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Greetings All!
I'm a new member and have really enjoyed the posts from everyone. It has given me many great ideas for the SS/SYN Ranch .223 I have coming later this week.
Here is my question, besides putting a flash hider (like a Choate) on the weapon, has anyone tried Firelapping? Thats where different grit polishes from coarse to very fine are used to coat a bullet and then fire them thru the gun? According to the articles I've read it can shrink groups by as much as half. Instead of buying expensive premade kits, has anyone tried simply rolling your own so to speak buy dipping bullets in jewelers rouge?

Thanks, Keith
 

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It is generally accepted that firelapping is used for:

1) Trying to fix long damaged, pitted bores like on C&R rifles

or

2) as an esoteric technique to squeeze a miniscule amount of accuracy out of an already accurized system.

A mini-14 is neither... it won't help you at all, and you'll simply add premature wear to the barrel.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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Firelapping is used to help smooth out FACTORY barrels which are cheaply made like on Remingtons and Rugers. These are hammer forged which have a tremendous amount of chatter marks and rough spots which can distort bullet jacket material and cause excessive copper and carbon buildup.

Firelapping can help this by smoothing out the rough edges as long as you do very little. Doing too much will wear a barrel prematurely.

You can experiment with it, use only the finest grits and follow directions but I think you will not see much increase in accuracy though copper buildup might not be as bad after this treatment.

http://www.geocities.com/westcustomgunsmithing
 

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Originally posted by Tony @ WCG
Firelapping is used to help smooth out FACTORY barrels which are cheaply made like on Remingtons and Rugers. These are hammer forged which have a tremendous amount of chatter marks and rough spots which can distort bullet jacket material and cause excessive copper and carbon buildup.
While my opinion differs from yours, I'll accept it because it, sort of. follows the line of cleaning up pitted C&R barrels.

I still maintain, however, that skinny little barrels that have gobs of run-out, like the Mini-14, are going to be accurate by luck and finding the right load.

BUT, that being said, if a rifle shoots poorly, changing ANYTHING might help. Barrel whip and out-of-true barrels are the Mini-14's problem. Changing any variable might help the combination.

The funny thing is that muzzle brakes do some good by adding mass to the end of the barrel. The brake effect does nothing, but slinging on some mass does a lot of good. But people confuse adding mass and changing the ringing characteristics of the barrel with the brake effects.

Thanks for posting. Sometimes I speak as if what I ~think~ is gospel, and it is not.

:rolleyes:
 

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I agree with the excessive runout that these barrels have and also Ruger is known all thruout the industry as making the worse barrel on any rifle out there among the big companies, whether it is a Mini, 77, No.1 or whatever...they are mass produced as cheap as possible unlike years ago when Ruger "purchased" their barrels (used quality button rifled blanks but still were poorly turned down by Ruger).

Yeah, I know the C&R guys play with firelapping but it was developed to help smooth out factory rifle barrels originally for the average guy. Most factory barrels are made fast and cheap and actually are very rough in the interior compared to aftermarked barrels.

With the thin mini barrels, playing with muzzle attachments is a way of dampening the harmonics to a small degree, kinda like the "Boss" on a Winchester or Browning rifle idea, an old idea but it does work. There are also companies that sleeve the mini barrels toward the muzzle end, again it dampens the harmonics to a degree but I think it is too much money to put into a factory barrel. I personally wouldn't put a ton of money into a factory Ruger barrel trying to make it shoot well but these inexpensive barrel "dampeners" (brakes) are a good idea to try.

If it were me trying to make a mini shoot, I would first try: Glass bedding, trigger job, hand loads, fire lapping (a little bit is all) and some sort of muzzle attachment...oh, and a new muzzle crowning. And...with the factory barrel, you can play with "pressure bedding" the mini, like an M14 or M1 Garand, this helps reduce harmonics too. The above things are little $ outlay and can help, maybe getting the accuracy the shooter is pleased with.

Hope this helps, Tony

http://www.geocities.com/westcustomgunsmithing
 

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Don't do anything Keith until you shoot your Mini. Mine is SS with the synthetic stock and I was absolutely amazed at the groups with factory ammo and Nikon scope.
 
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