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Hi
I have been looking at my metal mags & hear that some people say that mags would last a life time.
I feel that mags with a large amount of pressure on the top lips, will not last as long as some people think.

Not just the lips that have the weakness but feel that the metal on the sides of the mags, that only the sides that you can see when the mags are clicked into the rifle, should be thicker than they are. I have seen many mags that have little dings in them that stops the feeding of the bullets, even one of my new john mason mag that came from america had when I opened the plastic bag, a little ding, this has not stopped the function of the mag, but just makes me a little angry.

Is their any information on the internet, to say how long we should expect the mags to last?.

Please put the website address here

thanks
:ar15:
 

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Mags tend to last according to how their owners treat them, as well as their quality of manufacture. If you are storing your magazines, it is best to store them UNloaded as this reduces stress on the spring and the feed lips.

Other than that, care during use will prevent dents. If they are cheap, thin metal, then they are just that... cheap. Toss 'em. Life is too precious to risk on cheap mags.
 

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Its very humid here in louisiana, so I pull out the mags once in a while, and apply a light coat of oil and wipe them off. This keeps them from rusting.
 

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To my Louisana brother eating my Crawfish: I sprayed my mags with brownells teflon/moly coat and baked them at 300 deg. I coated the springs with a molywheel bearing grease. My springs don't rust nor do my mags here in the Texas humidity. The Teflon/Moly coat will wear off eventually, but if done to spec. I works well. PS: My wife doesn't like the smell of the teflon/moly when baked in her oven but she agrees that I can do it when she's not here. Can't have everything. I buy the teflon/moly in bulk and spray it on with an air brush. Be sure to degrease completely, I use acetone or brake cleaner. Use Some sort of gloves so you don't get the cleaner or coating on yourself. Follow directions and if necessary contact the tech dept. at brownells for assistance.
 

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King, thanks for the tip. I'll check it out. I wonder how it would work in the barrel? I don't know much about moly bullets, but I think the basics is they coat your bore, which may increase velocity a little, but mostly keeps your barrel from fouling, thus maintaining accuracy during long strings of firing? Have you ever heard of anyone using the moly/teflon in their barrel?
p.s. I didn't eat all the crawfish, there still plenty left!
 

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I wouldn't use it in a barrel. I have sprayed the outside of my barrel and reciever and baked them. The trigger group has also been done. To my Cajun brother, there use to be a company called Armalloy that would hard chrome the barrel of a rifle. They don't seem to be in business any more. I use the teflon/moly coat for rust prevention. Using it on the trigger group has been limited to parts other than pins. Allways remove springs. Don't bake them. I still clean my barrel with shooters choice, after the coppper has been removed I coat it with Birchwood Casey spray gun sheath rust preventive. Works well for me and I haven't had a properly clean barrel treated with the rust prev. coorrode. Good luck and good shooting.
 
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