Perfect Union banner
1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
838 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Once the economy gets better, and business picks up, I will probably buy a progressive press and start reloading, but 1st, I looked around the net for prices of all cartridge components so I could get an idea how much it'll cost to reload my own shells, or how much I'll save. When looking into powders, I went to Usamidway.com and in their powder section there were 21 pages with 16 different choices of powders on each page! That's over 330 options! Granted some were the same powders in 3 different size jugs(1lb, 4lb, 8lb), but thats still a LOT of choices!:wacko:


My question is: When reloading .223 brass with a 69 grain Sierra Match HPBT, or Hornady 75gr, BTHP bullets, how many cartridges should you get out of a pound of powder? How about if the shell is loaded with 55gr, FMJ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,398 Posts
Step one is to purchase a QUALITY reloading manual, and study it. I suggest Sierra and Nosler (or whoever makes the bullets your going to use). Study the "intro to reloading" section first, than look at the recogmended powders for the cartridge/bullet weight your planning to try (not all powders are suitable for all cases).

AVOID the "one book one cartridge" and other "recycled data" (LEE) manuals, and stick with the most current ones (at least until you have a few thousand rounds in several different cartridges under your belt)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
First off find a store near you to buy reloading stuff form. You DO NOT want to try to by powder or primers mail order. The HAZMAT fees will kill you. Second, as was stated above read some manuals and handloading instruction books. Third, start with a single stage press, at least until you get familiar with what you are doing. Too many moving parts and to many operations at once are a recipe for disaster.

Just my $.02

Sean
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,250 Posts
You DO NOT want to try to by powder or primers mail order. The HAZMAT fees will kill you.

Sean
Well maybe if you only buy one pound at a time. If you buy in bulk or put a large order together with a few buddies, online ordering can and is way cheaper, even with the $20 Hazmat fee.

Online powder runs about $5-6/pound less than my local shops, Online primers are about $8-10/K cheaper. Order 5k primers and 5-10 pounds of powder and you have saved a bunch more $$ than the $20 Hazmat fee.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,288 Posts
I suggest you start with a single reloader and WORK your way to a progressive. I suggest you know what you are doing before you shell out the bucks for a progressive. There is a lot of used reloaders and equipment out there. Get good with that then buy the progressive. kwg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
I suggest you start with a single reloader and WORK your way to a progressive. I suggest you know what you are doing before you shell out the bucks for a progressive. There is a lot of used reloaders and equipment out there. Get good with that then buy the progressive. kwg
I hate buying something only to lose money on it later...lol. Buy good equipment from the start and you will keep it forever and have less headaches as well. I do a bit of reloading and have set on the Dillon 550B as the most versatile press available. Can be used as a single stage and as a 4 station turret. Will load just about anything but 50 BMG and your grandkids will still be using it long after you are gone. Yes it is a more expensive press but it is also the only one you will ever need.

I do use a Lee turret at times and have a huge old Hollywood single stage set up (it gets used for full length sizing large brass mostly). And, of course I have different presses for shotgun. But the Dillon 550's are my go to presses, even over my Dillon 650. Nothing wrong with Dillon Blue...

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
447 Posts
Step one is to purchase a QUALITY reloading manual, and study it. I suggest Sierra and Nosler (or whoever makes the bullets your going to use). Study the "intro to reloading" section first, than look at the recogmended powders for the cartridge/bullet weight your planning to try (not all powders are suitable for all cases).

AVOID the "one book one cartridge" and other "recycled data" (LEE) manuals, and stick with the most current ones (at least until you have a few thousand rounds in several different cartridges under your belt)
Very good info ! Also the Lyman book is very good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
447 Posts
I hate buying something only to lose money on it later...lol. Buy good equipment from the start and you will keep it forever and have less headaches as well. I do a bit of reloading and have set on the Dillon 550B as the most versatile press available. Can be used as a single stage and as a 4 station turret. Will load just about anything but 50 BMG and your grandkids will still be using it long after you are gone. Yes it is a more expensive press but it is also the only one you will ever need.

I do use a Lee turret at times and have a huge old Hollywood single stage set up (it gets used for full length sizing large brass mostly). And, of course I have different presses for shotgun. But the Dillon 550's are my go to presses, even over my Dillon 650. Nothing wrong with Dillon Blue...

HELLO I am a IN. man also.I like your MOPAR sign.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
I do like the LEE Modern Reloading 2nd Edition, it has a greater selection of Cal. powders, and projectiles than many of the other manuals out there. Many of the others are just trying to sell you there stuff so they don't cover certain powders or projectiles. I also have some of the other manuals, which are also good but are not my only referance. I have never had any problems with useing the Lee manual, it is upto date for what I use and in some cases even more accurate than the others, but it's always up to the person what they choose.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,250 Posts
I do like the LEE Modern Reloading 2nd Edition, it has a greater selection of Cal. powders, and projectiles than many of the other manuals out there. Many of the others are just trying to sell you there stuff so they don't cover certain powders or projectiles. I also have some of the other manuals, which are also good but are not my only referance. I have never had any problems with useing the Lee manual, it is upto date for what I use and in some cases even more accurate than the others, but it's always up to the person what they choose.
This is simply NOT True. Lee has never tested a load and never will. They beg, borrow and steel load data from others that have actually taken the time and expense to pressure test there products, Nosler, Sierra, Speer, Hornady, Hodgdon, Alliant, Ramshot and AA to name a few. This is a very expensive process and they cannot test every combo on the planet just to suit your needs.

They are NOT trying to sell you "their Stuff" they are trying to keep your head, face and hands intact. Lee data can be had for free on any of the powder, bullet manufactures web sites for free. Just take the time to compile it all, put into a book and sell it, and there you have the Lee manual.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
This is simply NOT True. Lee has never tested a load and never will. They beg, borrow and steel load data from others that have actually taken the time and expense to pressure test there products, Nosler, Sierra, Speer, Hornady, Hodgdon, Alliant, Ramshot and AA to name a few. This is a very expensive process and they cannot test every combo on the planet just to suit your needs.

They are NOT trying to sell you "their Stuff" they are trying to keep your head, face and hands intact. Lee data can be had for free on any of the powder, bullet manufactures web sites for free. Just take the time to compile it all, put into a book and sell it, and there you have the Lee manual.
What part is not true of what I have said. NOWHERE did I state that Lee nor does Lee claim that they have test a load. Please read again, and you can ask any supplier about selling their STUFF and they will tell you yes we are. And as you said Lee compiled that data and sold it and it covers more data in one book that most of the other manuals out there on the market. Not long ago on another site someone ask about a reciped for a round, someone gave some wrong info, I was using the Lee manual and corrected the issue, the other person then said OOOPS that he was using and older manual from someone else with outdated information, Disaster avoided.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,250 Posts
Like I said, everything in the Lee manual can be had for free online, everything. Lee is not only selling "their" stuff, they are selling other peoples stuff. Why pay Lee when you can have it for free, updated not outdated and for free. The Lee manual is a joke, an expensive joke.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,398 Posts
I find the LEE manual to be very valuable, as emergency paper in the outhouse.

While I have very little use for the "one cal one book" manuals that are out there, at least they attribute their data to the source (unlike LEE)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts
Once the economy gets better, and business picks up, I will probably buy a progressive press and start reloading, but 1st, I looked around the net for prices of all cartridge components so I could get an idea how much it'll cost to reload my own shells, or how much I'll save. When looking into powders, I went to Usamidway.com and in their powder section there were 21 pages with 16 different choices of powders on each page! That's over 330 options! Granted some were the same powders in 3 different size jugs(1lb, 4lb, 8lb), but thats still a LOT of choices!:wacko:

My question is: When reloading .223 brass with a 69 grain Sierra Match HPBT, or Hornady 75gr, BTHP bullets, how many cartridges should you get out of a pound of powder? How about if the shell is loaded with 55gr, FMJ?
figure 7000 grains in one pound of powder. a .223 cartridge uses approx. 25 grains. divide 7000 by 25 and you get 280. so a pound will do 280 rounds approximately.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
I find the LEE manual to be very valuable, as emergency paper in the outhouse.

While I have very little use for the "one cal one book" manuals that are out there, at least they attribute their data to the source (unlike LEE)
Maybe you should read the Foreword in the manual.

"Comprehensive load data, compiled from all major powder suppliers published information, sorted in logical cartridge, bullet weight and velocity order". On the next page it lists the sources from where they got their data. Everybody has their own opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,398 Posts
Amrhein
I would, but that's the first page I used.
My point is that you can NOT look at a data page and see where a given set of load data came from.

BTW, you do know that one of the biggest variables in load data is bullet design/construction, don't you? Switching from Brand A to Brand B and making no other changes has blown up many a rifle.
But, if your happy using second hand & obsolete data in your rifle, than all I can say is "go for it".
OTOH, my barrel blanks cost almost as much as a Mini, and by the time they're threaded, chambered and installed my barrels are worth a lot more than a stock Mini.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts
Amrhein
I would, but that's the first page I used.
My point is that you can NOT look at a data page and see where a given set of load data came from.

BTW, you do know that one of the biggest variables in load data is bullet design/construction, don't you? Switching from Brand A to Brand B and making no other changes has blown up many a rifle.
But, if your happy using second hand & obsolete data in your rifle, than all I can say is "go for it".
OTOH, my barrel blanks cost almost as much as a Mini, and by the time they're threaded, chambered and installed my barrels are worth a lot more than a stock Mini.
I learned the hard way through a buddy who would use max charges regardless of the components. his method of reason was if it wasnt safe they wouldnt print it... He built a sweet sweet! remington rifle around a M40 barrel he got off a marine sniper friend of ours. He burst that barrel ruining the entire rifle after weeks of tedious work also blew the front bell off a $1300 Mark 4 scope. 3 grand down the crapper in a hundredth of a second. use those loads as reference and always work up your loads anytime you change a thing back it off and work it back up!!!!
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top