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Speaking of loctite, my stock rear sight came loose after a few mags when I first got my Mini14. A drop of loctite (blue) fixed that. Just keep an eye on the rear sight to see if it loosens up.
 

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I suggest assuming nothing as to Loc-Tite being applied by the factory. IMHO, the factory is cranking out as many Minis as they can, and likely some short-cuts are being made.
 

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The absolute torque doesn't matter as you are going to search for it anyway. As long as the lock washer doesn't make things inconsistent, it should work. I will give it a try when I get hold of the 187.

-TL

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The absolute torque doesn't matter as you are going to search for it anyway. As long as the lock washer doesn't make things inconsistent, it should work. I will give it a try when I get hold of the 187.

-TL

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

With all respect, torque on the gas block screws does seem to make a distinct differemce, sandog has some useful threads on exactly that subject.

Any sort of "lock washer" will make the final torque "obscured" due to the effects of the lock washer, Flat washers, only, if one wants to obtain a reliable torque measurement.
 

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With all respect, torque on the gas block screws does seem to make a distinct differemce, sandog has some useful threads on exactly that subject.

Any sort of "lock washer" will make the final torque "obscured" due to the effects of the lock washer, Flat washers, only, if one wants to obtain a reliable torque measurement.
The torque does seem making difference. But 25 in-lb on your rifle may not work for mine. I still need to experiment to find out the optimal torque for my rifle.

-TL

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 · (Edited)
Thanks all for the great advice, and thanks Sandog for showing me what these rifles are capable of with some fine tuning. The crown looks good as far as I can tell. I looked it over with a magnifying glass and I don’t see any obvious issues. I’ll keep it in the back of my mind though.

The trigger is not bad. I didn’t gauge it, but my guess is that it’s about 6 pounds, and it breaks pretty cleanly.

The rifle throws the brass into the adjoining county, and as mentioned the extra vibration is certainly contributing to loosening things up. I’ve ordered a set of bushings to reduce the gas flow.

I got some loktite today and applied it to all of the scope mount screws. I’m hoping that helps.

Now…about the gas block…I found this…
Am I seeing this right? It looks like the gas block gap isn’t even. Does that look normal?
Air gun Trigger Wood Shotgun Gun barrel


here’s the other side for reference,,,
Wood Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Hardwood


i can be perfectly happy with 3 inches at a hundred yards, that’s plenty of accuracy for my intended use…10” not so much. 10” could turn into a solid miss on an important shot.
 

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My stainless 30 Tactical had about a 6 pound trigger pull along with a rough gritty second stage take up. I bought the MCarbo secondary spring and installed. Also lightly cleaned up the secondary sear interface with a light polish.

Brought the trigger down to a perfect, clean 4.5 pounds and a butter smooth secondary take up. Very easy job that can be done by anyone with a bit of mechanical aptitude. No touching the sears or any danger of ruining the trigger.

Gun Doc's video will educate you on how the trigger works. MCarbo also has installation videos.
Bepe


Blue Electric blue Wood Font Fashion accessory
Hand Blue Finger Nail Wood
 

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Now…about the gas block…I found this…
Am I seeing this right? It looks like the gas block gap isn’t even. Does that look normal? View attachment 65803

here’s the other side for reference,,, View attachment 65804

i can be perfectly happy with 3 inches at a hundred yards, that’s plenty of accuracy for my intended use…10” not so much. 10” could turn into a solid miss on an important shot.
As regards the gap between the gas block and its' cap, that can possibly be addressed when you replace the gas bushings.

To begin, re-read sandog's thread(s) on desired torque values for the gas block screws. The gas block itself, excepting the gas port oriface and its' bore for the barrel, is not a precision-machined part. As long as the gas block is properly oriented on the barrel, so that the gas pipe attached to the gas block does not interfere with its' hole in the op-rod, then ensuring roughly the same gap on both sides between gas block and gas block cap will be sufficient. A little variance in the gap between gas block and its' cap is tolerable, as long as the gas block is properly located, and the screws are properly and evenly torqued.

FWIW, I generally install the gas bushing, gas block, then gas block cap. Then thread the screws in so that one can just slide and twist the assembled unit on the barrel. I then wiggle the gas block forward on the barrel. This "seats" the circular hole for the gas bushing on the circular gas bushing. Going by "Feel" one can sense when the gas block is moved as far forwards as the gas bushing will allow. Check for any interference/mis-alignment between gas pipe and op-rod, and adjust to eliminate such interference. Then begin tightening process with the gas block screws.

The gas pipe on the gas block has some "wiggle" designed-in. Best, I think, to locate the gas block so that it does not interfere with the hole in the op-rod for the gas pipe, right from the beginning. IDK if the assemblers at Ruger take all this bother when assembling the rifles; I suspect they use "GO/NO-GO" gauges, or perhaps just eyeball things.

Needless to say, one should install the gas block assy with both stock and handguard absent.

Others might disagree with some or all of the above, and I look forwards to their responses.
 

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My stainless 30 Tactical had about a 6 pound trigger pull along with a rough gritty second stage take up. I bought the MCarbo secondary spring and installed. Also lightly cleaned up the secondary sear interface with a light polish.

Brought the trigger down to a perfect, clean 4.5 pounds and a butter smooth secondary take up. Very easy job that can be done by anyone with a bit of mechanical aptitude. No touching the sears or any danger of ruining the trigger.

Gun Doc's video will educate you on how the trigger works. MCarbo also has installation videos.
Bepe


View attachment 65811 View attachment 65812
Having a crisp, smooth trigger is invaluable on any firearm. The Mini trigger is much like the M1/M1A/M-14 trigger, so there are a lot of folks who are capable of minor tuning. Experts on the Mini trigger are not as common as one would like.

I have found that I can do bettter with a clean, smooth 8# trigger than a gritty, creep-prone 5# trigger.

Suggest going lower than about 5# of trigger weight might not be safe for use. M1 (and similar triggers) are an instant "DISQUAL" if their pull weight goes beneath 4-1/2#, ostensibly due to safety issues.

For home defense use, and other high-stress use, I suggest not reducing the trigger pull weight too low, in order to prevent unintentional discharges. Likely cleaning-up the innards of a stock trigger, polishing some obvious stuff, and carefully re-lubing it properly will likely be the best alternative. for most folks.

Personally, I have found that having a way to stop trigger travel after sear release has been a valuable enhancement for my personal accuracy in a variety of firearms, both rifles and pistols. Usually called an "over-travel stop screw".

That's why I sent my Mini Trigger group off to ASI for one of their trigger jobs, including such an "over-travel stop screw". Very satisfied with they delivered, at a reasonable price.

Your needs--and your budget--might differ.

Best, simple, thing to do before embarking on any Trigger Group upgrades is to completely dis-assemble the trigger group, thoroughly clean it, lightly polish any surfaces,such as on the sides of the hammer and sear, ect.., and carefully lube it with the appropriate lubes. As a general rule, rotating components use appropriate oil, and sliding components use appropriate grease. Words to live by: "Do the easy stuff first, then re-evaluate".

Adding a "Trigger Shoe", which is a device that attaches to the trigger and which increases the width of the trigger can be a suprisingly effective measure. Basically, such a device "fools" your finger/brain into thinking the trigger is lighter than it actually is. No substituute for a clean trigger, though.
 

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4 1/2 pounds with a Factory break is plenty heavy enough. If you have an AD with that weight pull......you shouldn't be allowed to be around guns. No polishing or touching of the sears. Just as they left the Factory. Takes a deliberate action to get it to break.

I also believe the CMP / DCM standard for trigger weight is 4 1/2 pounds. Anything less is a DQ.

For what it is worth.... I sent my blue 30 Tactical trigger out to the West Coast gun shop that is mentioned here quite often. That was before I watched the Gun Doc video. Upon return it was a hair over 3 pounds. Now THAT trigger was way too light for a working gun. After I put the MCarbo spring in my stainless 30 I pulled apart the trigger on the blue 30 to "see" what had been done.

The secondary spring had been "clipped" about 3 coils. I installed the Ruger OEM spring from the Stainless 30 into the blue 30 to see what the results would be. Much to my surprise, the blue 30 trigger measured the same 4 1/2 pounds as the stainless 30.

It was a bit crisper in breaking. I'll assume the sears probably had been polished a bit while out West.

Bepe
 

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4 1/2 pounds with a Factory break is plenty heavy enough. If you have an AD with that weight pull......you shouldn't be allowed to be around guns. No polishing or touching of the sears. Just as they left the Factory. Takes a deliberate action to get it to break.

I also believe the CMP / DCM standard for trigger weight is 4 1/2 pounds. Anything less is a DQ.

For what it is worth.... I sent my blue 30 Tactical trigger out to the West Coast gun shop that is mentioned here quite often. That was before I watched the Gun Doc video. Upon return it was a hair over 3 pounds. Now THAT trigger was way too light for a working gun. After I put the MCarbo spring in my stainless 30 I pulled apart the trigger on the blue 30 to "see" what had been done.

The secondary spring had been "clipped" about 3 coils. I installed the Ruger OEM spring from the Stainless 30 into the blue 30 to see what the results would be. Much to my surprise, the blue 30 trigger measured the same 4 1/2 pounds as the stainless 30.

It was a bit crisper in breaking. I'll assume the sears probably had been polished a bit while out West.

Bepe
"Clipping" springs is almost always a sure sign of improper technique. Most Experts substitute an identical length spring of a different "weight", as is accepted "best practice".

I rebuilt a Norinco 1911, and got educated about spring weights and spring lengths right quick.

Following accepted best practices, the Norinco runs like a champ. Just like my Ruger P-90, although the Norinco is not quite as accurate as the Ruger. Ruger is just as accurate as my S&W 625 Custom Shop .45 ACP revolver, which I consider my personal "Gold Standard".

Getting back to trigger weight of pull, the Mil has decided that for the average Soldier/Marine, a relatively heavy weight of "pull" is desirable, likely in order to prevent Inadvertant discharges under stressful conditions.

I rather agree. Better (safer) a heavy-weight trigger, than a light weight trigger, prone to inadvertant discharges. "Burst" trigger arrangement in many M-16s adds to trigger weight issues. But, a "Heavy' trigger can be just as clean and crisp as a lighter-weight trigger in any Civvy rifle. Mil types have to deal with what they are issued.

I might make the point that most Soldiers and Marines don't receive nearly the trigger time that they should get.

In a "high-stress" situation, I would prefer the clean and crisp "heavier-weight" trigger, all things considered.

YMMV.
 

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I'll agree Bob. In order for handguns to "qualify" for the roster in my state a heavy trigger pull is required. My CCW gun, Sig 938 Legion, measures over 5 pounds. Yet the break is clean and crisp. With regular practice it has become a "non issue" to me. You get used to the break with regular practice and your muscle memory kicks in. I usually race a timer on a combat target, when it goes to the range. No problems whatsoever in shooting that gun "lights out".

That said. 4 1/2 pounds on a working gun is not TOO light. About as light as I would go on either a rifle or pistol used for potential social purposes. Proficiency can be mastered with a heavier trigger with regular practice.

Bepe

Orange Sleeve Font Red Wood
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Thanks for the insight Rlbob. that makes good sense. I will follow your advice. And thanks all for the info on the trigger. Waiting on parts now. I’ll report back when I have the bushing installed and can get to the range. This is great stuff and I really appreciate your expertise.
 

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I'm in the camp for cleaning things up. Although when apart I used an Arkansas stone on rubbing parts, and I do mean barely. I am very satisfied with how it now feels. It's clean and I know when it's going to break. I wouldnt want the pull any lighter on a working gun that it is.
 
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