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· Formerly "raf"
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I see now. I have not tried this, and just a suggestion made from close examination of pictures of the stock.

There is a vertically oriented plunger at the rear of the hinge mechanism of the stock whose purpose is to lock the arm of the stock in the open position. Presumably the plunger has a coil spring behind it.

If the plunger and its spring can be removed and re-installed with the arm in the fully open position, there may two ways to accomplish this goal:

1) Remove the plunger and spring and install a short section of metal rod inside the plunger tube. With arm in Open position, install the "slug", and Re-install plunger and spring and secure them. This would be simpler than drilling and tapping, but requires, at least, that the plunger and spring assy can be reinstalled with the arm in the full-open position. I suggest trying this method first, if it's feasible.

2) It >>might<< be possible to drill a hole into the top of the plunger tube, thread the hole, and install a suitably sized (diameter/length) Allen head set screw which would prevent the plunger from being pushed upwards thus locking the plunger in the downward position. IOW, open stock arm, install Allen screw, and the stock arm is now locked in position. Suggest measuring the thickness of the metal where the Allen head screw is planned to be installed first. Hopefully there will be enough metal present to "catch" some threads on the Allen screw and allow this procedure to be a viable one.

If the "locking" feature is no longer needed, just remove the (long) Allen head set screw and install a much shorter Allen head set screw, thus filling the drilled hole and preventing crud from entering the inside of the plunger tube.

Suggest using Blue loc-tite on the Allen screws and ensuring the length of the Allen screws is adjusted so that the head of the (long/locking Allen screw) screw fits just a >>little<< bit below flush with the top of the hinge metal. A cautious person might fill the head of the screw and its shallow hole with epoxy or solder. An extremely cautious person might use a TIG welder and install a VERY small spot weld between screw and stock hinge mechanism. Done right, the weld/epoxy/solder could be removed with some careful grinding, thus limiting damage to the hinge mechanism and allowing the Allen screw to be removed.

Again, I have not done this, so proceed with caution and use common sense.

@Aguy
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
He is in a state where folding stocks are not allowed, he wants to pin it in the open position.
Correct

I see now. I have not tried this, and just a suggestion made from close examination of pictures of the stock.
Let me take a look with your suggestion. Thanks!

Still seeing if someone who has done it before will chime in.
 

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Are you buying it, or selling it? I noticed you once had one for sale. Do you also have to modify the pistol grip?

In case it's an option, a fixed magazine device from Mini-14/Mini-30 - Fixed Magazine Kit and a stripper clip guide from Stripper Clip Guides – Cogburn Arsenal may allow retaining the folding stock assuming no other AW law prevents it.

I have the striper clip guide on mine already (standard wood stock) and made my own version of the mag lock (just in case).
 

· Formerly "raf"
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Good points, Saudade. OP may have options unknown to him at present. All depends on how Local/State laws are written. Suggest OP read the relevant laws very carefully and assume some Cops will not be well-informed about such laws.

For example, some of my cars have RI "Antique" plates. I carry copies of relevant RI laws in the cars in case I'm stopped by an ill-informed cop who decides to hassle me or using such cars as "daily-driving" cars.

Back to firearms, I have pre-planned "options" in place to "accommodate" most every alternative proposed by the "Antis".

While fighting against all future Anti-2A laws here in the "Worker's Paradise of Rhode Island", I retain many viable alternatives in order to legally keep shooting my firearms as opposed to either turning them in or becoming a criminal.

I hope you will forgive me for not specifically mentioning my "alternatives". Anti-gunners are Members of this forum, and Anti-gunners read most all firearms forums.

Hopefully recent SCOTUS decision will put most of this nonsense to rest, but that will take some time.
 

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Anyone know how to pin the ruger folding stock in the open position?
Thanks!

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No need for solder or drilling anything. A 3/8" diameter nylon spacer 1/4" tall can have a half round sliced off and sanded to fit perfectly in the shoulder of the plunger (MA-13900) as seen in IMG-5214.JPG. You simply fill in the milled shoulder of the plunger with a glued in placed spacer to reduce the shoulder down to cross pin slot to fix the stock once the stock is fully reassembled in the locked extended position. The steps seem wordy, but it's relatively simple.

Trim a half round the width of the slot from the 3/8" diameter x 1/4" tall nylon spacer. Sand/file the nylon spacer down until the spacer fits perfectly in the milled shoulder of the plunger.

Cut/sand/file 3/32" off the bottom of the half round spacer so that the pin has a hole to pass through as shown in IMG-5214. You should be able to lay the retention pin (MA15200) in the slot.

Super glue the spacer into the shoulder of the plunger as shown with the slot left for the pin at the bottom of the plunger (the spring hole end). Let the glue fully dry.

Oil the inside of the hole the plunger goes into on the stock arm plate and place the plunger spring (MA-14400) in there.

Put in the plunger in the hole upside down (so the spring is pushing it out from the beveled top that normally rests against the stock arm) while holding the back of of the plunger (the side with the drilled hole for the spring) with a pair of pliers padded with electrical tape (to avoid marring the surface of the plunger). Placing the plunger in upside down provides a gripping surface for pliers on the inside and outside lip of the spring hole.

Twist the plunger around pressing down against the spring using the pliers to make sure the spacer in the plunger shoulder isn't binding against the hole in the stock arm plate, if you haven't sanded/filled/fitted the spacer perfectly plumb -gently twisting the plunger against the hole will scrape off the excess nylon until the spacer fits perfectly. Keep doing this until the plunger moves smoothly as it did prior to installing the spacer.

<<<This is why you put the plunger in backward backwards, to not have a plunger get stuck with a spacer binding in the stock arm plate. You an inside edge of the plunger to grip with pliers and have the spring tension available to push the plunger back out of the hole so it won't get stuck. If it gets stuck -which happened to me without the benefit of putting it in upside down, you'll need a strong magnet to yank it out -yet another reason to remember to make sure to oil it and have the spring in there to provide some action to push the plunger out if need be!>>>

Once you've confirmed the plunger with the spacer fitted smoothly moves up and down in the hole, you can take the plunger out and put it back in the correct way over the spring.

Slide the stock arm to the fully open position over the plunger and make sure the flat of the plunger is aligned properly against the flat of the stock arm.

Look through the retention pin hole and you'll likely notice just a tiny amount of the nylon spacer blocking the top edge retention pin hole (~1/32"). Place a 3/32 drill bit in the retention pin hole and gently turn it with pliers to clear the pin channel of the excess nylon spacer and you'll have a clear path for the pin to go through.

Tap the retention pin in and you're all set. The stock is fixed in place by the retention pin since the plunger no longer has the ability to travel with the glued in place shim blocking the plunger from being pressed.

If you've done it perfectly there will be zero movement of the plunger when you attempt to press it down with the retention pin inserted. This is permanent short of taking the stock apart again, tapping out the pin, removing the plunger and melting/dissolving/carefully chiseling out the glued nylon spacer from the shoulder of the stainless steel plunger.
 

· Formerly "raf"
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The above procedure should work. Now that I have seen decent pix/schematic diagrams, seems to me that a small section of rod that is trimmed to proper length and which replaces (or even fits inside) the internal spring should also do the job.

Nice to know there are fairly simple and non-destructive ways to accomplish the goal.
 

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The above procedure should work. Now that I have seen decent pix/schematic diagrams, seems to me that a small section of rod that is trimmed to proper length and which replaces (or even fits inside) the internal spring should also do the job.

Nice to know there are fairly simple and non-destructive ways to accomplish the goal.
Bob,
you CAN NOT put a rod or roll pin inside the plunger because the folding stock arm has to pass over the retention plunger before it locks. If the plunger can't depress the stock arm can't swing over it to the fully open position. That was the first thing I tried. It doesn't work.

Figuring out that filling in the shoulder of the plunger with a spacer allowed the factory retention pin for the plunger to fix it in the locked position took me about 5 minutes once I realized that. With the retention pin out, the plunger can be depressed to allow the stock arm to swing over it to the fully open position, and then when the factory retention pin is reinserted, it locks the plunger in place.
 

· Formerly "raf"
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4,263 Posts
Bob,
you CAN NOT put a rod or roll pin inside the plunger because the folding stock arm has to pass over the retention plunger before it locks. If the plunger can't depress the stock arm can't swing over it to the fully open position. That was the first thing I tried. It doesn't work.

Figuring out that filling in the shoulder of the plunger with a spacer allowed the factory retention pin for the plunger to fix it in the locked position took me about 5 minutes once I realized that. With the retention pin out, the plunger can be depressed to allow the stock arm to swing over it to the fully open position, and then when the factory retention pin is reinserted, it locks the plunger in place.
Without an example of the item before me and relying on provided pictures/schematics, I'm entirely open to new ideas. I don't claim my personal preference is the "only" way to accomplish OP's goal.

Over time, and with enough user input, the easy and simple way to do this will become apparent. Perhaps something neither you nor I have proposed.

As with all things, more one way to skin a cat.
 

· Formerly "raf"
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4,263 Posts
Bob,
you CAN NOT put a rod or roll pin inside the plunger because the folding stock arm has to pass over the retention plunger before it locks. If the plunger can't depress the stock arm can't swing over it to the fully open position. That was the first thing I tried. It doesn't work.

Figuring out that filling in the shoulder of the plunger with a spacer allowed the factory retention pin for the plunger to fix it in the locked position took me about 5 minutes once I realized that. With the retention pin out, the plunger can be depressed to allow the stock arm to swing over it to the fully open position, and then when the factory retention pin is reinserted, it locks the plunger in place.
I understand. My proposal for an inserted rod within the housing for the latching plunger requires that the stock be fully open, the pin inserted, and then the whole plunger pin and its' retention pin installed. I think this will work, but if not, perhaps your plan will work.

I figure the OP's problem is solved multiple ways, and that's all that matters.
 

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I understand. My proposal for an inserted rod within the housing for the latching plunger requires that the stock be fully open, the pin inserted, and then the whole plunger pin and its' retention pin installed. I think this will work, but if not, perhaps your plan will work.
I keep telling you that won't work because there's no way to install the plunger when the stock is fully open and if the plunger is locked in before the stock is fully open, it will lock the stock closed.
 

· Formerly "raf"
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Waher, I understand your comments, and perhaps I'm wrong. All I have to go by is exploded diagrams provided by others. These diagrams seem to indicate my approach has some utility, although that dos not rule out other approaches.
 
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