Perfect Union banner

1 - 20 of 47 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a new wood stock (part number of MS20401) from Midway and need to match the stain to a bare wood (dark walnut) handguard.
Do I use a neutral or a walnut stain?
Thanks
R/Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
897 Posts
James T. Kirk seems to be the stain master around here. I am sure he will chime in soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
957 Posts
I have a new wood stock (part number of MS20401) from Midway and need to match the stain to a bare wood (dark walnut) handguard.
Do I use a neutral or a walnut stain?
Thanks
R/Chris
Ruger Rifle Stock Assembly Wood Recoil Pad Liner Ruger Mini-14

the color i can see from this link looks like the gun stock color from Minwax. Minwax 1 gal. Oil-Based Gunstock Wood Finish 250 VOC Interior Stain-71088 - The Home Depot

Matching colors is never easy, it is best to strip them all down to the bare wood and stain them evenly with one type of color. But the least I can do is help you on a few color choices that I can see from the rifle stock on the midway link. Now giving me the benefit of the doubt, those rifle stocks are made of walnut, a gel stain gun stock color is used, and then spayed with a lacquer clear finish. So no store bought stain you get will be a true match, but we can get you close.

For testing:
using the under side of your hand guard, sand a smooth spot (200 grit paper) and apply stain so that you have a good idea if you are close to the shade on the rifle.

1. First try just straight Boiled Linseed Oil. Take a rag and dip into the oil and rub on. (do not boil it :) )
If the linseed oil is not close do not worry, linseed oil is not a sealant, just sand the spot for further testing.
2. Try Gun Stock stain color. Using a Wooster or Purdy White china brush, apply your sample evenly, keep brushing till all excess liquid has been brushed in. Now oil base stain is a sealant, so once you apply it and it does not match you will need to take some thinner and sand paper(200grit) and wet sand the colored spot.
3. If gun stock doesn't work try a combination of 1/2 cup boiled linseed oil with a table spoon Walnut stain color. Apply with a brush, and check for matching. if that doesn't work repeat the wet sanding method to get back down to bare wood.
4. Then try 1/2 cup of linseed oil with one table spoon dark walnut, apply with brush.

What we are trying to do here is start from the lightest shade first working your way darker till you hit the sweet spot. Once you have found your shade and ready to apply stain to the hand guard, I like to rub the wood down with 0000 steel wool and wipe down with a slightly damp thinner rag... let dry then apply.

Use the white china brush, perform nice even strokes all the way up and all the way down the hand guard. Keep up the even strokes till excess stain has been brushed in. Do not rub the stain in with a rag or it will lighten up, and you will end up rubbing off the true color of the stain.

and just to let you know, the small sample can of minwax stain is more than enough to do a whole stock. And boiled linseed oil never runs out, so make sure you get the smallest cans you can find... unless you plan on doing a lot of finish work.

Also these make for great clear coat finishes: Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane - Exterior Polyurethane Finish | Minwax

the spray cans will serve you just fine.
 

·
large member
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
I have a new wood stock (part number of MS20401) from Midway and need to match the stain to a bare wood (dark walnut) handguard.
Do I use a neutral or a walnut stain?
Thanks
R/Chris
james t seems to know his stuff. good advice.

i just got started refinishing a few projects, so take my advice as NOVICE.

1) i agree with jamest....if you want to match....sand both completely down and refinish both together. there still may be a very slight mismatch just cause all pieces of wood seem like they can have their own personality. but this will probably make the match very close.

2) you can test the stain, but unless its basically the exact same wood, expect a difference. imo, the store examples/tiles are pretty close in most instances.

3) use a PRE STAIN CONDITIONER. for some reason, i thought these may be "gimicky" when i started. they work VERY well, and make the wood accept the stain very evenly.

4) be sure to VERY lightly sand between coats of sealer/finish (like polyurethane) this will create a beautiful shine and keep the finish even.

btw, i am jealous! :lol: when i started my latest mini build, my first goal was to find a wood handguard, drill holes for ventilation, and stain HG and stock to match. ALAS, :eek: NOT TO BE! i could not find a wood hand guard at anything less than LUDICROUS prices. one bid over $120 on ebay! :eek: i ended up with a very cool steel hand guard i like a lot (even better than choate). but....i still think of what might have been.....:lol:
 

·
large member
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
i put my new mini tactical in an old wood stock, as it should be! :lol:

but, the stain on this stock was a mess imo. this pic shows it ok, but the stain covered 80% of the limited grain on the stock. it was "spotchy" and had many uneven parts that were various tones. nice stock, bad finish imo.
 

Attachments

·
Operation:Mindcrime
Joined
·
3,036 Posts
Sounds like Birch, it is known to be splotchy. Variable density.
 
  • Like
Reactions: hawkguy

·
large member
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
What is the best way? Strip and Stain or sand and stain?
R/S Novice.
the BEST way? maybe someone with more experience can answer that.

the way i did it.....i just sanded the original finish off, which was easier than i expected. i sanded down to final 600 ultra fine grit i believe. i used latex gloves on my last sanding to keep my greasy mitts off.

wiped it thoroughly clean....blew it clean w/ a compressor for good measure.
then applied PRE STAIN CONDITIONER, then STAIN, then POLY. not in one day mind you, there is a lot of dry time involved for most steps.

hope i helped a little. good luck!
 

·
large member
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
Sounds like Birch, it is known to be splotchy. Variable density.
ruger factory stocks are birch. not the prettiest wood, grain can be good, bad, and everything in between.

modern mini stocks are finished very well from what i have seen lately. they seem to be staining them much darker to make up for the birch. but these older ones were a crap shoot. some are REALLY bad. mine was pretty bad. the wood isn't the best, but i think many have proven they can look much better with a good job staining and finishing them.
 

·
Operation:Mindcrime
Joined
·
3,036 Posts
Pre-stain conditioner will reduce blotches in the finish, but it will also result in the wood not taking up as much stain. Just keep that in mind when you select a color. You could always go for a natural birch color, or even bleach it with peroxide and go for the "blonde" look. I wish I had some pictures handy, I did it on my Norinco SKS, and I gotta tell ya that was one hot Chinese Blonde!:D

Citrize (sp) is real nice. Doesnt eat stuff, or burn, and cleans up well with water. Takes a bit longer, but I prefer it to the toxic waste thats in other products.

If you are doing a wood handguard (cant member), you could do a few test spots on the inside.

Linseed or Tung oil is nice for a final cover, or for a bit more, I would recommend Deft spray lacquer (satin). Hit with 3-4 coats to seal, or 6-8 to really close things up. Follow dry times. Buff with fine steel wool. I strongly prefer Deft Laq to any poly in a can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
957 Posts
Hmm that stock looks really lite. Try rubbing straight Boiled Linseed oil first for sure.

Stripping!

Tools.
STRYPEEZE® - Homeowners - Sherwin-Williams
Shop Blue Hawk Stainless Steel Stripper Brush at Lowes.com
Shop 3M 20-Pack 150-Grit 9-in W x 11-in L Between Coats Finishing Sandpaper at Lowes.com
Shop 3M 20-Pack 220-Grit 9-in W x 11-in L Surface Smoothing Sandpaper at Lowes.com
Shop 3M 3M Pro-Pad Sanding Pad, 6 Pack, 2.8 In x 4 In x .5 In, Assorted Grit at Lowes.com

And get to work. I guess I should make a video of a strip job one day. But put some stripper in a plastic bucket and use a cheap old paint brush to apply it to the stock. Let the varnish bubble up, or till it looks foamy, and use the soft wire bush and 150grit sandpaper to scrub off the varnish. Keep applying, brushing, and sanding until the surface is no longer gummy. Now you are only half done, and I'll tell ya why not a lot of people want to be painters.:lol:

You get to take part in the wondrous endeavor of "SANDING"
Stripper only takes the clear coat off and what ever surface stain that is on the wood. It doesn't strip out stain that has been soaked in the pours of the wood. But lucky for you, there is not any checkering in that stock, so you can just sand away. Depending on how deep the color is will dictate how much sanding you must do. And if you want to stain it right you MUST sand it down back to bare wood. Old stain not sanded away will show through. If your good, you can faux a stock with the old stain, but that is another monster.

In short stripper is a faster way to get to the sanding process. start at 150grit making the wood bare, once you have done that move to 220grit to smooth her out. If you want to get really anal about it move to 400 grit to give it a nice slick feel. Hawkguy suggested a wood conditioner but I just use 0000 grit steel wool and rub the wood down and put a little paint thinner on a rag and wipe it down. Use rubber gloves for this process. then let the thinner in the wood fully evaporate.

after all that is done you will need some kind of stand for painting. I'll post a pic to help you get an idea.



And here are some pics of my work:










 
  • Like
Reactions: hawkguy

·
Operation:Mindcrime
Joined
·
3,036 Posts
I like the dark Mini stock, looks good. I have never been a fan of the lighter birch finish. Has no personality. Though it does not help that the wood grain is usually so plain also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
957 Posts
I like the dark Mini stock, looks good. I have never been a fan of the lighter birch finish. Has no personality. Though it does not help that the wood grain is usually so plain also.
Thats why I don't condition the wood. Thinner will get rid of most of the blotches, but it is the little imperfections that gives the stain character. In fact old stain not sanded in strategic places of the stock will give you a chance to make patters in the wood. If you are really good you could tiger stripe a wood stock. I'm still working on that.:rolleyes:
 
  • Like
Reactions: cwoods

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
JTK, You've done a nice job with your write up, and what I can only describe as a VERY nice job of re-finishing the stocks that you've pictured. I only wish I had the patience to re-finish a couple of my stocks, but I think you've pointed out the part that keeps me from attempting it, "SANDING" !!! I'm just afraid that I'll get too aggressive on some of the sharp corners and fillets and wind up with a real mess, so I just avoid the process. Good job, and keep up the good work.
 
1 - 20 of 47 Posts
Top