Perfect Union banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have some sons I want to start training in the fine art of marksmanship. The wife thinks they are too young she thinks 21 would be good. They are 12 and 8. What do you guys think? I believe the olderboy would learn responsiblity and accomplishment as well as getting some quality time together.
I went to the range for the first time when I was 16. I would have loved to go sooner. Next time I fired was courtesy of Uncle Sam.
So guys what do you think give me some ammo to debate the wife.


:cannon: :rapid:

Armor Rules TC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
540 Posts
My kids aren't old enough to walk let alone shoot, but this is my idea: If they are interested, they get a pretend "real " gun. That is a toy gun that must be treated like a real gun. We lock it up with the others etc. If we bring it out, it must be handled safely, with practice shooting session, etc.. Until it is handled 100% safely consistenlty, then they move up to a bb gun. Same rules apply. Next the .22 etc. So, if they're motivated, they can progress to "real" shooting as soon as they have a track record of safe handling.
A great idea, I'm sure reality will be different.;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I have seen this question posted a lot before, and the general consensus always seems to be, "There is no cut-and-dried age." You know how it goes, some people are more mature at 8 than a lot of other people at 40. The best advice I have ever seen is to first take the kids out and do one of those "exploding melon" demonstrations, to show them the power of the weapon. They MUST understand, on a gut level, before they can safely shoot.

Djskit has a good idea; get a realistic looking toy. If they can handle that responsibly, not pointing it at everything, start with BB guns, and then go to single-loaded .22s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
better you show your kids how to use a gun then somebody else. I remember when i was 13 my friend wanted for me and him to shoot his dad's .45 in the woods behind our neighborhood. We didnt because i thought it was a bad idea, but the opportunity was definetly there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,555 Posts
My father and grandfather started me with the ole Daisy BB gun when I was 7. I remember one of the things my grandfather did. He loaded his 1911, which is now mine, and hit a few melons with it. He and dad both explained the rules of gun saftey before I ever saw the BB gun


:sniper:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
As others have said, it depends on the kid and his/her level of responsibility (if we are talking about getting them their own gun). That said, I think EVERY kid should be taught shooting and safety by the time they are 8 or 9.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I started both my daughters when they were nine. Now they are 12 and 17 respectively, and both have their own 22 rifle. They never mess with the guns, either theirs or mine. I spent the time to teach them right, and included them often, especially at cleaning time. If they go shoot, then they know to expect to clean em later. They are not that enthusiastic about shooting, but they want to come with me every time I go. The point is they aren't fascinated with them, they understand what they can do and what they are for.

I keep my personal defense guns out at home regularly. Additionally, I made sure that the rest of the family knows how to get in the safe and get the others if they want to. If you treat something like it's a chore, you take the novelty away. They'd rather do the dishes than clean their guns, even though they are good shots and enjoy shooting. They also respect the sport and have seen the damage a bullet can do firsthand.

I guess it just depends on how mature you are willing to be about it. I know some people who have no business owning firearms, let alone exposing their kids to them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
I think each situation is somewhat different. You will know if the kids are ready to shoot or not. I have a 17 yr old daughter and a 13 yr old daughter. The 17 yr old shot her first gun at 9 yrs old a Ruger 10/22. She enjoyed it but never really had a interest in shooting or hunting so I didn't push it. The 13 yr old is different!! She has taken a Hunter Safety Course (in VA it's mandatory to be able to hunt after age 12) goes groundhog hunting and deer hunting with me and shoots her own xp-100 in 7mmBR and dove hunts with a youth model 870 20ga. She especially likes shooting a Browning Buckmark 22!! I think the important thing is to teach them well to respect a gun and let them see how much fun they can be and show them that they are not just instruments of death as the liberal left would like them to beleive!! Maybe you ought to take the wife out too!! It sounds like she has never had any good experiences with firearms if she thinks the kids ought not have one till age 21!! GHD
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I think djskit has a good idea. Personally I cannot remember being introduced to firearms. They were always in my house and we were always shooting them. My own kids grew up in a house with guns and were around them at the range from a very early age.
Kids are curious and want to learn. If you take the time to teach them about firearms (and a lot of other things) from a very early age they will be far better off than a poor kid raised by the likes of Rosie O'pig and her cohorts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
My daughter is 12 and I am going to teach her. I should have done it sooner. I dont think there is any certain age. It should be when you think they can be responsible. My dad started me shooting when I as 8 .:sniper:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
I have two daughters ages 10 and 13. I will be purchasing a .22 full size pistol probably a Ruger or the like to start teaching my oldest daughter how to shoot. All their lives I have taught them that guns aren't toys and they have never been allowed to play with toy guns. Even though I have a rifle and pistol safe I am confident that if my girls came across an unsecured firearm they would not touch it. I have also trained them to not answer anyone who may ask them if we have any guns in the house especially since this PAX BS about asking the parents of the children your kids play with if they have guns. If they would raise their kids properly they would have the respect for firearms that mine do and they wouldn't have to worry what other people have in their houses.Nascarnhlnra now stepping off soapbox!;) :usa:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The wife was willing to comprimse somewhat. If I start doing other things with my boys I can also introduce some firearms training. Now the other stuff I should have been doing right along but I was always too busy well thats going to change for the better.

Thanks for your imput guys. Though she still doesn't like guns in the house since I'm paying the bills they stay.

Like the old story goes, She said its the guns or me and boy will I miss her.

TC:cannon:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
541 Posts
My boy got his first rifle at 5,first shotgun at 6,will get first pistol at 8.Of course I'm standing right beside him.At 7 now,you don't want him shooting at you.We shoot 2-3 times every week.Old enough to learn,old enough to shoot.:sniper:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I started with a .22 bolt action at 5. Taught my son on the same gun when he was 6.

As others have said though, it depends on the child. I had my son cleaning it, handling it, and drilled on safety before he ever handled any ammo.

One thing you will need to constantly be telling them is "Take your finger off the trigger." It always seems to creep back up there so watch it. Try to be patient and explain the use of iron sights before you get to the range.

I like djskit's idea about the pretend "real" gun. I used a BB gun for that purpose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
541 Posts
Shadow,your damn right about the trigger issue.Thats what I have to remind most.My boy will have to master iron sights before getting a scope.He's pretty close.I bought him a 22 Chipmunk by Rogue rifle Co.Its a nice little rifle.Single shot bolt action,black laminated stock,rear appature sight,pretty accurate for its size.They are made for small children to learn to shoot.They also have a scope mount available if/when you need it.His shotgun is an H&R(New England Arms now) 410 youth.18",matt finish,synthetic stocks.Both are perfect size for small children.The pistol? That'll be a tough one.We'll have to see.Probably a Ruger stainless Single Six 5" 22. :sniper:
 
G

·
I don't have kids, but I remember what it was like to be one. ;) Really, only you know your kids and their responsibilty level. I was shooting supervised-only at 10, target shooting behind the house alone at 12, and hunting alone at 14. I had a lot of support and some excellent instructors. :)

My uncle teaches hunter safety in Kentucky, and he was around to teach me to use a pistol and black powder. Both of my grandads taught me to use long guns. My dad taught me how to hunt. As they say, the rest is history.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
My oldest is seven. If he is responsible enough he will probably start shooting next year. I would like to find a chipmunk, do they still make them? I am not planning to start with a bb gun as I feel that the poor accuracy would be counterproductive unless I buy a good pellet rifle. They are still harder to shoot due to the slow lock time. Once he shows the inclination and respect without fear I will give him a single shot 20 Gauge. I don't expect him to start on a pistol until about 16. The things are just too easy to point at someone accidentally. I agree with the single action .22 though. I have a Ruger super single six in stainless. It has a nice trigger (self-done) and is capable of 2.5 inch 25yd groups and would make a great beginner’s pistol. I am a firm believer in single shots. Particularly for a child learning to hunt.
Jeff :usa:

We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
I got all three of mine started before they were ten. Instead of the exploding melon we used pumpkins with the same result. They were all started with a 410 shotgun and stationary clays as targets. Don't know if it was the excitement of watching the clays break with a good shot or my constant enthusiasim over their success but it kept their attention focused on proper gun handling and safety. Improper gun handling or anything close to safety infractions equaled no more fun.

Well now I have two grandsons that will be four soon. Each one has a Win 37 (1 410,1 20) in the safes for when they are big enough to handle them. With them growing like weeds I hope it won't be too many more years. Might get them started sooner with a little Ruger Bearcat or one of those new-fangled Walther P-22s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
You know what kills me? Shrieking, whining liberals thinking kids should be somehow "shielded" from learning anything about guns. Every post on this thread is good sense. Gun education IS gun safety. Start them as soon as you think their ready to handle the responsibility. When kids dont learn gun safety/responsibility, bad things can happen!! Reminds me of Sarah Brady having the nerve to blame The NRA for her stupid kid pointing a loaded pistol at her...Oh yes, she really did. If she had the foresight of the posters' here, that wouldnt have happened. Good topic.
Cheers, AU2
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
We have always let kids shoot as soon as they can pull a trigger, 2 year olds find out they don't want to do it without dad, BB guns are fine at 5 or 6 , 22's and shotguns at 8-12, big bore as soon as they can load their own,
Black powder guns are good becouse they have a hard time screwing them up and they can't shoot fast - they learn to aim and the noise and smoke helps them learn respect for guns. - they can cast their own bullets, cut their own patches, mount their own flints -AND CLEAN THEM! any thing that lets them have contact with gun and ammunition for a good amount of time without a lot of shooting will help them gain respect and view it as a tool and a machine. - not some exotic magic killing stick.
Buying an old rifle ( let him earn the money and help shop for it )( 10-12 is a good age ) in some oddball caliber is a good way to let a kid grow into it, he can refinish and repair, maybe checker and finish the stock, clean and lap the barrel, cast bullets - even for things like the 6.5 or 7.3 carcano, chose and mount a scope, load shells, and in general have lots of contact time. At verry little expense- black powder kits are a lot the same, let him make his own mountain man clothes to spend more time. Good thing about this is the kid doesn't visualize himself as the "A" team. More like sgt York.
Allways talk about the right and wrong places to carry, shoot and , nowdays, talk about guns. Go to the range or a safe place often enough to control the itch, and have a good locking gun safe. (an old school locker bolted to the wall will suffice most places) parents should keep the key.
Good luck, I hope this isn't overwhelming.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top