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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Cajungeo,

I purchased Mike Knifong's video and know how to bed the rifle now, but I don't quite know what to do in regards to the overmolded sections of my Hogue stock.

The rear of the receiver pushes rather deeply into the rubber as does the triggerguard assembly - do I need to rough up these sections and bed them with Acraglas gel? If so, how thrashed up does the rubber overmolding get?

Did you bed all the separated channels underneath the forearm liner and stock cap assembly? That's a lot of empty space between the dividing reinforcements but it seems pretty rigid; Z-Man bedded under the liner on his RR but I don't think he had a Hogue stock.

I'm planning on roughing up the interior with a Dremel and bedding it in sections:
first, bedding around all the recoil lugs, then wrapping the receiver up with a big rubber band so it can settle and cure where it wants, and then trim it all up. Once it is fairly well cured, I'll bed the taped-up trigger group where it wants to fit in and trim it all up again when cured.

Any help you, or anyone else on the board, can provide will be appreciated. Thanks for the great forum board.

Mughi-14
 

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Welcome to the forum Mughi-14. After reading your questions, you may want to view the video again. The only thing you bed is the receiver to the stock. Do not bed the Forearm, or Forearm Liner & Stock Cap Assy., Do not bed the trigger group.

The Hogue is a little easier to bed than the std stock, as we don't have the "Stock Reinforcement" to wory about. Also do not bed the top of the stock under the receiver, as it dosen't bond well the the rubber. I rehearsed it 3 times, but opted to latch my trigger group, over the rubber bands, as the rubber bands didn't seem to hold the receiver down firmly enough.

I used release agent (2 coats) on all metal parts, and the trigger group. I applied tape on the stock to catch the squeeze out. If you get some on the rubber, use Denatured Alcohol to clean it off before it dries. After curring over night, remove to clean off excess, but do not shoot for several days 3 or 4, as it won't be fully curred till then.

If there are air pockets in the epoxy reapply release agent to metal, abrade the pocket, and apply more epoxy, assemble your mini, and let cure again. This isn't something to get into a hurry. Just take your time, rehearse, and think it thru. You will like the results. :D It worked for me. Good luck, and let us know how it turns out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Cajungeo.

The info for bedding under the forearm liner came from an old Guns and Ammo article from '87 - he bedded a lot of stuff there. I thought Z-Man did the same, but could be wrong.

As for the rubber on the stock, I'm glad I don't have to tear it all up. I like it a lot. The triggerguard section bedding I was referring to was the two legs that straddle the mag well - Mike beds it there and under the plate directly behind the trigger itself.

Will send a range report when I get it done - and I'm looking for a friend with a digital camera to post my Ruger in the gallery.

Much appreciated.

Mughi-14
 

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The 2 legs in the mag well, are the recoil lugs. They transfer the recoil from the barrel/receiver to the stock, they obsorb, and transfer recoil energy to the stock. If there is no movement your gun recoils as 1 piece. Tighter groups, and no flyers, unless the shooter causes it! ;)
 

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Hey Cajungeo,

How well (ie, how much "slop") did your Hogue fore end fit? My Hogue is a good, tight fit at the receiver but is sloppy in the fore stock, and there is no room to adjust the gasblock (due to the gasport placement) to "brace" the stock. It is so loose that when I grip the fore stock and shake the rifle, the barrel/gasblock rattle side to side. The factory stock has a great fit but I prefer the fit and feel of the Hogue and would like to use it. Suppose that I can bed (or shim) the fore end to get a tighter fit?
:sniper: cbarry
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Cbarry,

Did you get the forearm liner out of the original stock? It sounds to me like that might be missing. I have absolutely no slop at all in my stock, especially in the fore end.

Without the liner (like when I was setting up for bedding), the gas port was flopping all over the place (plenty of play).

If not and the liner is present in the Hogue, you could bed under the ferrule (the curved section of the liner that covers the tip of the stock) to eliminate the play. It would probably bind the liner there forever (not sure that release compund would get it loose), but they are only $6.50 or so from Ruger... so it's not too big a loss.

I'd like to know what you find out.

Mughi-14
 

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Hey cbarry. Mughi-14 has my first thought. Without the forearm liner, your gas piston will take some hard hits, as this also guides the slide assembly. The receiver will "seem" tight with the trigger group latched. Take out the trigger group, and check for side to side movement. This is how much it will move under fire. My .030" movement caused 3" flyers at 100 yds.
 

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You guys were right on. I didn't transfer the stock liner as Carl at ASI had placed a small amount of compound in the fore end of the factory stock to help the fit when he pinned it, and I didn't want to disturb that work--never know when I may want to go back to it. I willl pick up another stock liner and looking into bedding the Hogue. I know Mike K. has a video out...need to check it out and see if I want to do it myself.
 
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