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Welcome umwminer, I'm sorry I'm not much on loaning out my stuff, but you can order the video from Mike Knifoing at NW Shooter Support for $15 including shipping. It isn't a hollywood production, and needs editing, but in the 2 hrs. Mike does a good job showing you step by step as he beds a mini. He also shows how to change out the gas bushing. If you have never bedded a rifle before I would recommed seeing it. After seeing it I felt very confident to do it. It turned out great. I recommend using the Acraglas Gel Kit (green box) it is thicker, and dosen't run all over. It comes with about everything you need except modeling clay. I used Mylar tape to block forming a mechanical lock. You will see in the video. Good luck!;) E-mail Mike at; [email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks for the reply and info. I've glass bedded several bolt guns but have never attempted any of the M1 family of weapons. I've an AC556 that needs help. Thanks again!......Bob
 

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hey umwminer, then if you already have bedded rifles before, the major diff, is bedding the stock liner to the stock, then the action, and leaving the gas block loose while bedding. The rest should be similar, in preping, free floating the barrel up to the gas block first before beding etc. You should be good to go. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
cajungeo, It is the bedding of the gas block area that I dont understand,ie: If I bed the action with the gas block loose and free float the bbl, after the glass sets up and I put the block back togeather and re set the bbled action in the stock, I would assume that I will be stressing the bbl to conform with the stock. Thats a whole lot different than any bolt gun I've ever glassed. Thats why I wanted to watch the video....Bob
 

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About leaving the gas block loose while the bedding job cures, I don't think it's a good idea. It didn't work for me. But I've only done one, twice.

On the first attempt, I left the gas block completely off. Three nights later, I separated the stock. My first concern was the stock might be glued to the trigger block assembly or the receiver. A few taps on a wood chisel to wedge the parts apart, and it broke loose with a tight fit. # 1 concern over!

The next weekend, I put the gas block on and was really surprised that it didn't fit square to the left and right. So the stock had less clearance on the left side than it did on the right. Which meant that the op-rod didn't center with the gas block. And the pressure wasn't even on both sides.

So I ground out some of the bedding and did it over. Now I have a different pressure problem. Although it does seem to be centered left and right, there seems to be too much pressure vertically. I'm contemplating grinding away some of the stock to reduce the pressure at the gas block. How well will all this affect accuracy? Don't know, but my logic says that the stock pressure should be even and not too much.

Another thing that really bothers me, is the op-rod doesn't seat consistently. It bangs against the gas piston and I can usually hear at least 3 clunks when it seats. I really want to somehow add a guide of some sort for the op-rod. So it doesn't clunk with the gas piston. Any ideas on how to do this would really be appreciated!

Thanks,
KC
 

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Sorry umwminer, I didn't make it very clear. You DON'T bed the gas block, you only loosen it for easier install of the barrel/receiver during beding. In Mikes video he shows you can use large rubber bands to hold the receiver down, with the trigger group in, not latched. The trigger group will help locate the receiver in your stock. I left out the rubber bands, and latched in my trigger group. You bed the Stock Support Liner to the stock, then the stock support liner to the action, especially around the recoil lugs. You are beding the receiver area only, also under the receiver where it contacts the top of the stock. Exception if you have a rubber Hogue Stock. I had to leave this area alone as it has a rubber coating. The resin will not bond well to it. It works for me :)
Kalif. The Metal Liner in the bottom of the fore stock is what guides the opp rod into the gas piston. Is your bent, or missing? or your fore stock warped?
Also BEFORE you bed, you may have to free up any binding in the forstock area by grinding off material. I have seen some cheep plastic stocks warped in the fore stock area. On some you can twist the forestock, and see it move, and twist. The fiberglass stocks are more ridgid, as well as the wood ones. It is important to rehearse installing the barrel/action into the stock, before applying resin, and remove any material that binds. Kalif I hate to say it, but you may have to remove more beding, or remove it all and try again. A drimmel will make short work of this. When you beded did you have your trigger group in, and your gas block loose only, not off? This will make a big diff in centering the receiver/barel with the stock!
 

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Thanks Cajungeo for the details. I didn't quite understand the rubber band method and why the trigger group should be unlatched.

Anyhow, on my first attempt, I completely left the gas block off since I didn't see the need. Now I know, it serves as a guidepost for proper seating of the stock liner and the rest of the bedding.

There wasn't a metal liner for the op-rod. The stock is black synthetic and the bedding seems to stick OK. Of course, I roughed up the bedding areas with very course grinding from my dremel tool.

KC
 

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OUCH!.:eek: Kalif ya gotsta have a Forearm Liner & Stock Cap Assembly. It is the only thing that guides the Slide-Rod home with out hitting your gas piston. I also have a black synthetic stock (Hogue) synthetic stock, I had to use the Liner from the original stock. Numrich Gun Parts, can fix you up for $6.45, or you can see how much Ruger charges.
Also let me clear up any confusion about liners. (1) There is a "Stock Reinforcement". I have called them metal liners in the past, but will use the correct term from now on. This piece is screwed into the ruger wood stock, around the receiver area. Your recoil lugs fit into it. This must be bedded to the stock, and to the receiver, when beding a wood stock (both sides). On My Hogue stock, it is not used. (2) The "Forearm Liner & Stock Cap Assembly" fits in the bottom of the forestock, one end fits over the stock forend, and into the gas block. The other end latches under the chamber. The "Slide Assembly" (Op-rod) slides along this Forearm Liner, and is guided to seat around the gas piston. This Liner does not get beded!
I'm sorry for the confusion:confused:
 

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cajungeo,
Last saturday night I stayed up till 1AM making a op-rod guide for my mini-14. I attached it into the forearm of the stock and repeatedly took it out and sanded on it for a custom fit. Got it belt-sanded down to where the op-rod slides without binding.

When it slams into the gas block, there's a slight alignment problem, but it doesn't bind. I think shimming under the lower block will cure that.

Range results on Sunday were good.

KC
 

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Wow, kali, that was an ambitious project. I'm glad its working out for you. I bet your mini sounds better when manually cycling it. Maby you could post pictures, when bill gets the attach file back up to speed.
I've got to figure out why my rapid signature is stuck, on text.
 
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