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Amrhein
I would, but that's the first page I used.
My point is that you can NOT look at a data page and see where a given set of load data came from.

BTW, you do know that one of the biggest variables in load data is bullet design/construction, don't you? Switching from Brand A to Brand B and making no other changes has blown up many a rifle.
But, if your happy using second hand & obsolete data in your rifle, than all I can say is "go for it".
OTOH, my barrel blanks cost almost as much as a Mini, and by the time they're threaded, chambered and installed my barrels are worth a lot more than a stock Mini.
I've been reloading now for over 30 yrs, please don't try to insult my inteligence with the A and B brand. I have used the same type projectiles in all I load, rifle and pistol both. I have NEVER had any type of malfunction when it comes to reloading or my reloads, and what do your barrle blanks have to do with anything.
 

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I have used LEE manual for years and I thank they are a very good. I all so use Lyman and Accurate Hornady Sierra and Loadbooks USA If you will read the front of LEE and Lyman good before starting to reload you should NOT have any trouble when you start. NONE of them will give you a over load or a under load. Under loads is one to look out for.;)
 

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You can have two bullets that are the same weight, but different shape, the one will have much less contact area than the other. The one with more contact area will have far greater pressure.
Get good manuels, spend the money.
Also buy the book "The ABC's of Reloading", lots of good info for the beginner.
I have been loading for 30 years. I've never blown up a gun, but had some awful hot loads in the beginning.
Slow down. The max load is almost never the most accurate.
A max load VS a mid load will put 75% more wear on your barrel.

Go easy and do it right or don't do it at all. You are just going to hurt yourself or someone else.

It takes time to really learn the ropes of reloading. Take the time, you have lots of it.
Reloading is very enjoyable, go easy and enjoy, don't try to take shortcuts and always work your way up in your loads. Be sure you know the signs of too much pressure, they start slow and build as you load hotter.
Also, look at the data in the books, there are many powders that have lower pressure but still have good FPS. They may be good one's to start with.

Best Regards, John K
 

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There are 7,000 grains in a pound of powder. Just divide 7,000 by your charge weight and you will have your answer. dmen
figure 7000 grains in one pound of powder. a .223 cartridge uses approx. 25 grains. divide 7000 by 25 and you get 280. so a pound will do 280 rounds approximately.
Here above are the best answers concerning your question. No one without having loaded and tested the rounds in your rifle can give you an exact number. I suggest to all that we play nice in regards to our opinions. It is important to read the instructions in any reloading manual before you begin using their loads. Most of the time loads are based on specific components and often are designed for certain style of firearms, example would be that many loads for a Thompson Contender cannot be shot out of a lever gun. With the lawsuit happy populace, reloading manuals are most often very conservative, make sure to work your way up rather than starting from a max load, and check all fired rounds for signs of excessive pressures. Two identical guns can fire the same load, one will show excessive pressure, the other will not. In the end, it is gun specific. The NRA has classes to learn reloading and they may be available in your area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Question answered.......

Here above are the best answers concerning your question. No one without having loaded and tested the rounds in your rifle can give you an exact number. I suggest to all that we play nice in regards to our opinions. It is important to read the instructions in any reloading manual before you begin using their loads. Most of the time loads are based on specific components and often are designed for certain style of firearms, example would be that many loads for a Thompson Contender cannot be shot out of a lever gun. With the lawsuit happy populace, reloading manuals are most often very conservative, make sure to work your way up rather than starting from a max load, and check all fired rounds for signs of excessive pressures. Two identical guns can fire the same load, one will show excessive pressure, the other will not. In the end, it is gun specific. The NRA has classes to learn reloading and they may be available in your area.
Yeah, I think my question has been adequately answered, and you can close the thread if you want...
 

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One other thing to add if you go to a progressive loader.
The stick type powders will vary .2 to .3 grains per load because they many times get stuck and break off in the powder drum causing an uneven load.

The ball powders are far more consisitant.

If you are loading for maximum accuracy, prep every case and get a single stage press and use an automatic powder measure or weigh each charge yourself.

If top accuracy is not as big of a deal. the progressive will work fine.

I use a progressive for loading massive amounts of 45 auto and use a single stage for rifle rounds. Accutacy is my #1 thing in a rifle and the only way to get the maximum accuracy is to take your time and load properly prepped cases one at a time.

Just my opinion and 2 cents.

best Regards, John K
 

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Yeah, I think my question has been adequately answered, and you can close the thread if you want...
Threads only get closed when there is poor behavior being exhibited. There still can be plenty of info to be had from others. Hope you find the answers you are looking for.
 

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I hate buying something only to lose money on it later...lol. Buy good equipment from the start and you will keep it forever and have less headaches as well. I do a bit of reloading and have set on the Dillon 550B as the most versatile press available. Can be used as a single stage and as a 4 station turret. Will load just about anything but 50 BMG and your grandkids will still be using it long after you are gone. Yes it is a more expensive press but it is also the only one you will ever need.

I do use a Lee turret at times and have a huge old Hollywood single stage set up (it gets used for full length sizing large brass mostly). And, of course I have different presses for shotgun. But the Dillon 550's are my go to presses, even over my Dillon 650. Nothing wrong with Dillon Blue...

I have 2 single stage presses and one 4 hole turret press. None of them go un used. They all have paid for themselves. When I first got into reloading the books were somewhat inadequate and i learned a bunch about reloading the hard way. Trial and error. I don't suggest it but it was all I had. If Dillion would of been around back then I still would of started out with a single stage press anyway. Now we have Youtube and the inna' net. That really helps those young guys starting out . Something that just wasn't around in 1976. If I were 20 years younger I would have a Dillion or something similar but I'm never giving up my single stage presses.
kwg
 
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