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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I first start with clean .223 brass. I have a crap load of LC brass so this is where I start.

I then re-size using the 300 BLK Sizer die. My co-ax press has lots of leverage for the job. I use a generous amount of lube inside the neck. I check each to insure that the shoulder is back far enough using a Wilson Case Gage. I then trim to length using a drill and my RCBS trimmer. Cuts it like a warm knife through butter.

Next stop is to clean the edges with a power chamfer tool:

Compact Triple-Head Case Prep Machine from Hornady « Daily Bulletin

I then clean them again in my Covington 250 Tumbler and they are ready for loading. I have used AA5744, H110, and AA1680 to load them. I have tried bullets of 120, 150, and 168 grains.

Anyone else make and load their own 300 BLK brass?
 

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Nobody has replied yet?

Well I don't even have a 300 Blackout barrel, but that was a great post dh1633pm! :cool:

Something I might now consider getting in the future.

Great picture too!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. Just sharing information. I love the Blackout. If solves the problem of 7.62x39 in the AR series. The performance is almost identical doesn't need special mags or bolt and the choice of bullets range from 100 grains or even less, all the way past 200 grains. The efficiency of the round means less powder is needed.
 

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This is interesting as I just decided that my next AR build will be chambered in the .300 Blackout. I have a couple thousand once fired .556 cases that are ideal candidates for this cartridge.

Earlier today I ordered a set of .300 Blackout dies from Redding and they're scheduled to arrive next week. I have powder, primer, and .30 caliber tips so I'll have starter loads but nothing to fire them in....:lol:

Thanks for the information!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It has been working well for me. I even experimented with a few converted "blank" rounds. Worked great. I have had no problems with any of the converted brass.
 

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I will. I am doing both. I will be setting up to trim and resize a bunch of 5.56 brass and I have a source for 300 BO brass. Right now I am trying to locate my bullet tray, bin, and my scale. Bought a house last year and have been steadily unpacking and making improvements. Just got the shop cleaned out enough to set up my press!!

I have several friends who reload 300 BO, so I will be using some of their already tested data. I run a 9" SBR and a 16" carbine, both with Wilson barrels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It took me a while when I moved into my current home to get all my reloading equipment setup on a new bench. Little by little it got done. It doesn't really take a long time to convert. I started down the road of trim first then re size. Then I figured I would try to just re size then trim. With a lot of neck lub it worked. The power trimmer is what makes it possible, although I might been a new trim head (if that is what they are called). I also purchased a LE Wilson Gage so I could check out my work. Good luck with the setup.
 

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I use a Harbor freight 2" bench top cut off saw and hold the head of the case right at the vise end and cut off the 223 cases near the shoulder. Then size and trim them using the Lee trimming tool. It's pretty quick and The only problem I have had was with brand new factory Hornady cases that I foolishly didn't resize. The bullets set back from recoil. The home brew cases worked perfectly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I use a Harbor freight 2" bench top cut off saw and hold the head of the case right at the vise end and cut off the 223 cases near the shoulder. Then size and trim them using the Lee trimming tool. It's pretty quick and The only problem I have had was with brand new factory Hornady cases that I foolishly didn't resize. The bullets set back from recoil. The home brew cases worked perfectly.
I was thinking of getting one. In anticipation I ordered one of these:

300 Blackout Case Cut Off Cutting Jig Fixture Forming Trimmer 556 223 Guard | eBay

I thought about cutting them first, but wasn't sure about repeatability in the cuts. Trimming such a large amount of brass works, but it would be nice to eliminate as many steps in the process as possible. All my converted cases worked well. Even those created from using old blank ammo. It's nice to reuse .223 brass that has a split neck or has a neck deformation due to a reloading mistake. When processing 223 brass I keep a container where I put my rejects for 300 BLK conversion.
 

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I looked at that cutting jig you bought. It looks like it will be perfect and save a bit of trimming without making them to short. I've seen other jigs on ebay but the price they were asking was crazy. That one is reasonable and well built. I had the Harbor Freight tool laying around, never used so it worked out well for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I like the way it has a taper so you can hold the brass more steady. That was the only reason I never tried cutting them first. Trimming them is fast with a trimmer, but it leaves a lot of trimmings laying around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Got the jig. Was in Syracuse for the Car show today. Was driving home when my wife said it was jelly doughnut month. So we headed to a bakery a good distance further. There was a Harbor Freight nearby so I picked up a mini saw. After the SU win tonight I went to the basement and cut about 50 of them. I have to final trim them, but I have to say the process is much faster.
 
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