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I've heard Jim speak to groups several times, and have had a couple of private conversations with him. He personally shot down over a dozen armed robbers, in Harlem, during the 1968 riot era. he double teamed another 1/2 dozen robbers with his partner, watched his partner shoot another 1/2 dozen, and heard directly from his fellow Stakeout cops about the other 15 or so shootouts at which he was not present.

The NYPD Stakeout unit intervened in over 280 armed robberies, mostly of liquor stores. Since the only place having enough frequency of robberies to justify having a pair of cops hiding out there was liquor stores in Harlem, every one of the robbers was Black. Guess how many they had to shoot, even tho they had them cornered and they were for sure going to do at least 10 years in one of the worst prisons in the US? 40. one in seven. Many of those would have fled or surrendered, if they had realized the score. But they'd turn at Jim's challenge, gun and hand, and Jim would start shooting.

As a civilian, if you leave the attacker(s) an "out", the odds are at least 5 to 1 that you won't have to shoot at all, and half of those who won't flee at just the sight of your gun will run once you start shooting, even if you miss. I've held men at gunpoint 4x, and none of them so much as took a step after they saw my gun. The NRA files show the same things, most of the time, you need not fire, IF you get the gun out and aligned on the attacker, in time for him to see it and stop. You can't shoot or intimidate anyone with a gun that he can't see, or that you haven't got "into play" yet. So speed of draw is a very high priority.

trainers are scared of lawsuits. beginners don't want to put in the airsoft and dryfire time necessary to be really in control of fast draw, so they de emphasize speed of draw in their classes, videos and books. but those same instructors have many hundreds of hours spent on fast draw practice. :)
 

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Good story was told about him, he shot an armed robber in a Pharmacy.

The shot person recovered, and was in the Court, and was asked to speak his piece after Jimmy had given his evidence.

He did not hear jimmy's evidence which basically said, "I gave my office, NYPD drop your weapon" The felons statement "I heard this voice say April fool M---Trucker" "and the lights went out" Not sure if this happened, but sounds right.
 

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From my studies of Jim Cirilllo and his CQB pistol gunfighting techniques I'm pretty sure that Cirillo didn't wait to draw; AND even went into, at least, several of his gunfights pistol-in-hand. One of the reasons, 'Why' Jim Cirillo didn't need to be a fast draw (and neither should you) is because he usually drew before the gunfight actually began.

Personally I consider Cirillo to be one of this nation's preeminent CQB pistol gunfighters; and, acting in a similar fashion, I once saved my own life. This said I have mixed emotions about his preference for revolvers; and, although I admit he would have known, I don't really know whether or not I agree with him about the ineffectiveness of shotguns in close quarter gun battles?

As for that Glock 19 the NYPD, 'brass' forced him to use towards the end of his career? Cirillo did as he was told; but he never stopped carrying, at least, one revolver as his backup. I, also, have mixed emotions about Cirillo's instinctive point-shooting method. It needs to be remembered that all of his engagements occurred at very close range. (Jim's method was to rush his opponents, gun-in-hand, and while already firing!) The need to use the sights, and to visually aim the gun really weren't paramount considerations for him.

I'm able to quite honestly say that a fast draw with your pistol is nowhere near as important as being ready and going for your weapon sooner rather than later. The other personal quality YOU MUST HAVE if you expect to survive in CQB is an utterly serious, totally committed attitude to take the other guy out, or die (happily) while you're trying.

You're right, by the way, Jim Cirillo's books are well worth reading!
 

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Whoa.

trainers are scared of lawsuits.
So true, when I first started my Training Company in Canada (1980) I was the only private contractor doing this. By 1982 I had risen to 500 students per year, my real big contract, had 400 employees, ATM and armored Vehicles, so it was easy.

The last two rounds of the twenty round test, step forward, 6 feet to target, and both rounds (S&W Revolvers) head shots. I was told by officialdom, if one of my Students used head shots, he/she would be charged with First Degree murder, and me, also, as an accessory! Police training changed in 2002?
 

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and what does your training have to do with superfast ccw draw, hmm? :) THAT'S what I meant about being scared of lawsuits.

Jim was a cop, NOTHING happened to him if he drew when it was NOT an incident. If YOU do so, , however, you will be sued, lose your carry permit and maybe even go to prison. There is no reason not to be superbly swift on the ccw draw, other than just being too lazy to work at it.
 
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