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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I suddenly realized that I want a bolt rifle. Maybe all this gun control talk helped convince me. After studying the ballistics, I think I want a 308. Believing in Jeff Cooper's teachings and owning a Mini 14 in scout configuration and an M1A Scout, I am naturally arrived at the GSR. After holding (okay, fondling) one, I am all but convinced. I understand that there are smoother actions than the Ruger 77. I understand that the 16.5" barrel costs the 308 about 300 fps. I get that the idiot from New York doesn't think I need ten rounds. And I understand that it makes both a big fireball and a loud bang. Still like it.

I also like my buddy's Ruger American. Super light, minimalist, compact version available, and the price is definitely right. That got me looking at alternatives like the Savage Axis, Weatherby Vanguard Carbine, Mossberg MVP. That led to the Remington 700. All great guns. All can probably print smaller groups than the GRS.

That led me to this thought. Am I ever going to be a guy who can or will study the wind, memorize the ballistics, dope the scope and ring the 600 yard gong ten times in a row? Maybe, but if the SHTF, and that's really why I'm preparing all this, am I really going to take a 600 yard shot on a deer? Or if things really go bad, am I going to defend my land from 600 yards? Or am I going to reinforce my position and take better shots at 200 or 100 yards?

I suspect the latter. So does that mean having a sub-MOA gun is less important? Does that mean having a gun that shoots minute of paper plate or even minute of man is adequate?

And why even screw with a 308 bolt gun? Why not settle in with the M1A and take out targets in nice cadence from 200 yards? I still want a bolt gun; I guess that's why. Lots of questions, but here is the real one. If I will wait to take shots at 100-200 yards, should I let accuracy over ride my preference for the GSR?
 

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I get your desire and there are many options. A short barreled rifle does have a pretty loud bark. Having one with a removable mag is also a nice option. A friend has a Rem 700 with the mag conversion. Very nice. I have an Enfield No 4 MK2 that fits the same as the Scout. And like you I wouldn't mind considering the Scout in the least.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Adding a detachable box magazine conversion seems like a no brainer for the Remington 700. At least for my philosophy of use. Wonder why nobody makes a conversion that accepts M14 mags? Too wide I suppose.
 

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I suddenly realized that I want a bolt rifle. Maybe all this gun control talk helped convince me. After studying the ballistics, I think I want a 308. Believing in Jeff Cooper's teachings and owning a Mini 14 in scout configuration and an M1A Scout, I am naturally arrived at the GSR. After holding (okay, fondling) one, I am all but convinced. I understand that there are smoother actions than the Ruger 77. I understand that the 16.5" barrel costs the 308 about 300 fps. I get that the idiot from New York doesn't think I need ten rounds. And I understand that it makes both a big fireball and a loud bang. Still like it.

I also like my buddy's Ruger American. Super light, minimalist, compact version available, and the price is definitely right. That got me looking at alternatives like the Savage Axis, Weatherby Vanguard Carbine, Mossberg MVP. That led to the Remington 700. All great guns. All can probably print smaller groups than the GRS.

That led me to this thought. Am I ever going to be a guy who can or will study the wind, memorize the ballistics, dope the scope and ring the 600 yard gong ten times in a row? Maybe, but if the SHTF, and that's really why I'm preparing all this, am I really going to take a 600 yard shot on a deer? Or if things really go bad, am I going to defend my land from 600 yards? Or am I going to reinforce my position and take better shots at 200 or 100 yards?

I suspect the latter. So does that mean having a sub-MOA gun is less important? Does that mean having a gun that shoots minute of paper plate or even minute of man is adequate?

And why even screw with a 308 bolt gun? Why not settle in with the M1A and take out targets in nice cadence from 200 yards? I still want a bolt gun; I guess that's why. Lots of questions, but here is the real one. If I will wait to take shots at 100-200 yards, should I let accuracy over ride my preference for the GSR?
Hi Headedtotexas;

Way I see it is that the GSR has several advantages as a bail out survival rifle on both the Rem 700 when its set up as a sniping rig and over the M1A pretty much always.
1. Big one is weight; my Rem 700 SPS Tac with scope, bipod, cheek pad, and sling is one hefty piece of gear. Similarly my M1A isn't exactly light. As a bail out rifle where you may be facing big predators the GSR looks mighty impressive - powerful, robust as all get out and light.
2. A second advantage is mechanical simplicity - here its a wash with the Rem 700 but distinctly easier to stock spares and maintain in the field than an M1A. As a bail in rifle I prefer the M1A, but that simple bolt action is going to be very easy to maintain on the move.
3. Then there are the legal issues; outside of NY I think you're okay and even there you just have to remember to load no more than 7 in your magazine (I really can't believe I had to type that). Still, its a rifle thats GTG pretty much anywhere you can have a rifle. That's no mean thing in these troubled days, in which even such sedate classics as the 10/22 and the mini 14 are on the verge of getting banned in Kali.
4. Lastly you have the corrosion resistance if you go stainless. My Rem 700 is not as corrosion resistant, nor my M1A. Not dissing either, but just facing facts.

Here's the irony - I've admired the GSR for some time but never got around to buying one, though I do have both a Rem 700 and an M1A. However, it is on the "to do" list since I really do think it offers some useful capabilities and is built IMHO around a different POU. The Rem 700 when kitted out like mine is a true sniper's rifle, and the M1A is a true battle rifle. The GSR is a corrosion resistant, tough as nails survival rifle for situations where you need the extra "oomph" to put down a grizzly.

And it looks cool as all get-out.

If you want one and can afford it get one. Then enjoy!
And don't forget to post pics.

All the best,
Grumpy
 

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Accuracy is kind of subjective, meaning it all depends what you want/need/desire out of a weapon.

By all means the choice is yours because you're the one that has to live with your decisions.......not us.

I say just buy the one you want, you'll find a good enough excuse iffin you want it bad enough.

If you are truly wanting accuracy though, you have lots of other options in good quality rifles in the 308 cartridge and probably less money.

Buy what you want, when you want it, if not work hard and save for it, it then becomes more endearing to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
And it looks cool as all get-out.
You know, that's what it comes down to more than accuracy. I appreciate the feedback guys. I know there are rifles out there that shoot much tighter groups. And there are rifles out there with smoother action out of the box. There are also rifles out there that compromise a lot in the name of cost and design too. In the end, I think you're right, I can make the GSR deliver the lead on target that I need.

I used to play a lot of golf. Back then I used to study the games of tour players a lot too. It was (and still is) clear to me that the club and ball have little to do with the outcome. Yes, at the top of the game, the club and ball have an impact that warrants all that is spent on them, but at the serious amateur level, it comes down to focus, concentration, conditioning and will. Accuracy isn't much different. When the SHTF, my bean bags won't make the BOB list. Neither will the bench rest or the spotting scope. Accuracy comes down to nerve, technique and practice.
 

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I used to play a lot of golf. Back then I used to study the games of tour players a lot too. It was (and still is) clear to me that the club and ball have little to do with the outcome. Yes, at the top of the game, the club and ball have an impact that warrants all that is spent on them, but at the serious amateur level, it comes down to focus, concentration, conditioning and will. Accuracy isn't much different. When the SHTF, my bean bags won't make the BOB list. Neither will the bench rest or the spotting scope. Accuracy comes down to nerve, technique and practice.
+1000 Excellent post! Really cuts right to the heart of it - at 100 yds a fine rifleman with a $350 Wally World grade Marlin .30-30 will best a newb with a $2000 AR, etc. That's one of my pet peeves, when someone starts going on about the "best" this or that. Most everything does something well (okay, Chauchat's reportedly break better'n almost anything but still they're "special" that way). Just gotta pick the tool for the task. If you're after a light weight legal almost anywhere bail out rifle that can drop anything in N.America and requires very low field maintenance, you're there with the GSR.

And that rifle really does look cool with the gray laminate stock and stainless. Friend of mine back in Illinois has one and I got a chance to play with it a little last time I was up there. Droooool.

Best,
Grumpy
 

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I think you are gonna wanna put the guns in your hands before you decide. I have a perfect semi auto example. My buddy has a fairly decent AR and a fairly ****ty WASR. He put allota time in the AR with optics and mall ninja crap but kept the WASR stock as it comes. While taking a group of guys out shooting one of the guys couldnt hit the broad side of a barn with the AR no matter how hard he tried but was spot on with Wasr

So I have to add, its not only skill or quality of the tool. Its also what tool fits your hand best.

BTW it pissed my buddy off that people could shoot his 300 AK clone better than they could shoot his 1000+ dollar AR.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Good points. The best marksman can't hit the target with a poor weapon until he's put a lot of work into fixing what made it poor.

Hadn't noticed this until now, but Ruger's new stainless GSR model has an 18" barrel instead of the original 16.5".

 

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An expert marksman is liable to out shoot you no matter what gun he picks up....:D

Ruger M77's have really strong actions and extractors and they are quality weapons. You won't go wrong.

FWIW
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
An expert marksman is liable to out shoot you no matter what gun he picks up.
Definitely. I hold no illusions about being a marksman, or even a good shot. I aspire to being a good shot, but I recognize that I have a long way to go. Enjoying the journey.

And at the risk of exposing my somewhat suspect internet search skills, I discovered a rare breed of GSR:



It is apparently a walnut stocked distributor exclusive Cabela's sold at one point. Gee, that thing looks about perfect.
 

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Definitely. I hold no illusions about being a marksman, or even a good shot. I aspire to being a good shot, but I recognize that I have a long way to go. Enjoying the journey.

And at the risk of exposing my somewhat suspect internet search skills, I discovered a rare breed of GSR:



It is apparently a walnut stocked distributor exclusive Cabela's sold at one point. Gee, that thing looks about perfect.
Thats crazy looking. I like it
 

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I think you are gonna wanna put the guns in your hands before you decide. I have a perfect semi auto example. My buddy has a fairly decent AR and a fairly ****ty WASR. He put allota time in the AR with optics and mall ninja crap but kept the WASR stock as it comes. While taking a group of guys out shooting one of the guys couldnt hit the broad side of a barn with the AR no matter how hard he tried but was spot on with Wasr.
Hi whofarted;

Yep, I've seen that same sort of thing happen myself and usually attribute it to the superiority of simplicity. Put too many bells and whistles and it just plain doesn't seem to work as well. Even for a precision shooting rifle, every dingus you add on has to have an application that's part of the task or it seems to take away from the whole.

On the AR, I've seen a bunch turned into boat anchors that outweigh my M1A. Makes it hard to keep a heavy unbalanced rifle steady offhand whereas the AK has near perfect balance in its stock configuration. One other thing about the AK is that I've yet to see a really s***** trigger on one, and the WASR's usually come with a nice clean Tapco G2. All in all the fact that a stock WASR outshot a mall-ninja'd AR doesn't surprise me.

Best,
Grumpy
PS Your buddy did well on his WASR - its now about a $900 rifle, maybe higher in Kali. If he wants his rifle to really look it, he should pick up a Polish front handguard set for around $50, a Roningrips pistol grip for a little over $20, then redo the wood in tung oil and enjoy. Below are the before/after pics (lower rifle is the WASR). Before is stock wood with tung oil finish (after light sanding to get the grit and dirt out).
 

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IMHO, I prefer my FN PBR .308 with a 20" bull barrel sporting a Nikon 6-18x40 over a big semi MBR. It has plenty of power and range to reach the realistic 200-400 range shots I could ever need.

I am NOT interested is being in a shootout with anyone. I'm not looking to "Run N Gun" nor get monster "Trigger Time". I don't need 8-10 20 or 30 round mags and actually prefer the idea of just slipping away, changing my plan or minding my own business.

However, if I get backed into a corner or need to slow or harass an element I can. I'll keep my bolt and let the youngin' "run n gun".

 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I am NOT interested is being in a shootout with anyone.
I'm not interested in being in a shootout either Will, especially with you if that thing is pointing my way! Got a feeling we're on the same side though. I've read good things about the FN and certainly Nikon scopes (being a Nikon guy in the photography world). Given the choice, getting out of a shootout without shooting is best, but should the time come when a shootout is thrust upon us, thanks perhaps to a bellicose form of persuasion practiced by the slave states at some point in the future, I'm interested in being prepared.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
A little more research revealed that the walnut stocked stainless GSR seen at Cabela's in 2011 is the limited edition Ruger model 06804. I believe they made only 100 of them.



Beautiful eh? Sadly, with the advent of Ruger's new stainless 18" barrel model, I doubt the model 06804 will be made again any time soon. Wonder if anyone would sell such a thing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
One of my LGS had two on Saturday. Never heard about them. And they were the rare green laminate AccuSport distributor exclusives. Ouch.

 

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I shoot a remington 788 308 it is sighted in dead on on at 300 yards. If it gives you any clue how I shoot. I have dropped deer at 400 yards with one shot. Killed Elk at 300 yards. 308 is an awesome caliber.
I also shoot a 7 mm mag rem BDL. . I like the 7mm because it shoots a lot flatter.when sighted in at 300 yards you dont have to think. Anything out to 400 yards if you place the shot on the animal it is going to hit it . Killed Elk smak dead at 600 yards.
But 308 is just as bad ass just have to fuggure bullet drop.
Learn how to shoot a bolt .308 and you will amase yourself. They are tack drivers.
Some of the best snipers in the world used 308. Google Carlos Hathcock
 
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My favorite rifle chambered in .308 Winchester is my Ruger 77 MKII RSI, International. I have a Leupold VariX II, 1x4 scope mounted on it. Though intended mostly for hunting, the little carbine could be used in "survival" and/or self-defense situations. I like the robust-sized, Mauser-type extractor, the "controlled" round feed, the 3-position, easily accessed safety, the iron sights and the Mannlicher-style stock on this rifle. Though the relatively short barrel produces lots of bark, it is plenty accurate enough to put the bite of a 165 grain soft-point on a whitetail just where I want it to go.
The only real draw-back to this set-up is the impossibility of using quick-detachable swivels to remove a sling quickly. When I'm hunting from a stand or moving through heavy cover while hunting, I like to be able to remove and replace the sling as fast and as simple as possible. The "loop" on the front of the full-length stock effectively precludes any chance of this happening. I only wish someone made a Velcro-style strap for securing it to the front part of the stock.
 
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