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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a general question for Garand connoisseurs....

Given a choice of Springfield M1 Garands with a possible mix of parts but the receiver being Springfield and the condition to be a typical CMP service grade rifle would you prefer:

A. Springfield receiver with a very low serial number that is just pre-WWII like serial number 200,XXX, or...

B. Springfield receiver with a WWII serial number like 2,800,xxx.

Curios to know how receiver number impact desirability given the other factors are the same...or maybe no one cares....opinions?
 

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Mine was made in june/july 1942. I bought the CMP special, with the new barrel from criterion. It's a shooter. That's the only reason it got it, to be a shooter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was asking from the point of view of if a low number was more desirable than a high number but also if it was manufactured before USA entry into WWII versus manufactured in war time. Maybe it makes not difference one way or another but I thought I'd ask for opinions.
 

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Serial number vintage does not add any value in my opinion. For a pre-war or war time production rifle to be worth a premium, it would have to have the correct barrel, stock, or other valuable parts.
 

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Simply put, condition is just about everything when it comes to Garands, as there are almost none in original condition. Most if not all have been rebuilt at least once, and more than likely several times.
The only ones in any semblance of original condition are in museums, and wealthy private collections.
Personally, I would prefer a high serial number Garand, over a low number, simply because it will hopefully have less "miles". Although a Garand with a documented history is a pleasure and honor to hold, I prefer shooters in best possible shooting condition.
Remember to shoot M2 ball, or equivalent through it, and not off the shelf hunting loads, to ensure a nice, long life of the rifle.
 
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Simply put, condition is just about everything when it comes to Garands, as there are almost none in original condition. Most if not all have been rebuilt at least once, and more than likely several times...
Depending on how many places past the decimal point you define "original condition"...?


The Greek returns provided the CMP w/ a fair amount of collector grade Bbl'ed actions in pristine condition, stocked in CMP birch, and sold as Service Grades.

Though they are in the 5.5 - 5.8M S/N range.




GR
 

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When I say "original condition", I'm referring to original parts and configuration as it was turned out by the manufacturer. There are almost none in that condition, except in museums, and collections. The greek returns are nice, indeed. The phillipine ones, not as much.
 

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When I say "original condition", I'm referring to original parts and configuration as it was turned out by the manufacturer. There are almost none in that condition, except in museums, and collections. The greek returns are nice, indeed. The phillipine ones, not as much.
True.

From Unit cleaning parties while in garrison - where each part or group from all the unit's M1 rifles were delegated to a different troop to clean, and then "grab-bag" re-assembled...

... to Field Maintenance/re-build at the Ordnance Depots during conflicts...

... to Arsenal overhauls between conflicts.

But... bein' M1 rifles...?

Parts is parts.

M1 Garand Rebuilds: History & Markings




GR
 

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You are absolutely correct. FN of belgium was tasked with cleaning, lubing, and repairing a whole bunch of M1's after the war in europe. I'm just glad my "CMP special" shoots as well as it does. Gen Patton was correct when he called it "the greatest battle implement ever devised".
 

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You are absolutely correct. FN of belgium was tasked with cleaning, lubing, and repairing a whole bunch of M1's after the war in europe. I'm just glad my "CMP special" shoots as well as it does. Gen Patton was correct when he called it "the greatest battle implement ever devised".
Amen.




GR
 
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