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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi everyone, I am new to this forum as of today, and I am looking foward to becomin part of the community here, as I am a new reloader, and could use all the help that I can get.

That having been said, I have resized some spent Winchester .308 brass, trimmed it down to meet case length specs, de-burred it, cleaned the primer pockets, and seated CCI Large Rifle primers in them, and I am now ready to add powder. At the recommendation of an employee at the store where I purchased my reloading equippment, I have a bottle of Hodgdon H4895 powder, and I intend to load the casings with Hornady 150gr SST bullets. I was hoping that someone here could give me max load data for this combination, as I cannot find it anywhere.

The bottle of powder I have lists a 45.5 gr charge fo use with Fed 210M primers, an 150 gr. Nos BT bullets, and that is the closest data that I have found to what I am looking for. Needles to say, I am hoping that someone here can provide me with more specific load data, taking into account my bullet and primer selection.

Additional Info: I intend to fire these from a Bushmater AR-10 platform rifle with a 16 in. barrel, as plinking ammo at targets ranging from 100-200 yds, and I am not very concerned with velocity, or pinpoint accuracy, but simply desire to load a round that will cycle the action and work smoothly in my rifle.

Thank you,
Michael Shanahan
 

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hostilenativelibertarian.
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Check out hodgdons online reloading data-just plug it in your search engine,they have data for hodgdons,imr powder and winchester powder,plus numerous bullet mfrs info!;)And you can print out or save any data they have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I actually have that .pdf open right now, unfotunately, the only 150 gr bullet they have listed a .308 load for is the same Nos. BT that appears on the front of my bottle. Now I'm new to this, so I may have missed it, butI don't think so. If you did happen to see something I missed, please do post it, but again, I didn't see what I was looking for on that particular document.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The closest load I have found so far is for the 150gr Nosler E-Tip, as it has a ballistic tip, composed of a proprietary polymer, covering a hollow cavity, like the Hornady SSTs I have, and the listed max load for that is 45.6 gr of Hodgdon H4895. Still, I am holding out hope that someone has access to a reloading manual with specific data for the bullets that I have, so that I can ensure that the safe and propper amount of powder is used in my reloads.
 

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While my (older) Hornady manual doesn't show that bullet, they do show there other 308/150gr bullets using from 38.7 to 41.8gr of that powder.
Note, looking at the velocities shown, that powder sucks hind tit for that bullet wt/cartridge combo. Go get some IMR 4064 or some Win 748. Hell, even IMR 3031 would be a better choice.
 

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WELCOME TO THE FORUM. Please look at.... (handloads.com) You will get great velocity with your H 4895.... Eventually... Try Varget....It goes with the .308; like peanut butter & chocolate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
As to the powder not being perfectly suited for this load, all I need is for it to fire. I'm new to this and I'm setting a few goals at a time. Right now, in order, they are as follows: I would like to build a round that doesn't create more pressure in the chamber than my rifle can handle, and also cycles the action reliably in my DGI-driven AR-10. In short, I don't need a barrel burner, or a tack driver just yet, so I figure this powder should do just fine for my plinking purposes. Judging by a consolidation of information I have collected (although still nothing on my specific bullet) I'm speculating that 40 grains would be a good place to start, given the max load for this powder and a similar bullet (Nosler E-Tip, 150gr) is 45.6 grains. Does that sound like a safe starting point to you all (14% below 45.6gr)? And do you think 40 will likely be enough to cycle my semi-auto?

Sorry to ask so much of you all, but I'm damned intent on getting this right the first time around, so I want to double and triple check with people like you who have been doing this for years before I move forward.
 

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hostilenativelibertarian.
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;)yup-40 looks like a good place to start!
 

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u don't start with max loads with any rd or gun, especially not a new reloading guy. You should load some minimal-medium loads, fire them, and see what's what. Then maybe max loads, but I wouldn't, not for a while yet, until you learn how to "work up" to the max, watching for signs of too much pressure.
 

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I agree with Donnel. Break in the barrel according to the recommendations of the maker. I would load some low loads. Do your research, you'll need your rifle over the long term so no need to break anything. My AR10 (which I sold) likes AA2520 and IMR4895. It didn't like Varget or IMR4064. All shooting 168 SMK bullets. Some rifles like different rounds than others. I think the instructions with mine said to clean the barrel every five rounds for the first so many.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I absolutely agree with Donnel, as well. If I didn't make it clear above, I am most certainly not going to be attempting ANY max load anytime soon. The recommended max for a comparable bullet to what I am using is listed at 45.6gr of Hodgdon H4895, and I'm only going to be loading 40 grains flat of that powder, a good 14 percent below the max load listed. That would be considered a medium load, wouldn't it? If not, and that is still a bit on the high side, then I welcome recommendations. I'm more than willing to use less powder, I just want to make sure that I have enough to cycle the weapon reliably.

So I guess what I'm saying is that I thought that 15% below max would be a good 'medium' load that would pose no harm to myself or my rifle, but if it would be safer for my rifle and I to start with less, I definitely want to do that. again, I'm striving for safety above all else, however, I just want to be as sure as I can be without actually test-firing the loads, that they will cycle the action of my AR-10. So IF 40gr of H4895 is not a good way to go like magnomark said it would be, then what would be? You all are the experts, I'm just here to learn from the pros.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Also, with regards to the comment on breaking in the barrel, I have already put 100 rounds of commercial ammunition through it, and I've cleaned it four times over that period (once every 25 rounds) so would I still have to worry about breaking it in by cleaning every five or ten rounds of reloaded ammunition? I sure hope not because I would imagine that the barrel has already been 'broken in' by now and shouldn't require such frequent and arduous cleaning. Again, I'm not going to be shooting anything smaller than a man-sized steel sillouette any further than 200 yards, so I don't need to achieve pinpoint accuracy with these rounds anyways, soas long as not cleaning my barrel save for every hundred rounds or so won't damage it, I don't see myself doing it. Once again, If I have to do it to protect the barrel or something, I will, but if not, I will just keep up a regiment of cleaning after every range trip, or every 100 rounds, whichever comes first.
 

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Excellent work MShanahan15. I have no doubt that you'll achieve your goal. I shoot my AR10 (which I sold) mostly at 200 yards. I like the way it shoots and I am able to get good accuracy out of it. I like shooting at a foot by foot square metal target at 200 years. Fun to hear it ding. Enjoy yours. As far as breaking it in, each maker usually has instructions on how to break them in. And they do vary at times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank you all so much for your support and advice. I'll begin charging up my primed cases momentarily, and I'll get out to the range tomorrow to see how they function in my rifle. I'll post back on here afterwards to let you all know, but thanks to all of the expertise that you have contributed, I am sure that everything will go smoothly, and I'll have a new, successful, and proven recipe for a .308 plinking load for my semi-auto by the end of tomorrow. Once again, your advice has proven invaluable and I hope to someday hold enough expertise in these matters to be able to help out a new reloader the way that you all helped me.
 

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I assume that your AR-10 is new and in good condition. I load the dHornady 150 SST bullet in my AR-10 using IMR-4895 and Federal 210 primers. I started out at 42.2 grains and stayed there. H-4895 would be worth loading if you live in extreme temp areas of the U.S.

FYI...there are service rifle purists that insist you should take it easy on developing loads for "service" rifles and I tend to lean toward this. However, there are cowboys out there that will tell you to load it up like you would a bolt action rifle. That's your decision. When I say service rifles I am referring to the M1A, Garand (.308 Win), FNFAL, etc. Is your AR-10 a service rifle? Two world's of thought. Incidentally, the cleaning burning powder that you can use the better for the AR platform rifles due to the "Direct Impingement" gas operating systems. I rarely shoot more than 40 rounds when I go to the range, so I haven't had any difficulties with jams or stovepipes occurring. Hope some of the info will help you or at least get you off in the right direction.
 

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I tend to stay on the lower end of the loading date with IMR4895 but I use 168 SMK's. Works well with an AR10 or a Remington 700.
 

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Hornady 9th edition handbook lists load data for the 150grain SST bullet #30302 with
H4895 powder as follows: Starting load 37.2 grains - Maximum load 44.0 grains. Hope this helps.
 

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With a new bullet I like to start with a minimum powder load and press out 5 rounds and increase the powder by .2 grains and press out 5 more, etc. until I get 100 rounds or to the max powder load. Take everything to the range and see what works best. Documentation and verification of the powder loads is essential.
 

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I may have missed it, but what reloading manual are you using? Taking one load off a powder jug is not good reloading "sense". A powder company's website is fine but far from optimal. I'd suggest A "generic" manual like Lyman's 49th Edition, and one manual from the manufacturer of the bullets you intend to use, and another from the powder manufacturer. Compare loads between the three and start with the starting loads and you will be able to produce safe, accurate ammo. Most reloaders I know have several manuals.

FWIW; I don't have different methods for "plinking only" loads. I do the best I can with every round I load as if my life depended on it. All my reloads are made to my best quality standards whether the intended target is a beer can or that trophy elk...
 

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Don't worry too much about the brand of bullets, I have been loading long enough to know that most older manuals would just give loads by bullet weight.
I would be very careful when loading some of the newer solid copper bullets, because they have long shanks and copper is not as soft as lead. As others have said do not use max loads as starting loads, and if you are using military brass I would check the weight against comparable commercial brass, some times mil. surplus is thicker and therefore has less capacity thereby you need less powder to get the same velocity.
A case in point, I loaded some lake city .223 and some PPU brass with the exact same powder and bullet, I then chronographed the loads and found that the PPU brass gave higher velocity and flattened primers, the lake city looked normal, these were loaded at the lowest load in my Lyman manual for H335 powder.
Chronographs are not very expensive and can keep you out of trouble.
 
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