Perfect Union banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
65108


Hi yall, This is my ongoing project. I've been reading a lot of great info from this forum and really turned my regret of buying an older mini into one I am extremely proud about. I wanted to keep that feeling of a handy, light carbine. It really is what drove me to buy this gun. In my opinion, it's what makes the Mini so cool. And the fact it just looks so damn good, with that m1 style action and wood stock. Here is a list of what I've done to improve her.

  • Ultimak Rail
  • Mcarbo Trigger Spring
  • 0.45 Gas bushing
  • Wilson Combat 1911 Buffers

For accessories, I got three John Masen 10rd mags, which work great with a little tweaking. one factory 5rd mag. For the sling, its a Magpul ms1 attached with some 550 cord to allow me to have a proper 2 point sling. I was going to just get the Spectar Gear 2 point sling but thought I would save some cash as this works just fine and is just as reliable with the proper knot. If I ever get the balls maybe I will install some small 5 slot magpul rails on each side and have the sling attached to that.

For future upgrades, id like to get a Cogburn Arsenal mini-style front sight and also replace the rear sight with a Tech Sights rr200. I wanna keep the gun as light as possible so that's why I haven't installed a strut yet. I know they help a ton with accuracy but Id thought I'd see how well she shoots in this configuration before I spend the 100 bucks on one. Also, I really don't shoot that far as most ranges by me are 25 yards and at most 100 yards. I'm also looking at micro red dots. Maybe an RMR or something a bit cheaper. Finally, I wanna throw a Surefire Mini Scout Light Pro.

I'm very proud of this gun and hope it will be passed down to my son and then his. Thanks for reading.
 

·
Formerly "raf"
Joined
·
2,777 Posts
Owning a similar 186 Pencil barreled Mini, I think you are on the right trajectory. Personally, never been a fan of typically ill-fitting OEM Ruger wooden stoks,and prefer syn stocks.

Adding a dual-strut barrel stabilizer to your pencil barrel Mini is highly suggested.

Single-strut units more for looks than accurasy, as mfr says.

If State laws allow, consider adding a Choate front sight/flash suppressor to the end of the barrel os often a good idea, for many reasons. Many here will concur with the Choate suggestion, at least.

You have knowledgible friends here, so don't be afraid to ask questions!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Owning a similar 186 Pencil barreled Mini, I think you are on the right trajectory. Personally, never been a fan of typically ill-fitting OEM Ruger wooden stoks,and prefer syn stocks.

Adding a dual-strut barrel stabilizer to your pencil barrel Mini is highly suggested.

Single-strut units more for looks than accurasy, as mfr says.

If State laws allow, consider adding a Choate front sight/flash suppressor to the end of the barrel os often a good idea, for many reasons. Many here will concur with the Choate suggestion, at least.

You have knowledgible friends here, so don't be afraid to ask questions!
Thanks for the response,

I was thinking about changing the stock, but I just like the wooden look too much. As for a dual strut, I probably will end up getting one if I'm not happy with the accuracy of my mini in this configuration. Did you do the dimple method? that is also another reason I've been holding off as I don't wanna modify the gun permanently. I also really wanted the choate flash hider, but I live in a state that doesn't allow it. also why I only have 10rd mags.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,793 Posts
Snoop, I have a 181GB model with a standard factory wood stock, like yours. Yours looks very nice! Shoot yours for a bit to see if you really need a stabilizer. Mine doesn't as it gets somewhere between 3-4 MOA, even with a hot barrel. It has reliably and consistently taken down ½-silhouette pop-up targets at 300 meters (Army range) from a supported position using M193 ammo and being operated by a fairly impatient shooter (me), using the iron sights it left the factory with. It does everything I ever wanted or expected it to do for the purposes I got it for. BTW, I have NEVER had to adjust the sights since I bought in it 1980...

YMMV for a few reasons. My particular 181GB is a low serial-numbered one (built in 1977) at a new factory with new equipment, so tolerances were tighter. There was an unconfirmed rumor that GB models got the better barrels out of QC, but there have also been studies regarding the attenuation the bayo lug and flash hider provide for reducing barrel whip.

Were I want to make it a sniper rifle, I'd wind up spending far more than I did getting a Savage Axis II (with scope and Accutrigger) in .223, and wind up no longer having a light and handy classic carbine.

Nota Bene: I don't hunt, nor do I shoot paper unless zeroing: i prefer kinetic targets like coffee-creamer jars or (more recently) toilet paper tubes filled with bird-seed or deer corn, usually at about 50-75 yards, on my farm. I do have some areas where I could shoot out to 300 yards, but beyond that is woods with critters.

I also have a 583 Tactical with the Ruger synthetic stock (to give my 181GB a break now and then). IMHO, the factory synthetic stock is nicer in terms of weight (lighter). Its LOP is about the same as the older wood stock (like you have): the current factory wood stocks have about an inch longer LOP, and are heavier.

Remarks on the Choate flash hider are spot-on, if your state will allow it, and may also help in attenuating any barrel whip you might get.

Ammo selection: there are a few things to consider here: barrel length and barrel twist being the most important in terms of accuracy. The weight of the bullet (which is really the length of the bullet) is key. My 181GB has a twist rate of 1:10, with an 18" barrel. It loves 55gr bullets because, frankly, that was what it was designed for. That is all I'll shoot out of it, although it might do okay with 62gr. My 583 Tactical has a 1:9 twist and a 16.5" barrel, and probably handles 62gr very well, but I only stock up on 55gr so I don't have to sort out which ammo for which Mini. And I have a good stockage of .223 55gr since that is all my Savage can safely and reliably shoot, the the Minis do well with it too.

This is a handy table concerning barrel twist rates. Your 186 has either a 1:7 or a 1:9 twist rate. A 1:7 twist rate does better with heavier (longer) bullets (in the 72gr range)

Lots of "science" out there that most of us might have forgotten. Consider accuracy, though: your (all) barrel will wobble and follow a sine-wave pattern doing so. The key to accuracy is the bullet exiting the barrel when it is mid-way between the upper curve and the lower curve. A strut will reduce the distance between the upper and lower points of the sine wave, but won't eliminate it. If you can find a sweet spot in terms of ammo and manufacturer that gets the bullet out of the barrel at mid-point, then you should be golden. If you are a re-loader, with patience you will find just the right powder and bullet weight to get there. I'm not a re-loader, but it really doesn't matter to me if the MOA is 2 or 3 or even 4. That's the job of my Savage.

Enjoy your Mini!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Snoop, I have a 181GB model with a standard factory wood stock, like yours. Yours looks very nice! Shoot yours for a bit to see if you really need a stabilizer. Mine doesn't as it gets somewhere between 3-4 MOA, even with a hot barrel. It has reliably and consistently taken down ½-silhouette pop-up targets at 300 meters (Army range) from a supported position using M193 ammo and being operated by a fairly impatient shooter (me), using the iron sights it left the factory with. It does everything I ever wanted or expected it to do for the purposes I got it for. BTW, I have NEVER had to adjust the sights since I bought in it 1980...

YMMV for a few reasons. My particular 181GB is a low serial-numbered one (built in 1977) at a new factory with new equipment, so tolerances were tighter. There was an unconfirmed rumor that GB models got the better barrels out of QC, but there have also been studies regarding the attenuation the bayo lug and flash hider provide for reducing barrel whip.

Were I want to make it a sniper rifle, I'd wind up spending far more than I did getting a Savage Axis II (with scope and Accutrigger) in .223, and wind up no longer having a light and handy classic carbine.

Nota Bene: I don't hunt, nor do I shoot paper unless zeroing: i prefer kinetic targets like coffee-creamer jars or (more recently) toilet paper tubes filled with bird-seed or deer corn, usually at about 50-75 yards, on my farm. I do have some areas where I could shoot out to 300 yards, but beyond that is woods with critters.

I also have a 583 Tactical with the Ruger synthetic stock (to give my 181GB a break now and then). IMHO, the factory synthetic stock is nicer in terms of weight (lighter). Its LOP is about the same as the older wood stock (like you have): the current factory wood stocks have about an inch longer LOP, and are heavier.

Remarks on the Choate flash hider are spot-on, if your state will allow it, and may also help in attenuating any barrel whip you might get.

Ammo selection: there are a few things to consider here: barrel length and barrel twist being the most important in terms of accuracy. The weight of the bullet (which is really the length of the bullet) is key. My 181GB has a twist rate of 1:10, with an 18" barrel. It loves 55gr bullets because, frankly, that was what it was designed for. That is all I'll shoot out of it, although it might do okay with 62gr. My 583 Tactical has a 1:9 twist and a 16.5" barrel, and probably handles 62gr very well, but I only stock up on 55gr so I don't have to sort out which ammo for which Mini. And I have a good stockage of .223 55gr since that is all my Savage can safely and reliably shoot, the the Minis do well with it too.

This is a handy table concerning barrel twist rates. Your 186 has either a 1:7 or a 1:9 twist rate. A 1:7 twist rate does better with heavier (longer) bullets (in the 72gr range)

Lots of "science" out there that most of us might have forgotten. Consider accuracy, though: your (all) barrel will wobble and follow a sine-wave pattern doing so. The key to accuracy is the bullet exiting the barrel when it is mid-way between the upper curve and the lower curve. A strut will reduce the distance between the upper and lower points of the sine wave, but won't eliminate it. If you can find a sweet spot in terms of ammo and manufacturer that gets the bullet out of the barrel at mid-point, then you should be golden. If you are a re-loader, with patience you will find just the right powder and bullet weight to get there. I'm not a re-loader, but it really doesn't matter to me if the MOA is 2 or 3 or even 4. That's the job of my Savage.

Enjoy your Mini!
thanks for the great advice RJF,

I totally agree, if I wanted a sniper I have a bunch of other options that would be much cheaper and just as accurate if not probably better. The whole idea of a light, handy carbine capable of being great for home defense, camping, or simply just plinking is an idea that I always found really neat. Like you 3-4 MOA is more than enough for my needs for a man-sized target at that range of 300m. It looks like my mini is a 1-7 twist based on that website, so ill have to get my hands on some heavier loads. By the way, those GB Models are sexy as hell, I'm jealous. Sounds like you have a great rifle. Again thanks for the response I appreciate it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,490 Posts
If you add a post and wing front sight, it will dramatically improve accuracy. Gives an M1/M1 Carbine/M14/M16 sight picture. I chopped the flash hiders off of the Choate front sight/flash hider combo, and it works awesome!



From this:



to this:





Struts do help if you want more precision. If you want a defensive carbine with practical accuracy, they usually are not necessary, especially if you replace the front sights like I did. Both my Minis do not have struts, and will break clay pigeons on the berm at 100 yards with monotonous regularity, and will hit the 12" 200 yard gong with every shot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,430 Posts
yeah dogg ditch the Ruger blade then install a better front sight. shimming the receiver/stock fit up and some hammer/sear surface polishing will make a lot of difference shrinking group size.
I also favor the M14 (M1A1) look the wood stock denotes of.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If you add a post and wing front sight, it will dramatically improve accuracy. Gives an M1/M1 Carbine/M14/M16 sight picture. I chopped the flash hiders off of the Choate front sight/flash hider combo, and it works awesome!



From this:



to this:





Struts do help if you want more precision. If you want a defensive carbine with practical accuracy, they usually are not necessary, especially if you replace the front sights like I did. Both my Minis do not have struts, and will break clay pigeons on the berm at 100 yards with monotonous regularity, and will hit the 12" 200 yard gong with every shot.
That accuracy sounds more than enough than I need my mini for. I'm excited to see what this gun can do in this configuration. Like you said the front sight replacement will be great and looks a lot better in my opinion. I don't know how you guys feel but I've never really liked the look of the dual clamp strut, although the socom size strut looks good and helps complete that "mini" m-14 look. by the way great looking mini, thanks for the response
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,490 Posts
Struts are good. I have used them before and they do make them more "bullseye" shooters. I actually ordered a SOCOM for my 188 Ranch. Not that I am unhappy with the practical accuracy with iron sights, but just because I may scope it some day.
 

·
Major General Chit Chat
Joined
·
1,627 Posts
Nice looking Mini. Love the wood stock. Never had a problem with the original wood stock on my Mini-30 in the 30+ years I've owned it. I've never thought of them as "Ill-fitting." Never heard of that as being an issue with the Mini in general. Synth stocks are hit or miss, mostly miss, except for the factory synth, which IMO is the best option... if you want a synthetic. But I'd stick with the wood.
 
  • Like
Reactions: snoopdog869

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Nice looking Mini. Love the wood stock. Never had a problem with the original wood stock on my Mini-30 in the 30+ years I've owned it. I've never thought of them as "Ill-fitting." Never heard of that as being an issue with the Mini in general. Synth stocks are hit or miss, mostly miss, except for the factory synth, which IMO is the best option... if you want a synthetic. But I'd stick with the wood.
I agree, my wood stock actually is very tight fitting and never would have thought of it as ill fitting, I really have to pull hard on the trigger group for it to come out unlike others I’ve seen just drop out. The wood is just so classic and really tops the gun off as truly being apart of the m1 family. Might get a synth just so I can be more rough with the gun and persevere the wood as it’s almost 30 years old now. can have some fun to spray painting it to fit my woodland area. Thanks for the response
 

·
Formerly "raf"
Joined
·
2,777 Posts
Strongly suggest you install a Stainless Steel metal butt plate: Buttplate, Stainless Steel (Replaces Factory Plastic; Incl Hardware & (gunpartscorp.com)

Fit the thing, as needed, and glass-bead blast it. De-grease with alcohol,and paint it with some tough paint. It will eventually scratch, but you can always re-paint the Stainless Steel like new, as opposed to a blued unit, and the SS unit won't rust.

One can often replace the top screw on the butt plate/stock interface with a threaded sling stud (the longer the screw shaft, the better), and a detachable sling loop, if desired.

The metal butt plate adds a little weight to the rear of the Mini, thus making the muzzle feel a bit more "lively" in the hands.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top