Perfect Union banner
1 - 1 of 1 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,712 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last night I was going through my tackle box trying to get it a little better organized. The problem was that I had hooks and weights spread out over different section of the tackle box. The top of the box is mostly lures and a few weights and hooks. With the bottom of the box being an assortment of different hooks, weights and other supplies.



After looking through my tackle for a little while, I realized that I fish for about 3 different types of fish - perch, bass and catfish.

For perch I use split weight and small hooks. To organize my tackle box for perch fishing gear, I bought a small double sided container. On one side of the container goes hooks, on the other side goes split weights.

Since perch stay in shallow water, I try to keep a small stock of bobbers (corks).

For bass fishing I use artificial bait, like worms and lizards. A bottom section of my tackle box is dedicated to artificial worms, on top of the worm is a small double sided container like what I keep the perch fishing stuff in. In this container hooks go on one side and weights go on the other side.

Unlike the round split weights for perch fishing, the weights used for bass fishing are oblong split weights used for making a Texas rig so the bait does not get hung up in the weeds.

For catfish I use a little bit larger hooks and some teardrop weights. A loop is tied in the fishing line, the end of the loop is inserted through the wire on the weight, then wrapper around the end of the weight. This makes the weight easy to take on and off the line.


The bottom of the tackle box is where most of the supplies are stored. The lid is mostly for lures, and items that are used a lot, such as finger nail clippers for cutting monofilament line fishing line. When I am using a weedless Texas rig for bass, and its cut off the line, the hook, weight and worm are usually thrown in the lid until the individual parts can be put into their storage places.

For respooling a reel, I like to keep a couple of spools of monofilament line in the bottom of the tackle box. the spools include:

1 spool 12# test
1 spool 20# test
1 spool 30# test

The 12# is for perch and bass fishing.
The 20# is for drop lines / jug lines / noodles.
The 30# is for one of my heavy fishing poles that I use for catfish or light saltwater use.
 
1 - 1 of 1 Posts
Top