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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mosin Nagant, 1933 Izhevsk hex receiver. Re-arsenaled with a laminate stock post-war as far as I can tell. Not that its anything new, but these are just cool, and so cheap. $145 out the door. Wish everything was this cheap. For $145 I could've bought .. well not much as cool as a mint (arsenal) condition 7.62x54mmR cannon :)









 

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Very nice. I hope to be picking up a couple that will hopefully be in as good a condition as that one. I am still regretting not picking up a crate of SKS's when they were selling for 69 and 79 dollars back in 95! Dont wanna miss the boat on a bargin like these rifles again. Besides they have some nastolga factor about them too and that would be nice for an addition to the gun cabinet.
 

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Now you have "dun went and dun it"--hooked for good--lol. They are addictive. I just like the old warhorses and the cheap shooting doesn't hurt either. Have been scrounging boxer brass for them. If you reload then slug each bore to make sure of their sizes. Will help with their accuracy.
 

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This will not be your last. My first Russian mil-surp rifle was an SKS. I only bought it because it was inexpensive (relatively speaking), and because I already had a Ruger Mini-30 that fired the same round. It was instant love. I moved on to Mosin Nagants, and eventually to the Kalashnikov family of rifles as well. There is everything to love, and nothing NOT to love. Enjoy. And stock up on 7.62x54R spam can milsurp ammo while you can. The Enflield .303 British rifles are marvelous, but he milsurp ammo dried up long ago, and all that you can find for them is 75-80 cent/round ammo. Don't let it happen to you. Stock up NOW. The best prices I know currently are from Sportsman's Guide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys.. I can see how its going to be addicting. I'm waiting on head space gauges in the mail so I haven't shot it yet, but I've already been thinking of another one. The cheap price, interesting history, and cool appearance in an ugly sort of way are hard to resist.
 

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Headspace? I have never bothered to check head space in any of my Mosin Nagants (though I am NOT saying it isn't a good idea; it IS with ANY rifle). But since you raise the question, I want to take a moment to point out something you DO need to check, and that is the protrusion of your firing pin. Did you receive the tear drop shaped tool with four notches in it? This is an all purpose Mosin Nagant takedown tool that serves as a screwdriver, pin removal tool, and also as a go/no-go gauge for your pin. The two INNERMOST notches are your GO and NO-GO gauges for your pin.

THIS is the tool:



Meanwhile, ENJOY THIS:

Mosin Nagant Humour (Mosin vs AR-15 vs AK47
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Already checked the firing pin with the tool, good to go! I took it down tonight and all is well with the receiver and barrel..

Loved the link, hilarious!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Headspace passed with flying colors.. The Okie gauges ( Okie Headspace Gauges ) were very easy to use and came in the mail within a few days. Highly recommended for anyone with a rimmed vintage rifle. I'll be bringing these along with the firing pin tool and bore light to all future purchases.
 

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Okay, okay, so SHOOT the damned thing already and tell us what you think. We've all been sitting on pins and needles waiting. We can't STAND the suspense a moment longer. :rolleyes:

Oh, and by the way, your photos are BEAUTIFUL and of amazing quality. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Just got back from the first range trip!

Despite checking the headspace, firing pin depth, and the receiver/barrel/bolt, I still did the 'hold my head to the side' first shot :lol:

I was shooting Silver Bear 174gr FMJs and Tula 148gr FMJs, and it ran like a top. The range had both in stock for ~$10/20 so that's a bonus. The action was a bit sticky at first but it freed up as I shot.

The sights need some getting used to, I was shooting about 6" high at 50yds off the bench, then was trying some hold-under. Seemed hard to get an accurate sight picture. My best 5 round group was probably around 3", with a few touching among that. I wouldn't say that was the rifles fault. The trigger was pretty good, considering. Very smooth, but creepy, but when it did break it was clean. Shot 25 rounds and I'm a tad sore. Recoil really wasn't that bad, but felt more 30-06ish due to the metal buttplate. My fleece and two shirts wasn't quite enough padding, and shooting from the bench didnt help. When I was switching off to my Mini-14 it seemed like I was shooting a loud, muzzle-flashy 22lr in comparison :lol:

I was doubled up on ear protection (indoor range), but I think my arrival hastened the departure of some of the pistol guys next to me who only had foam plugs in. When I switched to the Mini it wasn't nearly as loud as I'd remembered it :lol:

Cases all looked good, no splits or pierced primers, can't wait to go back!
 

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Just got back from the first range trip!

:lol:

I was doubled up on ear protection (indoor range), but I think my arrival hastened the departure of some of the pistol guys next to me who only had foam plugs in. When I switched to the Mini it wasn't nearly as loud as I'd remembered it :lol:

Cases all looked good, no splits or pierced primers, can't wait to go back!
YAY!!! Now you see how much FUN the Mosin is and why we all love it so? I shoot mine on a piece of land about an hour from here. I have a total of 72 acres, mostly steep hillside. But there is a large field at the bottom, and it is large enough that it isn't difficult to shoot as far as I can reasonably see a sheet of paper, which is around 120 yds. In fact, it would be possible to shoot as far as 300 yds across that field. I most commonly shoot around 80 yds. And I have been known to shoot my 91/30's without ear protection for brief periods. It's fun to be able to do in the wide open spaces like that, shooting into a hillside. I have put a few rounds through a 16" hard maple, so I respect the power of the thing. I think nothing of firing off 60 rounds or so in an afternoon. Great fun. I plan to go deer hunting this weekend with "Rasputin", a particularly accurate M91/30. If I get tired of carrying him around after day 1, I'll have an SKS for backup, but Rasputin is more accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
That's awesome, I have some friends who have land south of where I'm at in western NY and get to go out there once in a while. I love being able to shoot with lightly-in foam only plugs outdoors and hearing the echoes through the woods and into the hills. Shooting indoors at the range with tight foams and muffs is the only way to handle the loud stuff, and once I come out of there and take em out/off I feel like I just came up from underwater..

I was sold on the Mosin once I shot a friends a few times and had to have my own. I must say though I had been looking at the hotter Prvi Partizan brass ammo, and while I'll probably still get some I think I'll pass on it for target shooting. That metal buttplate isn't too friendly for getting your rounds in an hour range session (the indoor 50yd place is my best option within half an hour drive).

How do you use your sights? Still stock? Post centered in rear groove with bulls on top was resulting in me being real high at 50. I know they shoot high but it was a lot high. My front post also has a bit of a nail-head on top of it from the arsenal so its hard to be too precise with it. Any suggestions? I know about raising it up with some heat shrink but that seems like while it would fix the elevation it would be worse from a windage standpoint...
 

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Wow, I'm quite surprised that ANY indoor range will allow you to shoot the MN. I don't know of one anywhere near here that would allow it. A friend of mine in northern KY goes to an outdoor 100 yd public range at a WMA (wildlife management area). The disadvantage there is having to shoot through long steel tubes.

Not all MN's shoot high, but I did run into that with one that I was fixing up to give to a friend. I used a small piece of the plastic coating from 12 gauge housing wire, and slipped it over the front sight post. I used the white plastic from the ground wire. That way, it was easy to paint it a bright color with a bit of nail polish, and also seal the hole that it leaves at the top. It worked quite well, and does't appear to have hurt the horizontal accuracy.

My eyesight isn't what it once was and I must wear corrective lenses for distance. Fortunately, I now have a lens that more easily allows me to focus on both near and far objects at the same time. Still, it's tricky seeing the rear sight clearly. I do my best to get a sight picture of the front post centered in the slit in my rear sight, with the tops of the post and rear sight aligned horizontally, as with any gun. And that point is my point of aim. It's tricky, because I am usually shooting at a standard piece of paper, which is nearly hidden by the sights themselves. I have had some fun with Rasputin, shooting balloons around 9" in diameter at 120 yds. He picks 'em off pretty well. I cannot comfortably shoot prone, so I usually shoot squatting, and with my left elbow on my knee, or standing.

I am small enough in stature that I am frequently asked (here in Kentucky) if I were ever a jockey. I actually would be pretty big for a jockey, but at 5'2" and around 125#, I get the question. Also, I'll be 62 this month. The only rifle that has ever bruised me was a friend's lever action Marlin 30-30. I hope never to shoot that gun again. Even with the steel butt plates, the Mosin's don't bother me, even in summer clothing. You might want to look into the butt pads that they make for the MN, particularly if you desire a longer length of pull (which I do NOT). The weight of the MN seems to help greatly in absorbing the recoil. They are a magnificent rifle. I have a fleet of them, to be honest, and I just adore them.

If you like scopes, there are a few different ways to go. We can discuss that later. There is one option I would avoid. There is a type of weaver rail that goes on the rear sight, pinning in where the rear sight leaf pins, and then using screws to make a rocker type adjustment. These are not good. Not tight enough. But there are other options that DO work. Also, one CAN get a reproduction of the PU sniper scope, and a bolt with bent handle. Such bolts run around $75. I recently bought a Mosin in this configuration. Haven't shot it yet. It ran me $525 out the door. Centerfire Systems has the Chinese repro of the PU scope for $150. This, of course, would mean tapping the receiver and cutting away some of the stock alongside the receiver in order to fit the scope mount.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for the insights, I think I definitely need some more practice with it as-is.

My local indoor range is pretty new and have some nice electric ranged target carriers and allow anything except 50bmg or steel core ammo.
 

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My local indoor range is pretty new and have some nice electric ranged target carriers and allow anything except 50bmg or steel core ammo.
Wow!!! :rapid:

One nice feature about the side-mounted PU scope is that it will leave your original iron sights available to you. I'll include a photo here that includes my sniper.

Also, get a load of these kids:

Nine Year Old Shooting M44 Mosin Nagant

Eight year old shooting Mosin first time

Shootin' watermelon

So, is the Mosin Nagant accurate?

In these photos: Rasputin, Vassily & Vanki



 

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Very nice collection you have there! Is that an original sniper? I think I want a m38 or m44 next..
I'm very certain that the sniper is NOT an original sniper. No. But for that price, I'm not complaining. The bottom one is a 1940 Tula Finnish capture with a bent bolt handle. I have two M44's. They're fun. I do not have an M38. I DO have a Finnish M39 and I have an M91/59 (carbines that were made from 91/30's and look like M38's). M38's are difficult to find, my friend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Do you have pictures of the Finnish m39? Does it have the pistol grip/fat forend stock? I love those. There was a m38 at the gun show I bought my 91/30 at, but it was zip-tied up to a pegboard and they were asking $325. I figured I'd be in trouble if I came home with two so I didn't ask to check it out, besides I didn't know enough about the m38s to try to bargain with the guy...
 
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