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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have never owned a bolt rifle before, but I am an experienced shooter. I served 8 years in the USMC, and like to shoot for sport. I love trying to push my own capabilities to see what I am made of. I can easily shoot an M16 at 500 meters because that's apart of the USMC basic rifle qualification. But I want to push my own limits by trying an 800+ meter shot. but I need to know a good bolt action rifle and set up that would make this challenge possible. Any suggestions. Also keep in mind I don't want to spend an arm and a leg to get a rifle that will do so.

Thanks for your input in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have been looking at the Remington 700 SPS tactical... but I have also heard some mixed reviews on that particular model. I know that with a bolt action properly zeroed it should not be too hard to hit the 800 meter mark. considering I have shot at the 600 meter yard line with iron sights in a standard .223 M16
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would really like to stick with a .223 so the ammo is interchangeable between it and my AR, but not a necessity. I am willing to use a different caliber rifle. I want to start with 800 meters, and as I get better start increasing the range... One of the other problems I am going to run into, is finding a range that has the capabilities of 800+
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You have a very valid point. But the lighter ammunition, cost, and so on may out weigh the negatives. Not to mention if you can shoot a .223 at 800 or 1000 meters (also given the larger caliber rifle is zeroed) it should be a walk in the park to shoot something larger. I have always had the mind set of learn to do something the hardest way you can so then every other way is easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
LoL.... Ya I would like to see that.... When I was in the USMC I was an instructor for the recruits on the rifle range, and on Fridays we would have competition to see if we could get off work early that day... We would do 500 yard line, off hand, standing. Now that was a challenge. Doable but a challenge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well thanks for the info... Just the next question is a base platform to start with... Then I will add modifications to at as funds become more available.
 

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I would not go with a .308. Your AR will shoot that good for just distance. Theres a lot of bullet drop at 500 yards on a .308. That is a lot of windage clicks. I think you need a more powerful round like one of the magnums or even a .270 might work better.
 

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I would not go with a .308. Your AR will shoot that good for just distance. Theres a lot of bullet drop at 500 yards on a .308. That is a lot of windage clicks. I think you need a more powerful round like one of the magnums or even a .270 might work better.
Tell that to the Palma shooters :lol: 308 Win is ALL they shoot (and their running iron sights at 800)
The 223 drops even more (than the 308W), and simply runs out of steam at those ranges.
You will find that .277 bullets in high BC designs make hens teeth look common.
There is a reason that 6.5mm, 30cal and 338 bullets dominate at the longer ranges, and to put it quite simply, BC rules. Add enough case capacity to keep them supersonic at the longest ranges, without beating the shooter to a pulp, and you'll find what the majority of LR target shooters are using
 

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to the original poster -

you want to try a shot at 800, and not spend an arm and a leg?

go get yourself a Savage model 11 in 30.06, put a decent 10x scope on it - and have at it... and have fun.

with a box of ammo or three - you'll be under a grand.

you don't need a high zoot bull barreled remington 700 tactical to shoot far, you don't need a 1000 dollar scope, you don't need a magnum caliber round, things like this are great if you decide to embrace the art of LR shooting and competition

what you do need to get started is a decent rifle (which the savage 11 is) a round that has the weight and balls to go 1000 yards (which the 30.06 does)
and a guy behind the trigger that knows the fundamentals of good marksmanship (which you already have, Marine.) from there it's lots of practice (read: "ammo") till you and your new toy are communicating properly.

Bonus: you also will end up with a fairly light, easy to hump deer/hog gun that can put some meat on your table if the need ever came up

for the record - my best shot at a "long range" was a 650 yard (confirmed later on GPS, I guessed it in the field to be "around 600" or so) shot on a feral goat.
I did hit him first shot - and it was a good enough hit to kill him. I did hit him lower than I wanted due to the ranging estimation error.
the shot was taken with a 90's vintage savage 110 in .270 that I bought off a buddy for 100 bucks shooting a 130 grain Hornady Superperformance interbond

also for the record - normally I wouldn't have taken the shot, as I wasn't 100% confident I had the chops to make the shot... but this was an eradication hunt and the was a guy with a shotgun in a helicopter that would have finished off the animal had I botched it
 

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I like the Savage BVSS Mod 12. They are a little heavy but are very accurate gun.Go to Savage web to check it out.Also the BTCSS I like the thumb hole stock it is a little less weight.
 

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For awhile I had a Sako in 30-378 Weatherby. My loads I had were pretty hot, running around 3400-3450fps. It was akin to shooting a laser. Alas, it also cost about $4 a rd to reload and I didn't cotton too much to the barrel wear.

If I return to a bolt action someday I will likely look into something in 6.5, like the 260 Remington or 6.5 Creedmore. Probably 260 Rem, I feel like I could reach out there if needed...
 

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For several years, the standard for F-Open shooting has been the 6.5mm-284, loaded above the maximum recommended in any manual. It is very accurate, but a barrel-burner, losing its competitive accuracy after about 600 rounds. In recent years, several competitors have switched to 7mm WSM and 300 WSMs in an attempt to gain an advantage in “shooting through the wind,” with some degree of success.

The key to successful long range shooting (in addition to precise reloads) is reading the conditions, wind, boil from heat, etc. and being able to adjust for it with each shot. Very few hunters are capable of doing that or know how and even experienced target shooters have problems on a regular basis. We are reminded of a local 1,000 yard competition where Mary held on the center of the target next to her (that is 12 feet to the right) in order to hit the X-ring of her target; such is the effect of a 10 mph cross-wind.

The British F-Open team used 7mm’s (.284 bore size) to win the F-Open World Championship in 2010, but burned through more than a dozen barrels to do it. At $600 a pop for each barrel, that is pretty pricey for a gold cup. Derek Rodgers of Albuquerque, NM, used a custom built Charley Robertson rifle (Score High Gunsmithing, Albuquerque, NM) chambered for the .300 WSM to win the 2010 F-Open US Nationals. Larry Bartholome just won the 2011 F-Open Creedmoor in Ireland with an Alan Warner rifle (Warner Tool Co., Keene, NH) chambered in .284 Win., using expanded 6.5x284 cases. Larry is an incredible shooter who can read the wind like a meteorologist and he is only 70 years old.

Only time will tell whether the .300 WSM, 7mm’s (multiple case options) or straight .284’s will ultimately supplant the 6.5mm-284. The 2013 F-Class World Championships at the NRA’s Whittington Center in Raton, New Mexico should be very interesting and provide some indication as to whether the 6.5mm-284 will remain the cartridge of choice in F-Open competition. It won’t surprise these writers if the 7mm (.284) “wins” out, as there are a half dozen superior bullets for it, including the superb Berger 180 grain VLD with an amazing 0.684 BC.

The 6.5mm-284 (a wildcat) when loaded with an appropriate bullet is a good hunting cartridge, but presents no advantage over more readily available cartridges. As Chuck Hawks has pointed out: “With the SAAMI standardized .260 Remington, 6.5mm Rem. Mag. and immensely popular .270 Winchester all being factory loaded in the U.S., it is a little hard to see just where the 6.5mm-284 . . . fits into the modern scheme of things (for hunting) in North America.” If you are looking for a magnum caliber for hunting, the .257 Weatherby and .270 Weatherby are hard to beat in the Vanguard rifle.

OR you can try and wade your way through all this to make some decision.

It might help to work up some loads and review the ballistics yourself. I use a freebie program for windows called Pointblank. It has been fairly accurate to what I see at the range when I'm shooting. Good luck. Tell us what you decide too.

My "long range" gun is a Marlin XL7 chambered in 30.06 with a 6 to 16 power scope. I've only shot it out to 200 yards so far. It is set for 0 at 200. I load my own rounds for this gun. I would like to go over to the long distance range sometime when I get the time.
 
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