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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have not posted much here as I am "relatively new" to the Ruger Mini platform.
I bought my first Mini 14 seven or eight years ago and recently acquired a new Mini 30.
I just ran across this on Ebay and never knew there was such a thing.
Can anyone tell me if this was a Ruger Factory item or aftermarket?
It is a vintage Ruger Mini 14 side sling gas block attachment assembly.
ENJOY:
Vintage Ruger mini 14 Side Sling Swivel Block assembly blue steel (ebay.com)
Wood Gun barrel Tints and shades Gun accessory Revolver
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
After some research last night, mainly digging through threads here and on AR15.com I found that a member here who was a gunsmith in Estacada OR Tim Copeland built a few of those as well back in the early 2000’s.
I was merely lurking here back then after I shot a friends Mini 14 for the first time and fell in love with the rifle.
Unfortunately before I was able to obtain my first Ruger 14 Mr. Cooeland passed away. As I understood then Copeland did wonderful work on the Mini’s. To bad for me because his shop is only about a half hour drive from my home.
 

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Formerly "raf"
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It ought not be too difficult to silver-solder an appropriate metal tube on the side of the lower gas block, and then install an appropriate sling "ring" into it. This would allow the gas block and side sling swivel to fit any barrel for which the gas block was originally intended, be the barrel straight, tapered, or even an unusual diameter.

Will need to re-finish the item after silver-soldering, though.
 

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That is an Ruger original factory gas block for a factory folder. You can tell by the lack of a web under the barrel. If the sling swivel accommodates a 1 1/4" sling, it is from a facrtory side folder that was a GB model. I have one I found and put on my mini. I just used a stud on the side of the4 stock.





 

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One can certainly use a common sling stud attached to the side of the fore-end of the stock. Care must be taken to not interfere with the Op-rod's proper cycling. Your call as to whether to use wood-threaded sling stud, or machine-screw-threaded stud. I believe I would trust a machine-screw sling stud, (secured with a thin nut + Loc-tite on the inside of a syn stock fore-end) most of all. YMMV.

Being very cautious about such things, I suggest using a machine screw-thread stud + Nylock nut+ washer when installing a sling stud into the side of the rear buttstock of a syn stock. The plastic there.while strong, is rather thin. On the bottom, in the conventional sling mounting point on a syn stock, I apply some epoxy "Plumber's putty, densely packed, around the protruding shaft of the sling stud screw. Sometimes this is not necessary, if sufficient plastic exists at this point. Adding the epoxy, tightly packed around the protruding shaft of the sling stud screw greatly enhances the "pull-out" strength at that point. Also prevents protruding screw shaft from puncturing plastic baggies in which emergency items are stored, and also prevents one from scratching one'st hand when fishing out emergency supplies stored inside the hollow butt stock.
ETA: same principles apply if installing the sling swivel at the top of the buttstock.

I admit to "over-thinking" this a bit, but OTOH, I have complete confidence in such sling attachment points. YMMV.
 

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I mount my side swivels in the stock as RiBob outlined above. I'd rather not have the sling pulling on the side of the gas block when using the sling as a shooting aid.
No doubt the sling mounted on the side of the stock still exerts uneven pressure on the gas block, but the further away from the gas block the better.
Mine have been secure, nut on the inside of the swivel stud, or what I do, secure a short piece of rail with the swivel mounted to that.

One "improvement" I could add to the mounting locations that imarangemaster showed above in the pics, is don't place the back swivel on the side of the stock. I place it on the top.
Swivels both mounted on the side are the perfect place to put them if the Mini will always be against your back.
Being on the side makes the Mini lay very flat against your back.

But what if you have the Mini slung across your chest in the ready position ?
With both front and rear mounted on the side, the Mini will want to roll away from you, it would end up nearly upside down if not for the 20 or 30 round magazine digging into your belly.
That's why I put the rear swivel on top of the stock.

My daughter is holding on to the Mini here, but if she needed to let it go it would just hang, with a slight tendency to want to roll away. With both sling points on the side, it would really roll away and that mag would be poking you hard.
Ideally I could put both swivels on top, but you'd have to connect the swivel to a barrel band swivel set up, where it would drop the sling out of the line of sight when the rifle is shouldered.


One cool thing if you want to do this kind of sling set up and you have an older style wood stock, is that you can just replace the top screw that holds the buttplate on with a Mini sling swivel. Same size and thread wood screw and you don't have to drill an extra hole in your stock.
If you want to return the Mini back to original, just unscrew the swivel, put it back on the bottom of the stock, and replace the buttplate screw.

All my Minis have the side/top mount, along with Vickers Blueforce slings.

One lefty for me, and the other two are set up for right hand, one is my daughters Mini-30 and the one I switched the sling over for my son in law to shoot. Now he has his own Mini-30, 4 of them in our family.



 

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We've covered this several times but it always bears repeating. When suspending the gun by the sling the gun must lay flat. This produces the least "Negative Torque" on your body while carrying and the gun will stay flat against you with the least amount of effort on your part to keep it there. The more you have to babysit it the faster fatigue negatively influences your shooting.

Side note: That side mounted swivel on the gas block was also used on the ACC 5.56 select fire guns.

Note: The position of the rear sling attachment close to the top of the buttstock. This necessary to achieve proper balance. This Sling was installed in 2007! The Velcro Attachments came from a Blue Force Tactical Sling I had. But the sling itself is one of my 1.5" wide Home Made Slings. I have been mounting slings like this for a while.
Air gun Shotgun Gun barrel Trigger Machine gun


Note: How the gun lays flat against my belly with no hands on it. You still need to always have a hand on the gun in case of sling failure.

Flower Plant Leg Shorts Musician


Laying flat across the back, and if you have to run with the gun this is the preferred carry method.
Note: the magazine not poking me in he back?

Joint Musical instrument Plant Flowerpot Musician


Conventional Carry Mag not poking me in the back and same with Muzzle Down or African Carry. The Sling Bridles are secured to the existing Swivel Studs with tie wraps.

Joint Watch Sleeve Shorts Waist



Joint Shoulder Plant Flower Shorts


On my Tactical Shotguns with Magpul Stocks I have a QD Limited Rotation Swivel Socket on both sides. When carrying Cross Body I have the rear of the sling mounted on the right side of the stock. This keeps the gun pulled into me as opposed to falling away. For all other carry methods the sling is put back on the left side. Since these are QD Sling Swivels it only takes a few seconds to change it .
Hope this helps with understanding of this subject.

Randy
 
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