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It's a .223 Wylde chamber. Splits the difference between the chamber dimensions for .223 Remington commercial, and 5.56 NATO. Allows the use of either.

When most rifles of the Garand/M1A pattern are rebarrelled, the barrels are short chambered and require the use of a finish reamer to cut the chamber by hand to the appropriate specs.
 

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Are you actually holding a conversation here?

Last I checked, closing on a NO-GO doesn't automatically make a rifle unsafe.
If the rifle is re-barreled under warranty, it's Ruger doing the work, therefore it's Ruger choosing the headspace dimensions.

Are you sure you're using the headspace guages correctly?
 

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Except that a standard 223 headspace no-go gauge will allow the bolt to close on my Target model. The Target model is NOT listed by Ruger as safe for the 5.56.
By close, do you mean the bolt rotates all the way clock-wise as it does on an empty chamber? The locking lugs have a helix angle, so closing short of full bolt rotation may still be in spec.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Are you actually holding a conversation here?

Last I checked, closing on a NO-GO doesn't automatically make a rifle unsafe.
If the rifle is re-barreled under warranty, it's Ruger doing the work, therefore it's Ruger choosing the headspace dimensions.

Are you sure you're using the headspace guages correctly?
I don't understand the conversation comment! If it's meant to be sarcastic, there is no need for that.

The rifle has not been rebarreled, yet, but am considering it, an no not by Ruger. I have rebarreled my Savage rifles and converted them safely from 223 to and including 338 Win Mag, so I understand the proper use of headspace gauges. An If you'll check around, you might just be surprised to find there is a reason it's called the no-go gauge. It means there is excessive headspace and could very easily cause pierced primers, and a host of other blowback issues, so in my book it's not safe.

That is the reason I was asking about the Ruger gauge vs the industry standard in 223. Again this is NOT for the ranch rifle, it's the Target model. Ruger says it's not safe for 5.56 ammo, so I was real curious when the bolt closed on my no-go gauge.

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Yea closed all the way and even went click when the trigger was pulled. I tried this with a partially closed bolt and it did not fire.

I would really like to see the difference in the specs for the standard 223 vs the Ruger version.

Also someone mentioned the Wylde chamber, and I may be wrong, but I read that the Wylde chamber, actually has a shorter neck, than standard 223. IF that is the case, then the headspace gauge should work either way, I would think. There is no neck on the gauges.
 

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I have checked around, and there's this thing called a FIELD guage. THAT guage determines if a rifle is unsafe. A NO-GO guage chambering says it MAY be unsafe.

According to Subscriber's M4Carbine.net article there are dimensional differences to the NO-GO guages in 5.56 NATO vs .223 Rem.

You need to clarify, Handirifle, what headspace guages you are using. I'm guessing .223.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I am using and referring to std factory 223 headspace gauges. I see the specs on 223 vs 5.56, but if you notice, at least that's what I see, is the difference is from the end of the case mouth forward. Headspace gauges do NOT concern themselves with case necks. At least none of mine do. They come to a very abrupt cone, just past the shoulder. In fact, the headspace gauges for my 338 WM, are only about 2" long, since they headspace off the belt.

That's why a lot of WM shooters get much better accuracy by only neck sizing.

No, it's got to be some other reason Ruger uses different one, but I cannot understand why? AR's use std gauges, right? It can't be cause they are semi auto.
 

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Mini-14 Headspace

I am new to the forum. I am in work on rebarreling my 188 series mini ranch rifle. I am also puzzled by the claim that Ruger uses a different dimension head space gauge.
I am planning on a .223 Wylde chamber and have the reamer and go/no go gauges. Although I have already removed my barrel, I screwed the barrel into the receiver hand tight (about 1/4" rotation wise from where it was when factory tight). The bolt will close fully on the go gauge but will not fully close on the no-go gauge. Hope that sheds a little more light on the headspace question.
For the record I am attempting to make a .750" barrel Mini. I have a Douglas XX blank, but picked up a deal I could not pass up on a Green Mountain barrel blank and will use the Green Mountain on the Mini. I am going to save the Douglas blank for a Remington 700 build.
I am making a gas block from scratch and am half finished. I just had some thoughts on locating the gas tube bore in the block and fitting the op-rod if anyone wants to discuss it. Not sure this is the correct thread for that but I will look around.
 

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That is the reason I was asking about the Ruger gauge vs the industry standard in 223. Again this is NOT for the ranch rifle, it's the Target model. Ruger says it's not safe for 5.56 ammo, so I was real curious when the bolt closed on my no-go gauge.
I'm no expert, but to the best of my knowledge it goes like this: SAAMI .223 vs 5.56 NATO spec involves the distance between the case mouth and the beginning of the rifling. Reason its potentially unsafe is that there is a chance you'll get a slightly long (but in spec) 5.56 ctg and the bullet and case mouth can be jammed into the rifling resulting in excessive pressure. Shorter throat should give better accuracy since the bullet is clearing a shorter distance, but its at the cost of requiring tightly spec'd ammo that won't run the risk of jamming the case mouth into the rifling.

If you really have any questions about the safety of your rifle and/or ammunition, by all means contact Ruger and hear what they have to say. I have no opinion at all on the safety of a piece I have not even had on my workbench, but I would let Ruger be the judge in any case. Just my two cents.

Best,
Grumpy
 
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