Perfect Union banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While cleaning and lubing I noted some peening on the bolt where it strikes the hammer. You can (hopefully) see where some material has rolled over a bit. Should I just stone it back a bit and perhaps polish the area, or is this cause to send it into Ruger.

It's a 582 series I bought in 2013. It had about 100 rounds through it. About a 1/3 has been Federal 5.56. The rest has been mostly Freedom Munitions .223 and some PMC Bronze.

I forgot to take pics of the hammer but it's still smooth and shiny.

mini 14 bolt peen2.jpg
mini 14 bolt peen.jpg
 

·
Formerly "raf"
Joined
·
1,991 Posts
I suggest leaving it alone, and monitoring the situation. Save your pix as a reference, and continue firing it. If it gets noticeably worse, then consider contacting Ruger. Possibly the bolt was improperly heat treated, but that remains to be seen. Messing with the bolt might void any warranty on the bolt.
 

·
Major General Chit Chat
Joined
·
1,601 Posts
That's a common wear point for the Mini-14/30 and M14/M1A. I've not seen wear quite that extreme, but I haven't seen that many up close or in photos. I have two bolts for my Mini-30. That edge on both is just slightly rounded. My original bolt is very smooth, while my spare bolt has a light "peen" you can feel by running a fingernail over it. IMO it wouldn't hurt to buff that rolled over forward edge until it's smooth.

I'm a proponent of keeping the Mini lubed... grease where appropriate and light oil where appropriate. The bolt needs grease. If you're not in the habit of using grease on the bolt, now would be a good time to start. What kind of grease is hotly debated and some people insist on running them dry. Trust me... you need some type of grease at these wear points.

It wouldn't hurt to contact Ruger Support via email and send them these pics. That's the best way of getting a definitive answer and advice on how to proceed.
 

·
Formerly "raf"
Joined
·
1,991 Posts
That's a common wear point for the Mini-14/30 and M14/M1A. I've not seen wear quite that extreme, but I haven't seen that many up close or in photos. I have two bolts for my Mini-30. That edge on both is just slightly rounded. My original bolt is very smooth, while my spare bolt has a light "peen" you can feel by running a fingernail over it. IMO it wouldn't hurt to buff that rolled over forward edge until it's smooth. I'm a proponent of keeping the Mini lubed... grease where appropriate and light oil where appropriate. The bolt needs grease. If you're not in the habit of using grease on the bolt, now would be a good time to start. What kind of grease is hotly debated and some people insist on running them dry. Trust me... you need some type of grease at these wear points. It wouldn't hurt to contact Ruger Support via email and send them these pics. That's the best way of getting a definitive answer and advice on how to proceed.
Beck's advice about lubing your Mini is well-taken. Lube instructions and type(s) of lube used same for Mini as for M1 and M1A rifles. Don't forget to lube the latching "Hooks" on the trigger guard, and the points where they latch to the receiver.

Some folks run the Mini dry, but in my opinion, that is an extreme measure, best done only in extremely cold and/or extremely dusty conditions. Opinions vary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I I keep mine well lubed but avoid this specific spot due to the close proximity of the firing pin. If you lube here and are suggesting I lube this point as well, I'll give it a try.
 

·
Formerly "raf"
Joined
·
1,991 Posts
Watch this vid: Ruger Mini-14 Maintenance Series: Lubrication | Top Rated Supplier of Firearm Reloading Equipment, Supplies, and Tools - Colt IIRC, he neglects to mention greasing the Trigger guard "hooks" and their latching points on the receiver. Please don't make that omission.

Lubing (greasing) the point(s) where the bolt contacts the hammer is normal. Generally speaking, a light film of grease/oil (in their appropriate areas) is all that's required. A little goes a long way. Just wipe off old/excess lube, and renew occasionally. The benefit of using white Lubriplate is that as it gets blacker, one can see it, and renew before the lube is completely contaminated/used up. Dark synthetic CV joint grease might be a slightly superior lube, but it's hard to see when it's applied, and also hard to tell when it's contaminated.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
52 Posts
My main concern would be that this bolt had only been exposed to 100 rounds!!!...That would absolutely be reason enough to contact Ruger and at least get it on record as to having an issue....100 rounds isn't anything for a rifle...Even when it comes to designed wear parts, I can't think of anything that needs changed out THAT quickly....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've seen the entire Brownell's Mini 14 series.

Haven't shot this since well before C-19. Don't recall it's condition the last time I had it apart. I too think that's a lot for so little rounds. Guess I should go shoot it more often and see if it worsens. It still function checks fine with dummy rounds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Saudade,
I don't understand why you're so reluctant to send Ruger's Customer Service an e-mail describing your concern, and including pictures. It cost's nothing, and Ruger CS might be able to put an end to your worrying. At the very least you will have a record of notifying them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
For some reason Ruger seems to leave the back of their Mini-14 bolts a little soft. My Mini-14s have some peening there. I just dressed down the burrs sticking up. I think that the peening will work harden the steel, and then the rate of peening will slow to a stop. If not, then Ruger can help.

Rather than be keen to ship off a rifle to the manufacturer, I factor in the possibility of it being "lost" by the shipper, and the hassle of getting a replacement.

Ruger will want the whole rifle back, so they can check the headspace. They will not ship you just a bolt.

Shoot another 100 rounds and see if the peening doubles. If so, call Ruger. If it were mine, I would file off the raised metal first...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm not reluctant. I've read many, many posts on this and other forums where folks ask "Is this abnormal" and find out it's OK. So I'm just checking.

I'll likely dress the edges off but not polish and see how it goes. Meanwhile I'll get started on list of other things I may have Ruger do if I send it in.
 

·
Formerly "raf"
Joined
·
1,991 Posts
I sent my Mini back to Ruger long ago (when there were few alternatives) for spare firing pins, extractors, ejectors, and all the related bits and pieces for the latter two items, all fitted to my Mini. I made an in-passing remark that my Mini was not as accurate as I would have liked, and Ruger replaced and carefully head-spaced the bolt (on their dime) which resulted in much-improved accuracy.

There are now alternatives to Ruger for spares, but you will need to send the rifle to the company for them to do the fitting of the parts-- if they offer such fitting services, that is. So, if sending the Mini to Ruger, consider buying such fitted spares.

The parts list in your owner's manual should indicate the parts which require fitting. Minis are not known for requiring much in the way of spare parts, but some selected spares is never a bad idea. Might add a Mainspring (recoil/action spring) as a useful spare to above list.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
...I'm a proponent of keeping the Mini lubed... grease where appropriate and light oil where appropriate. The bolt needs grease. If you're not in the habit of using grease on the bolt, now would be a good time to start. What kind of grease is hotly debated and some people insist on running them dry. Trust me... you need some type of grease at these wear points...
The Ruger instruction manual for the Mini only indicates the use of oil to lubricate the rifle. No mention of grease. I only use oil to lube my Mini 14, and it works great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I received some spare parts from Numrich a few months ago, none that required fitting.

My goal was to have spares to keep selected firearms "operational" despite any real or imaginary legislation that prevents me from servicing them ( I'm in CA). My Mini is one of them (some may call me crazy). Short of some catastrophic failure, I can keep them going, a mix of Eveready and Timex.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The Ruger instruction manual for the Mini only indicates the use of oil to lubricate the rifle. No mention of grease. I only use oil to lube my Mini 14, and it works great.
Brownell's has a series on the Mini. They advocate greasing the contact areas such as the bolt rails, the op rod, etc.


I do subscribe to the notion of "if it rotates, oil it, if it slides, grease it".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
"if it rotates, oil it, if it slides, grease it". Sorry, but that statement is questionable:

The mini bolt rotates when it locks, yet it should be greased. That is because the viscosity of appropriate lube has more to do with the clearance between parts than the motion. Even a hammer pin "rotation" is just sliding at the interface between hammer and pin.

Unless it a rotating part has ball or roller bearings, a lot of sliding is involved. Even then, ball and roller bearings slide a little. They are lubed with grease in closed systems, such as wheel bearings. But, lubed with oil inside a gearbox. So, the type of lube has no bearing on sliding or rotation :)

Oil will be drawn in and held in place by a small gap. This, while grease cannot wick into a tight gap. Grease will be squished out of a tight space such as hammer and trigger pins, if you lube before reassembly. So, oil makes sense for pins because of the space, not the movement.

Oil tends to get thrown off loose fitting parts, such as the Mini bolt. Not a huge problem if you are shooting a limited number of rounds between lube applications. Oil certainly cleans up easier after shooting than grease.

So, grease for loose fitting parts, and oil for tight ones. The next and possibly overriding consideration is operating temperature. If it is cold, grease may cause short stroking of the bolt. Or sluggish firing pin movement, leading to misfiring.

For the rear of the bolt, a dab of grease seems most appropriate.

As for the dread of allowing lube near the firing pin; if the firing pin and channel are dry and you end up in a rain storm, there is a risk of the firing pin rusting fast in its channel. The dreaded slamfire we are warned about is not possible, if the firing pin tail and receiver interface are in spec. That prevents the firing pin from protruding from the bolt face, until the bolt is fully locked into battery. If your Mini's firing pin can protrude from the bolt face, with the bolt at anything less than 95% locking lug overlap, have Ruger fix it. Immediately.

But, but, but; what about a broken firing pin where the front end protrudes from the bolt face? What has that to do with lube on the firing pin?

I would be more concerned about lube in the firing pin channel becoming charged with firing residue, including brass flakes, to the point of causing a weak primer strike, than the lube jamming the firing pin to cause a slam fire. So, oil on the firing pin seems appropriate to me. Replenished often.

It is a matter of choosing a lube regimen deliberately, and adjusting that according to conditions, if there is a hint of malfunctions happening. There is a temptation to do what works for others, but blind following is where "if it rotates, oil it, if it slides, grease it" comes from. No thinking involved there, in a context where asking questions is frowned upon, and blind obedience is expected.
 

·
Major General Chit Chat
Joined
·
1,601 Posts
The Ruger instruction manual for the Mini only indicates the use of oil to lubricate the rifle. No mention of grease. I only use oil to lube my Mini 14, and it works great.
For now it may work fine. Follow M14/M1A guidelines for lubrication. As much as I love Ruger products, there is some bad advise coming from Ruger concerning their own products. And they're not the only company that officially don't seem to understand many things about their products. The Mini manuals have been full of errors since I first picked up a Mini-14 manual in 1988. I ignore much of what is in my Mini-30 manual.

IMHO a potential or current Mini owner should become well acquainted with the M14/M1A, it's function and maintenance before he touches a Mini-14/Mini-30.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gary8907

·
Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
Oiling a Mini is better than dry...

If we accept that it must be greased, then we will argue about the right grease :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Saudade

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
Brownell's has a series on the Mini. They advocate greasing the contact areas such as the bolt rails, the op rod, etc.


I do subscribe to the notion of "if it rotates, oil it, if it slides, grease it".
I see no reason to use grease on my Mini 14. Ruger doesn't advocate it in the instruction manual. I don't use grease on any of my handguns, semi-auto or revolver, either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
OK, OK. I didn't intend to turn this into another round of the never ending debate over lube.

Thanks to all for their input and insight!
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top