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It wouldn't hurt too, but more importantly do it while your scope is new.
 

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Yep,I would follow the good advice given as it will effect shot placement.I learnt the hard way several yrs ago.Good Luck!
 

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I didn't put one in because I was concerned with reliability issues reported, especially if I go to a smaller gas port size. But I also want to scope it, so it is back on my list.

-- Does the buffer have greater reliability problems with smaller gas port ?
-- Has anyone tried using a piece of high-temp rubber gasket material, rather than the thicker commercial buffer, perhaps cementing a piece on either end of the op rod?
-- What is the best thickness and material?
-- How long will it last?

-- cw
 

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I had a problem with a recoil buffer being too thick. It would not allow the op rod/bolt to go back all the way for the bolt hold open catch to fully engage - it would just barely engage by the tip of the corner - it acutually destroyed the corner of the bolt catch - that replacement part cost me $5!
 

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I made mine out of neopreme rubber ( an inner tube would work) I put another one around the gas block. It worked good for about 500 rds, then the heat cracked it. IF a buffer is too thick the bolt may cause some feed problems, but they are easy to sand down some. I use one, and a smaller gas port bushing. ASI also has the gas port kit for $10.95 for 3 different size bushings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I installed the recoil buffer it was not a perfect fit.
I had to shave off a bit off the bottem with a utility knife.
It still doesn't look like a perfect fit.

Is this thing safe to use?
I don't want to damage my rifle.
How can I test it before firing if it will be OK.
Thanks;
Joey
 

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In my experience the buffer just takes a little wearing in. You may want to sand it just enough that your rifle will feed reliably by hand, but don't be afraid of shooting it. You aren't going to hurt anything with a buffer that is too thick. Your op-rod will beat it into place and there will be a bit of compression observable after a period of time. It's just a cushion, like the cartilage in your knee. Run enough and the cartilage will deform from the impacts. I put mine in 'as-issued' and fired it from day one with no malfunctions or abnormal wear.
 

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Joey,

i cut 13 off mine widthwise and put it up against the gas block for a front buffer. before that, the only trouble i had was with the bolt locking open. sometimes i had to try twice.

btw, i have a buffertech.
 

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Joey, to test it load up a mag with your mini in the "safe mode" (safety on, barrel in a safe direction. Sorry I don't mean to sound like a mother, but I like to mention "safety" just as a reminder for all those who read these posts), like I was saying, load up a mag, cycle it manually, all rounds should feed in, and bolt should lock on the last shot.

If it passes this test it should be ok on the range. If not sand a little more off the buffer till it passes the manual test. It can't hurt your rifle in any way, if it's too thick, the rounds may not feed or bolt will not latch. No damage to the mini, only your ego at the range. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I would never complain when someone is talking safety.
It is not addressed enough in my opinion.

I bought the Mini 14 just because I thought it was a safe rifle.

The AR15 has a free floating firing pin.
I believe the AR15 with a round chambered could discharge even with the safety on.
Not a feature I want in a weapon.
 

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I installed a Buffertech stock mini-14 buffer on my mini and it worked just fine I had a vew instances of failure to hold open on the last round but I can attribute that to the 10 round promag mags as it never happens with any of my other mags. Works great and the recoil is reduced somewhat and multiple rounds can be kept on target in 3-5 shot rapid fire strings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I installed recoil buffer and a muzzle brake.
The only problem I had was a double feed due to the magazine.
I don't know the make of it.

The eagle magazine (plastic) worked well but didn't hold action open after last round.

It would be great to be able to buy Ruger factory 20 round magazines.

Thanks everyone.
 

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Joey another safety feature the mini has, the safety is a hammer capture safety. With the safety on the hammer can't fall, even if you drop it! Course we have to have the safety on for it to work. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Cajungeo;
What keeps the firing pin from hitting primer?
If you drop the Mini 14?
Looking at my Mini14, I see how the hammer is held in place when safety is on.
But I can't see how the firing pin is blocked.
I have read else where that it is blocked.
 

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The firing pin by itself can't put a dent in the primer, even if you drop it. It may hit the primer, but it dosen't have enough mass by itself. Kinda like droping a nail point first on a board, it won't even dent it till the hammer drops.

Now I can hear someone out there thinking now what if I drop it off the Empire state building.:rolleyes: Well my answer is, you couldn't get to the top with a mini alive. :p
 

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Originally posted by JoeyMetropolitan
Cajungeo;
What keeps the firing pin from hitting primer?
If you drop the Mini 14?
Looking at my Mini14, I see how the hammer is held in place when safety is on.
But I can't see how the firing pin is blocked.
I have read else where that it is blocked.
Joey -
The firing pin floats and will lightly tap the primer every time it slams home a fresh round. It can dimple a soft primer. The firing pin is floating and inertial, and is prevented from firing out of battery by the firing pin tail being captured [blocked] by the safety bridge, which prevents contact until you have lug engagement. It is NOT blocked when it is in battery, but will not have enough inertia to fire it if dropped.

The safety bridge has a helical cut to retract the firing pin as soon as the bolt rotates out of battery. It's a safe system if everything is in spec, and the firing pin tail is intact; without the tail, the rifle is dangerous and should not be fired.

This design has been around since the 1930s, and has been installed on what, 5 or 6 million rifles (or more?). If there were a problem, we'd know about it, and it would have been resolved 5 million rifles ago.

-- cw
 
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