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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One thing about shooting competitively is it gives a shooter an appreciation for what the lowly old fashioned 1911 and its antiquated 230 gr FMJ (hardball), ammunition can do. Since we had to shoot out to 50 yards anyway it was logical that some of us take the next step and try its designed capability of 100 meters.

Turns out if you can keep them on paper at 50 yards you can keep them on paper at 100 yards. Then it gets tricky when you move on out to 200 yards. We lost a lot of shooters because most could not be persuaded to try it. Those of us that did were rewarded with a large learning curve involving lots of misses and then the good string. The reward was great. :D

Most of us moved quickly from paper targets to reactive targets because we wanted to do a lot of shooting before going down 200 yards to the target frame to check progress. Everything was game, the 1 gallon plastic milk jugs filled with water that we commonly used at 100 yards was good but they were pretty much a one time proposition and carrying a dozen full jugs down range was pretty heavy work. Range wouldn't let us bring a tanker down there and refused to install a well for us to fill our empty bottles.

What to do, what to do? Only thing was to get targets with a wee bit more lastability that we could leave behind and expect to still be there when we came back to shoot again. I'm not a believer in leaving trash behind but a 5 gallon milk pail filled with sand placed on the berm made a fairly long lasting target and gave an audible feed back. A bowling pin laying near it also gave a nice reaction when you hit it assuming the rifle shooters didn't home in on it. Our 22's were audible, 38's. 9MM and .357 moved it a little and the .357's were harder on the pins than they were on the bucket.

44's and 44 magnums were fun too but the giggle tickler was to pull out the old 45 and sure enough there would always be at least one wiseacre to tell us the bullet would not go that far and after 25 yards you might as well throw the gun at the boogerman because you wouldn't hit him. If you did hit him you would not hurt him because the bullet would be moving so slowly. I even had one genius tell me I had to get up on something high and shoot down hill so the gravity would help the bullet to move faster so it could get that far.

All of us did our shooting standing off hand with no support. You shot, watched for the splash, made your adjustment and shot again. After a few months of doing this our second shot was often a hit. Then to add to the fun the next magazine had to be shot with the weak hand. After awhile of careful record keeping of hits I discovered my left hand was as good as my right hand but at half the shooting speed. The extra concentration to make up for the awkwardness of weak hand shooting made me pay more attention to the sights.

I have no 200 yard targets to show you but here is a target shot in the wind with both 22 and 45, not good but all shots were on paper even if you can't hardly see them. The second target was my 45 alone after a day of shooting nothing but magnum revolvers at 100 yards. I finished the day out with my last 5 rounds of 45 hardball ammo. I won't win any contests with this and am unlikely to ever need this skill but it tickles my giggle.





So come on boys and girls, who all out there likes to shoot beyond 50 yards with your 45 just because you can and find it more fun than should be allowed by law. I told my preacher that this was the most fun a man could have with his clothes on. He refused to smile but he did nod his head in acknowledgement. I am sure he worries about me or maybe figures I am a lost cause.
 

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Sounds like a good time. I always get a kick out of ringin' long range steel - or trying - with the old 45 auto. I've not pursued the practice to the degree you have, mostly just messin' about.

I do have plenty of ammo... hmmm... :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sounds like a good time. I always get a kick out of ringin' long range steel - or trying - with the old 45 auto. I've not pursued the practice to the degree you have, mostly just messin' about.

I do have plenty of ammo... hmmm... :)
Hardest part about the game is recruiting new shooters. To many young AR shooters at the bench shooting 25 yard targets won't even try 50 yards let alone 200. Once I get a youngster to try the first shot with his handgun they are hooked. Took some a little while to get their shots walked up to the target but when they saw me doing it with a 22 and a 45 they were more confident in their 40's and 9MM's. Once they get it in their head that it can be done it turns into. "It must be done." :lol: The clank of their first hit on that old milk pail was as addicting as an (insert sin of choice), but way cheaper and safer.
 
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I had a lot of fun with a bushel of musk melons at 75 yards and my .45; a Springfield I bought in 89. Very reactive, especially when I tried a few of those precious hollow points. Mostly 230 ball. Man that was a long time ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I had a lot of fun with a bushel of musk melons at 75 yards and my .45; a Springfield I bought in 89. Very reactive, especially when I tried a few of those precious hollow points. Mostly 230 ball. Man that was a long time ago.
Time to hit it again, freeze some gallon milk jugs and set them out at 100 yards. Might take awhile to get the range but once you learn the holdover it is a barrel of laughs to watch the old 230 gr hardball tear apart a jug full of ice. It's surprising how little drop there is at that range with that old slow bullet.
 

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I too have done this just messing around while in Fallon, NV; I have a SA 1911 Ultra Compact (officer's grip and 3.5" barrel) and was very pleased to see just how easy it really was to make solid and deliberate hits at 100yds.

The coolest part was that it was late afternoon, and with the sun to our backs we could see the shiny base of the slug reflecting sunlight and watch it all the way to the dune...very cool!!
 
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