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Formerly "raf"
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That might be an issue and I will look at it. Never thought of the follower bottoming out but if anything bottoms out that would be the thing that bottoms out first. Only other thing would be the spring getting coil bound.

Thanks for the tip!

Randy.
You're welcome!

In general, about 1/2 ctg diameter "extra" capacity is desirable if mag is fully loaded to nominal capacity. It's when things get "tight" that "downloading" of mags becomes required. Note that the first and foremost thing to ensure is that one has a properly functioning mag spring, of correct length for your particular mag. Second is proper, good condition main springs in the rifle itself. Make sure of these things first.

If a particular mag lacks about 1/2 ctg diameter of "extra" capacity, disassemble the mag and remove the spring, leaving the follower inside. Load the mag (usually upside down) to full capacity and see how much "extra' capacity is available. If less than about 1/2 ctg diameter, then trim follower appropriate amount, and re-test.

Try this test again, with the spring installed. Again, see how much "extra" capacity is available. If about 1/2 ctg diameter "extra" capacity is available, you have fixed the issue. If not, then perhaps the spring needs trimming. At least you have fixed one issue, and know where to proceed. Trim the bottom of the spring 1/2 coil at a time until desired "extra" capacity is obtained. However, if the spring needs to be trimmed due to over-length, and the spring is not known to be fairly new, then use a new spring.

This procedure has worked well for me, and has allowed quite a few crappy (and even fairly decent) aftermarket mags to be rehabilitated, and useful. Every magazine is unique, and what works on one mag might not work on an ostensibly identical mag.
 

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I did a 2 day Practical Rifle Class at Front Sight last weekend, and took the Mini 14, and my Ruger PCC.40

Ammo was tight and I didn't have enough to run the PCC for the whole class so I brought the Mini 14 along for a second gun.

The gun ran fine but did something I'd never seen. It stuck a round in the chamber and we had to Butt Stroke It to get it running again. Never seen that before. Didn't happen again. I attributed it to a dirty chamber or just the dirt flying around everywhere as the wind was blowing 50 mph the whole second day of the class.

It took me 2 hours and a can of Brake Cleaner to clean all the dirt and dust out of that gun.

I had one other problem that I am going to make you aware of.

Prior to this trip my Tapco 2nd Gen Mags had worked perfectly. However cooking for 4 days in the car in 93* weather allowed the feed lips to expand when loaded and that made it so the Magazine would NOT go in the Magwell. It was too wide at the top! So I couldn't load the gun.

Back to Ruger Mags for the duration.

Mind you,,, those same Tapco Mags are just fine now that they have been allowed to cool back down, and resume their original shape.

Just a heads up on the Tapco Mags. Don't let them get hot.

Randy
What did you think of their class and instruction? Blowing dirt and sand is a harsh environment indeed. I lived in the engineering plastics world for quite a while, Acetal plastic is easily deformed and then the reinforcements arrive fiberglass, polycarbonate and a couple more. Which can make it extremely durable for wear and thermal reactions. It's all about cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
All the Front Sight classes are excellent. I have been to 30 of them over the last 16 years. Some feel the instruction might be too basic. But in the Practical Level Classes they are teaching people who don't know which end of the bullet the gun comes out of as well as more advanced shooters. They are teaching teh Fundamentals of any given Weapons platform.

I go twice every year to refresh my Fundamentals. Anything you do will have Fundamental Components, and those components are what you assemble to execute whatever discipline you are practicing. It is the key factor in all disciplines.

As far as the dirt flying around, it was the worst I've ever seen, but not typical of the venue. I mean there is always going to be dirt because it is in the middle of the desert, but this time the wind was wild and it especially hard t deal with.

As far as plastics I have a Kel-Tec SU16 CA which is a plastic gun I have gotten excellent service from it. I also have a Bushmaster Carbon 15 which is plastic AR. It weighs 5 lb 3 oz.

Randy
 

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All the Front Sight classes are excellent. I have been to 30 of them over the last 16 years. Some feel the instruction might be too basic. But in the Practical Level Classes they are teaching people who don't know which end of the bullet the gun comes out of as well as more advanced shooters. They are teaching teh Fundamentals of any given Weapons platform.

I go twice every year to refresh my Fundamentals. Anything you do will have Fundamental Components, and those components are what you assemble to execute whatever discipline you are practicing. It is the key factor in all disciplines.

As far as the dirt flying around, it was the worst I've ever seen, but not typical of the venue. I mean there is always going to be dirt because it is in the middle of the desert, but this time the wind was wild and it especially hard t deal with.

As far as plastics I have a Kel-Tec SU16 CA which is a plastic gun I have gotten excellent service from it. I also have a Bushmaster Carbon 15 which is plastic AR. It weighs 5 lb 3 oz.

Randy
In view of the blowing dust, did you remove all lube/grease from the Mini (assuming you use such) and run it "dry"? Did doing so make a difference?

In the same vein, would a plastic, slip-on muzzle/flash suppressor cap have been useful?

I have always wondered if cloth action covers might not be useful for Minis/M1s and M1As. Used to be a "thing" way back around WW I, and some folks (Germans and Japanese) made sliding metal action covers for some of their bolt-action rifles. Mostly they were noisy, and AFAIK detested/removed by the troops in the field.

1903/1917 Action cover: Model 1903 Springfield rifle action cover?

But a carefully-designed action cover, which was designed to be either removed by hand OR "shot-loose" always struck me as something worth investigating. That big hole in the side of the actions/receivers of such rifles seems like a large ingress point for dust/ice/mud and so forth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
Bob: no I didn't run it dry, in fact I juiced it up more than usual. Mini's have certain requirements s far as lubrication. The rear of the bolt that slides on the rear of the receiver is the one place you can't really get at from outside the gun. The gun was relatively clean adn only got dusted during the course of fire during the day. It's not like I dumped it in sand

When I cleaned the gun I took the action out of the stock, I hosed the fire control group out with Brake Cleaner which is pretty easy to get full compliance with. Then I hosed the rest of the action from the underside with Brake Cleaner as well. All the dust was removed with that process. I don't remove my bolt as I'd have to remove the optic and I don't want to have to re-zero the gun. I can get at everything that matters with the Brake Clean. It comes out like a fire hose!

I re-lubed the rear of the bolt with Vaseline, and the slide ways with Vaseline and My Magic Synthetic Oil. My Magic Oil is Amsoil 20-50 Racing Oil which I use on everything in my shop. It is the best Liquid Lubricant in existence, and the best gun lube I've found and I use it on all my firearms. When grease is needed I use Vaseline which one of the best Low Speed Lubes ever devised. I use it exclusively on my high $ shotguns on the hinges that must be kept wet so they don't gall as the gun heats up. I keep a Travel Tube of it in all my Shotgun Cases as well as a small bottle of Magic Oil. Since these guns are disassembled and put back into their cases each time, they get the hinge lubed with Vaseline and then a drop of oil on the ejectors.

The really dirty part of the Mini 14 is always the Op Rod, Gas Piston and Internal Fore End area. I hadn't cleaned that area for years and it was very dirty from powder residue. That was all wiped clean with a paper shop towel. The Guide Rod and Return Spring got a dose of oil as well.

This gun is good to go for another several years.

Pump Action Shotguns get a drop of oil on the op rods and slide ways of the bolt, the A5 gets a drop on the Barrel/Bolt Slide ways and on the Friction Ring and Spring around the magazine.

My guns always run well and if they don't, they get fixed so that they will run right the next time. All of these things are machinery and the biggest enemy of Machinery is dirt and lack of lubrication. A5's are Really more machinery than firearm. JMB recommended 30wt Motor oil as lube for the A5. I simply upgraded that to 20-50w Synthetic Motor Oil.
YMMV

Randy
64470
 
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Formerly "raf"
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Bob: no I didn't run it dry, in fact I juiced it up more than usual. Mini's have certain requirements s far as lubrication. The rear of the bolt that slides on the rear of the receiver is the one place you can't really get at from outside the gun. The gun was relatively clean adn only got dusted during the course of fire during the day. It's not like I dumped it in sand

When I cleaned the gun I took the action out of the stock, I hosed the fire control group out with Brake Cleaner which is pretty easy to get full compliance with. Then I hosed the rest of the action from the underside with Brake Cleaner as well. All the dust was removed with that process. I don't remove my bolt as I'd have to remove the optic and I don't want to have to re-zero the gun. I can get at everything that matters with the Brake Clean. It comes out like a fire hose!

I re-lubed the rear of the bolt with Vaseline, and the slide ways with Vaseline and My Magic Synthetic Oil. My Magic Oil is Amsoil 20-50 Racing Oil which I use on everything in my shop. It is the best Liquid Lubricant in existence, and the best gun lube I've found and I use it on all my firearms. When grease is needed I use Vaseline which one of the best Low Speed Lubes ever devised. I use it exclusively on my high $ shotguns on the hinges that must be kept wet so they don't gall as the gun heats up. I keep a Travel Tube of it in all my Shotgun Cases as well as a small bottle of Magic Oil. Since these guns are disassembled and put back into their cases each time, they get the hinge lubed with Vaseline and then a drop of oil on the ejectors.

The really dirty part of the Mini 14 is always the Op Rod, Gas Piston and Internal Fore End area. I hadn't cleaned that area for years and it was very dirty from powder residue. That was all wiped clean with a paper shop towel. The Guide Rod and Return Spring got a dose of oil as well.

This gun is good to go for another several years.

Pump Action Shotguns get a drop of oil on the op rods and slide ways of the bolt, the A5 gets a drop on the Barrel/Bolt Slide ways and on the Friction Ring and Spring around the magazine.

My guns always run well and if they don't, they get fixed so that they will run right the next time. All of these things are machinery and the biggest enemy of Machinery is dirt and lack of lubrication. A5's are Really more machinery than firearm. JMB recommended 30wt Motor oil as lube for the A5. I simply upgraded that to 20-50w Synthetic Motor Oil.
YMMV

Randy
View attachment 64470
Well, food for thought. Not sure I'd have followed all your suggestions, but I was not there, and you were. All the best!
 

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Randy, you use 20-50, I use 80-90 gear oil. I cut the gear oil with RemOil depending on what time of year.
kwg
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
KWG: the thing about the Magic Oil I use is that it is "synthetic" and it doesn't burn or solidify and maintains it's fluidity no matter the temps. Any petroleum based oil will stiffen up when it gets cold.

I use this stuff on all my machines in my Shop and have for 30+ years. It also sticks to the surfaces really well and stays on the job. If it appears wet you have good lubrication. My A5 shotguns are a very good example of how well it works. I put one drop on the slideways for the barrel and bolt, and one on the friction ring before each day of shooting at the Schools and it is good to go all day thruout 200+ shots.

I can't recommend this stuff enough it is that good. 1 Qt will last a life time !
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