Perfect Union banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,759 Posts
I don't reload, but I have a friend who does. I give him all my brass and he gives me some boxes of his reloads. He says he never reloads his own brass more than three times. All his reloads fire properly for me. I'm just a target shooter, and at the 50, 100, and 200 yard distances I have available, they seem just as accurate as the "new" factory ammo I buy and use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,228 Posts
It all depends on the brass and how it is treated. I have .308 Win brass that has been reloaded 13 times! .45 ACP brass can be reloaded indefinitely. Some brass won't make more than 2 times. All depends on the Brass and the gun it is fired from.

Randy
 

·
Draw, Varmint!
Joined
·
782 Posts
What brass, and what load?

I have lightly charged straight-wall pistol brass that has been reloaded between 15 and 20 times. I have bottlenecked rifle cartridges that have been reloaded as many as 8 to 10 times.

I am also wondering what else your question might be inferring?

(1) Do you know how to check fired brass for defects and/or 'incipient case head separation'?
(2) Do you own an interior wall case scraper? (Often made from a 6 inch piece of wire coat hanger.)
(3) Do you clean your brass, and roll it out for examination and/or drying prior to sizing?
(4) Do you know how to grab a handful of brass and jiggle it while listening for the right sound(s) to occur?

In summation: The more you handle your brass during the reloading process the better you should recognize and understand what quality of brass you are working with. Today there is a wide variation in the wall thickness and quality of commercial cartridge brass. Some of it is absolute crap, and might be good for only a few reloads. And then there's high quality brass like Lapua, or Norma, or even Starline and Hornady that can be reloaded many times over.

I've had good luck with Winchester, Remington, and some (but not all) Federal brass as well. My suggestion would be for you to 'learn how to read your brass', and stay away from stuff that shows a lot of split mouths, and (a sure indicator of doom) loose primer pockets! Good luck to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,421 Posts
rimmed brass case can be loaded until splits or primer pocket loosens. semi-auto brass - no rims, the case is grooved at the head for the extractor cut - can be loaded many times but when the groove gets beat up from many ejections could cause fail to feed or eject. some brass alloys can be susceptible to work hardening, and case necks of those alloys will split if not annealed. I've loaded .357 cases some 10 times maybe more, but necked cases usually 3-4 times and some will split w/out annealing. when extractor grooves get beaten up (semi-autos) best ditch them.
evidently 'lone gunman' has some hands-on experience, good advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,233 Posts
It is not how may times you can use it,
It's quality of use high pressure hunting loads = less
Target type Low pressure loads = more.
Type of brass also makes a marked difference.
Straight wall = more.
Bottleneck = less.
Type of weapon also makes a difference.
Does your weapon have a tight or loose chamber.
Is the weapon semi auto, bolt or break action.
Will you small base resize or use standard dies.
It's more complicated then your question assumes.
This is an oversimplification but simple works for me.
Follow Randy, Lone Gunman, and Marlin 45's
advice if you understand what they are talking about....
If you do not buy a good reloading manual that explains
basic reloading, Lyman's make a manual that will explain
reloading to you and give you help with definitions.
I assume you are new to reloading and the quality controls
involved.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,863 Posts
I have some lots of .303 British brass that has been reloaded over -ready for it- 50 times!
There are many, many variables as to brass life.
The strength or springiness of the action, the size and quality of the chamber, The amount of sizing done to the case, the pressure the cartridge is loaded to, the treatment of the spent case all have a role in the life of the case.
To put it into perspective, All my bolt gun brass is neck, or partially-neck-sized, and the loads are kept to mid-range or less levels. My match winning recipe for VIMBAR competition with my No.5, Mk.1 Enfield carbine has a muzzle velocity of 2050-2100 FPS, and you can watch the bullets go down range through the spotting scope! This will significantly increase brass life.
My M1 Garand and M1A are the hardest on brass, as they must be full length resized, and the action requires a certain amount of gas to properly function. That means chamber pressures right around 50k PSI, and port pressures of about 4k PSI for the Garand, and about double that for the M1A.
The important thing to take away is how to inspect your brass as to condition, and knowing when to retire a particular lot of brass.
Unfortunately, only YOU can determine when your brass is tired, as YOU are the one loading it, and can directly observe it's condition.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,421 Posts
more important than brass life is correct powder charge. you didn't mention what you're loading but if pistol it's imperative you double check the powder charge. the fast burning powders - bullseye, red dot, aa1 - can easily double charge with catastrophic results. so far I haven't had happen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
316 Posts
more important than brass life is correct powder charge. you didn't mention what you're loading but if pistol it's imperative you double check the powder charge. the fast burning powders - bullseye, red dot, aa1 - can easily double charge with catastrophic results. so far I haven't had happen
True.
When I bought a progressive reloader many years ago, I got a Dillon 650 with the automatic advance system; that makes it very unlikely (but not impossible) to double charge a case. Then I bought the Dillon powder checker die which will beep if the charge level in the case is too high or too low. The "beeper" in the checker die seems to have a shorter life span than I like but I replace when needed and no longer worry about over/under charges.

With a light mounted in the 650 toolhead, I could easily spot a double charge in .380 or 9mm with my powder (Alliant Power Pistol). In .38 Spl or .357 Mag, a double charge would still be invisible, so I like the mechanical aids.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top