and fit the Eagle H-K style front sight and brake and Williams micro-adjust rear sight same time.
I can knock around 1 MOA off a rolled up sleeping rest on the bench with my handloads or Lapua, IMI rounds. better shot likely do better.
also I converted to straight pull bolt action to use neck sized only handloads. easily converted back to semi auto to shoot length sized or factory rounds.
there's a photo of my 30 in the gallery - along with the fitted Wenger Swiss bayonet. AFAIK the only 30 with a bayonet extant.
I don't doubt Marlin's comments. With a decently-fitting stock, the trigger latch on the Mini ought to show a definite resistance to being fully latched about 1/2" before the final latching point. That demonstrates a good vertical fitment of the stock vice the barreled action.. Sometimes, some fitment (addition of bedding compound) with respect to the trigger group itself, is required. All the bedding instructions concerning similar rifles (M1/M-14/M1A) call for the same thing.

Bedding the fore-end/gas block of the Mini is generally the last thing to do. After all, the bedded action is the fundamental thing, and the bedding of the fore-end of the Mini necessarily relies on a proper bedding of the rest of the barrreled action for best efffect.

Bedding Minis is a bit more complicated than bedding other rifles, but if one does it step-by-step, using decent instructions, not terribly difficult. Most decent syn stocks don't require bedding at all.

I certainly would practice bedding less complicated rifles before bedding a Mini/M1/M1A rifle. Walk before you run.
 

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I've yet to hear/see of any Mini owner bedding the gas block, takes a bit of time and fitting. even CajunGeo didn't attempt it. as said I did a lot of tuning same time so can't point to any single mod as being most beneficial. maybe trigger job as all know how lousy the Mini trigger is.
 

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I did it with a syn stock, to a minor good effect I also bedded the rest of the barreled action and trigger group first.

I do miss CajunGeo; we had some good conversations, my Username back than being raf.

At that point, I was trying to extract the last little bit from my 186 Mini. Most folks, especially owners of later "thick" barreled Minis with decent syn stocks won't need to do what I did.

Concur on a decent, smooth, crisply-breaking trigger being highly useful. Some Mini triggers are fairly decent out of the box, and will wear-in over time. Others just plain suck, and need some attention.
 
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