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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!

Im just starting to shoot, I'm looking to buy a good rifle to shoot at long range, something easy because I'm a beginner but would still be good as I get better.
Not to worry about the price. Also something that looks pretty cool:p
 

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1) Define long range (to you)
2) What are you planning to shoot at that range (paper or hair)
3) Just how serious are you
4) What is your realistic budget? Entry level for top end glass is $1200 (Nightforce), plus 20MOA bases (figure $100+) and rings (another $50+)

Just starting out, buy a used target grade 22lr bolt action, mount a decent scope (something in the $300-500 range) on it and once your shooting small groups at 100yd, and have learned to read the wind, move back to 200yd.

Below is my new LR deer plinker, just so you'll know I have a clue about the topic
 

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Mastery of ballistics is the name of the game. Pick something chambered for an affordable round, and also prepare to reload. Stay away from exotic calibers until you earn your stripes.

Savage has some very nicely priced bolt guns. I would shop for one in .308 Winchester. That will allow you to work 500-750 yards, with 1000 yards possible in good conditions.
 

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$400 for a scope on a .22lr, huh? :) oh jesus. Look guys, there is more variation in wind and range-drop (with a target velocity .22lr) than there is in group size, with any thing that is realistically attributable to the scope. :) That's funny
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mastery of ballistics is the name of the game. Pick something chambered for an affordable round, and also prepare to reload. Stay away from exotic calibers until you earn your stripes.

Savage has some very nicely priced bolt guns. I would shop for one in .308 Winchester. That will allow you to work 500-750 yards, with 1000 yards possible in good conditions.
Ok thank you, so you are recomending a savage to start of with. any model in particular? and what about optics. which would be a nice one for this rifle? and should the optic be around the same price of the rifle? i heard people say that
 

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Your budget will play a big part. You will get a lot more accuracy on the far end if you spend the money for a fully floated, heavy barrel. You will enjoy the ergonomics of a precision stock over a traditional sporter. If you really desire a long range weapon, rather than a capable hunting rifle, you will need to spend a bit more.
I am really impressed with the Savage Model 10. The model 10/110BA is their max tactical precision rifle. It's got it all, but will run you $1800 or so ($2200 MSRP). It was tested against much more expensive rifles of similar features recently and walked away with the judges rulings. You don't have to spend that to get a capable gun, though. The same rifle in a simple precision stock is half that money, and the sporter version is probably around $600. Consider two things. If you buy the bad boy, you'll likely never need an upgrade. If you buy lower line, you can always upgrade with a precision stock later, or custom tailor as you decide what you want.
As for scopes, spend good money on a brand with a lifetime warranty. I am sold on Leupold, but there are others. Take a look at SS scopes from SWFA. Also think about the range you will be shooting at. Do you have access to a 500-1000 yard target? You will want something like a 20x 42 to 50 mm objective. Bare minimum will be $300-$500, with quality optics running more like $1000 to $1200. Again, you may want to start low until you decide what you really want. Go watch some long range shooters, ask opinions and sit behind everything you can before you buy.
Most of the serious shooters will be using handloads in some odd caliber. Beware of that trap. It's expensive to shoot. Buy a .308 Win and you shoot cheap, begin reloading when you get ready, and have a barrel that is easily rechambered for another cartridge if you like. When you do consider other calibers, shop ammo before you choose. You'l be amazed at how it will spin your head.
 

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$400 for a scope on a .22lr, huh? :) oh jesus. Look guys, there is more variation in wind and range-drop (with a target velocity .22lr) than there is in group size, with any thing that is realistically attributable to the scope. :) That's funny
Well Tap/Gun Kid/your other names, you have to be able to see the target clearly. That's the reason for good glass. Learning to compensate for the wind is the reason for using a 22 (besides, it's inexpensive to shoot).

Ask your mother if she can take you to a real gun store to actually look through the various grades of optics
 

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1) Define long range (to you)
2) What are you planning to shoot at that range (paper or hair)
3) Just how serious are you
4) What is your realistic budget? Entry level for top end glass is $1200 (Nightforce), plus 20MOA bases (figure $100+) and rings (another $50+)

Just starting out, buy a used target grade 22lr bolt action, mount a decent scope (something in the $300-500 range) on it and once your shooting small groups at 100yd, and have learned to read the wind, move back to 200yd.

Below is my new LR deer plinker, just so you'll know I have a clue about the topic
Good info, but your last sentence is ridiculous. Posting a picture of a/your gun shows ZERO about your clue on ANYTHING. I could post NASCAR photos and say I drive a car but it doesn't mean much to those that know. Plus if the OP really is new to long range, he would know the difference between an elbow and an a-hole on a precision gun like yours. FWIW

ROLLY
 

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Rolly, Are you implying that is NOT my rifle, or my living room?

This is a board that leans strongly to 223Rem chambered bullet hoses. I'm one of the few members that's more into the longer ranges, and one of the very few that are shooting hair at those ranges.

As far as your last sentence goes, that's the very reason that I didn't post the details about that rifle.

Perhaps you would have preferred a photo of my "mid-range" (sub 500yd) deer plinker looking over one of my hunting fields?
 

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Baloney, Leupold guarantees their gold ring line of scopes for LIFE, no questions asked, and you can pick them up in used condition, with plenty of clarity to see the silly .22lr distances, for $150 and less, all day long at gunshows. Dealers will let you take one right off of almost any common hunting rifle that you see at a show, for that kind of money. way better than you can possibly see any difference in with a 22lr. wind effect at such close ranges and long rifle range are not the same at all. at 1/2 mile, the wind can change directions TWICE, not going to happen at 200 yds and less. also, mirage means very little at 100 yds, but it can easilly make you miss a man at 400 yds, much less at 1/2 mile.
 

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Hello!

Im just starting to shoot, I'm looking to buy a good rifle to shoot at long range, something easy because I'm a beginner but would still be good as I get better.
Not to worry about the price. Also something that looks pretty cool:p
Tailgunner gave it to you straight, learn to shoot and see if you really have the long range bug but don't start out with a serious dedicated long range rifle that you won't be able to take advantage of. My own dos centavos is to get a good target quality 22 rifle and do the 100 and 200 yard shooting till you get really good at it. Then move up to something like the .223, .243, ,270, etc. for extended ranges. I shot 1000 yard matches with a .308 but I was surrounded by guys shooting everything from .270's to 300 H&H Magnums. You really won't know what you like till you get some skills and shoot other peoples guns. Do not rush headlong into the sport, sort of ease into it a step at a time and enjoy the experience. Nobody is a one night wonder and you cannot buy bullseyes with gear.

If you just want cool buy an airsoft. Accurate guns have a beauty all their own that you will learn to appreciate and do not look like Buck Rogers specials.
 

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A .22 rifle is a great gun to practice long range shooting with and it is a lot cheaper than buying higher powered rifle ammo. At 100 and 200 yards you have significant windage and hold over considerations and the concepts are exactly the same as a higher power rifle would be. It is only the numbers themselves that are different.

Here is a photo of my .22 practice rifle. Its a Marlin 60 with a 3 x 9 scope and is moa at 100 yards with good ammo. This photo is a test I did at 200 yards to see if ole Swagger really could have made 200 yard shots with a .22 and done any good. I was not standing in a boat however, LOL. Even though I made the shots the energy the bullets arrived with is questionable if that would pop the apricot or not.


I also hav a thousand yard gun the details of which I don't plan to include here.
 

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Well, since you're saying that you're new to this, and looking for something that can grow with your skills....I'd recommend something in the Remington 700 line in .308 Winchester. The 700 series is one of the most ubitquitous bolt guns out there, comes in a variety of models from Remington (I have the 700 SPS Varmint model), and there is a HUGE selection of 3rd party parts and accessories out there. I would say spend your early money on the rifle, a decent scope, and ammunition. Once you build your skills, you can start looking at upgrades (stocks, triggers, etc.).

As was mentioned above, Savage offers a bunch of great rifles at a very reasonable price. When I was deciding what to buy, it came down to the Remington 700 SPS Varmint or the Savage Model 10 FP.

I agree with one of hte posters above....get out there and talk to the guys shooting what you like, and get their opinions, and if possible...try the individual rifles out to get a feel. Makes a big difference!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Tailgunner gave it to you straight, learn to shoot and see if you really have the long range bug but don't start out with a serious dedicated long range rifle that you won't be able to take advantage of. My own dos centavos is to get a good target quality 22 rifle and do the 100 and 200 yard shooting till you get really good at it. Then move up to something like the .223, .243, ,270, etc. for extended ranges. I shot 1000 yard matches with a .308 but I was surrounded by guys shooting everything from .270's to 300 H&H Magnums. You really won't know what you like till you get some skills and shoot other peoples guns. Do not rush headlong into the sport, sort of ease into it a step at a time and enjoy the experience. Nobody is a one night wonder and you cannot buy bullseyes with gear.

If you just want cool buy an airsoft. Accurate guns have a beauty all their own that you will learn to appreciate and do not look like Buck Rogers specials.
ok good advice! will start with a 22. and then move up to 22 250 that i herited from my grandfather, once i really start to do good and feel at ease with these il go buy a 308. , already have a smith and wesson M&P 15-22, would this be ok to start off with?
 

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ok good advice! will start with a 22. and then move up to 22 250 that i herited from my grandfather, once i really start to do good and feel at ease with these il go buy a 308. , already have a smith and wesson M&P 15-22, would this be ok to start off with?
It is an excellent start and after you master the 22 the 22-50 will take those skills and move them to a whole nother level. But hold off on the 22-50 for now because all it will do is cost you money, fun but not as effective as it will be after you become a sharp shooter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
It is an excellent start and after you master the 22 the 22-50 will take those skills and move them to a whole nother level. But hold off on the 22-50 for now because all it will do is cost you money, fun but not as effective as it will be after you become a sharp shooter.
Ok sounds good! will spend alot of time with the 22 :). any idea on how far I can move up to with the 22?
 

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Here's a late-coming suggestion on a rimfire.. you might want to try a 17hmr. They're more expensive to shoot than 22lr, but still way cheaper than any centerfire rifle. The rounds are manufactured to much tighter tolerances than 22lr, and can really put your shooting ability into perspective. 22lr you're looking at 100yds before bullet drop gets excessive, 17hmr will get you out to 165 or so. Cheap to shoot and will be a good round to learn trigger control, but it wont help much in the recoil department, because there isnt any...
 
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