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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What can anyone tell me about the firing sequence on the Mini 14?

What I'm interested to know is, is the bullet out of the tube when the operating rod slams fully open or is it still traveling down the pipe?

I'm trying to understand the 'GAS Buffer' or 'Recoil Buffer' or whatever it is that a lot of folks are installing.

Does it work on the peak backward movement of the operating rod or cushion the blow when the operating rod is slamming a round back into the chamber?

Or is there buffers for both actions that may be confusing me?

BTW: Installed a better front sight and Muzzle break and dropped an inch from my groupings. Still need to drop another 1 1/2 from my techniques, and an 1" from the gun before I get to the limits of the ammo.
 

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Sgt if you will follow in your Mini Manual, maby we can go thru this together. Pages 32 - 37. I will use the proper Ruger names:

(1) Buffer Bushing= Holds the Buffer Guide Rod, and absorbs the recoil shock from the Slide Assy. rearward travel.
(2) Buffer, Guide Rod= Holds receiver end of the Slide/Recoil spring.
(3) Gas Port Bushing= This is common to the barrel, and lower gasblock. It controls the amount of gas allowed into the Gas Pipe, and into the Slide Assembly to cock your mini.
(4) Slide Assembly= most of us call it an opp-rod

About 70% of the mini's felt recoil is caused by the (4) Slide Assembly slaming into the (1) Buffer Bushing. Pull your mini apart, and see for your self manually.

We can reduce This recoil 2 ways. (A) by installing Mike Knifongs Gas Port Bushing Kit (3 different size orfices to suit our ammo, and mini) we can drasticly reduce the amout of gas which blows the (4) Slide Assembly rearward., (B) And adding a rubber (Recoil buffer/ Shok buffer) between the (1) Buffer Bushing, and the (4) Slide Assembly. Instead of metal to metal, its metal to ruber.

I find my muzzle brake seems to reduce muzzle flip more than felt recoil.

If you do the above 2 mods on your mini, you will have about 70% less recoil. Mine kicks a little more than a 10/22. maby like a .22 mag. I hope this help clear things up.

I believe the bullet is out of the barrel before the Slide Assy, is all the way Aft.
 

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As to the relationship between the bullet exiting the barrel & the cycling of the operating rod goes I'm sure the bullet is well out of the barrel before the oprod begins it's travel. Remember the .223 is moving at around 3000 feet per second & the distance between the gas port & the muzzle is about 7". At this speed the bullet travels 1' in 1/3000th's of a second! You can nearly cut that in half to 1/6000th's of a second between the time the gas port sees gas pressure & the time the bullet exits the barrel. I would be willing to bet that if you set up high speed camera you'd find that a foot out of the muzzle the oprod hasn't even begun to move yet. On the other hand actual recoil begins when the powder is ingnited by the primer & the bullet leaves the carteridge case mouth.

Just my 2¢
Bushwack
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It sounds like the actual recoil, no matter how hard, and even if it were to knock you out of your shoes, couldn't effect the path of the bullet you just fired....

I suppose though that if one were anticipating recoil and tensing up or flinching ''as you were firing'' that 'recoil' , by our pre-reaction to it. Could have an adverse effect on bullet flight.

So in all actuallity the recoil you feel on the first shot deviates the second and subsequent shots, but technically not the first...????
 

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No, the recoil begins as soon as the bullet starts moving out of the mouth of the cartridge. Remember that guy Newton. "For every action there is an equal & opposite reaction." The point I'm making is that the cycling of the action has no effect upon the bullet as it occurs after the bullet has already exited the barrel. As you say though flinching & bad technique will effect the POI as would barrel harmonics & probably a dozen other mechanical things. The violent cycling of the action will effect your ability to get your sights back on the target quickly. As designed the operating rod receives much more gas volume than is needed to cycle the action. Using one of Mike Knifong's smaller gas bushings will restrict the volume of gas reaching the operating rod resulting in a reduced slamming of the oprod into the receiver. It may slow down the cyclic rate of fire some but not that we'd notice.

Good shooting
Bushwack
 

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Hey Cajungeo and Bushwack,

Once again, I've learned something new on the forum. Thanks for sharing the info on the aftermarket gas bushings. Now, do you have a web-site or phone number for a vendor who sells these "Mike Knifong" gas bushings. They sound very interesting.
:usa:
 

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shy-guy----Use the "Search" tab at the top of the page & search for Mike's name or just gas bushings to read more. As far as I know Mike doesn't have a web site yet but you can email or call him.

Good shooting
Bushwack
 

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If you send mike your trigger group, and another $25 he will do a trigger job for ya. Its a combo deal. I worked for me. :D

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