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The barrel is original to the gun and no work has ever been done to it, except a trigger polish job. I bought the gun brand new in a box from an official Ruger dealer. And yes, I took the flash hider off and replaced it with a thread protector. I didn't really need a flash hider for hunting roe deer. By the time the deer has the opportunity to see the muzzle flash, it would probably already be too late for the poor fellow.

The gun sits in its original synthetic stock. I have tried both a Hogue overmold and an original wood stock, but eventually came back to the original one. I didn't notice any big difference in accuracy from one stock to another, but then again I haven't tested this exentsively. Can poor bedding cause accuracy problems of this scale?

I use both factory and handloaded ammo. The handloads seem to group a tad better, but nothing huge, and certainly not enough to solve the problem. When the groups are 10-12 MOA, shrinking them by 2 MOA doesn't really do much good.

Factory ammo I have tested is, among others, American Eagle 55 gr FMJ, Winchester 55 and 62 gr FMJ, GGG 55 gr FMJ, GGG with 69 gr SMK bullets, PMC 55 gr FMJ. With handloads I have been using Nosler RDF 70 gr and PPU 62 gr FMJ bullets with different loads and lengths. With the Nosler RDF's, I think I can see a slight improvement in the groups, but still around 10 MOA.

I have ordered a brand new walnut stock which should be here shortly, I will take the gun back to the range when I get this.

I also have the impression that the gun is more accurate when fired offhand. My groups are just as good, and some times better, when firing offhand from a kneeling position (which is my favourite shooting position), instead of using a sandbag shooting rest. With all my other guns it's of course the other way around. So the thought did occur to me, that the gun doesn't like being rested on a sandbag, but it just seemed a bit far fetched.
do you notice any difference in grouping with a cold barrel? take 1 shot wait till it cools cold and then another, compared to a warm or hot barrel..after multiple fast shots??
 

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Discussion Starter #22
do you notice any difference in grouping with a cold barrel? take 1 shot wait till it cools cold and then another, compared to a warm or hot barrel..after multiple fast shots??
I'll do some more testing with this, as soon as I get my new stock, probably next week. In the mean time, I'm going to check if I can smooth out some of the sharp edges in the BREECH :). I like things running smooth in any case, and will follow @RIBob 's advise on this matter. Gently chamfering sharp edges in this area shouldn't really hurt anything.

I'm also going to check if the bullets are being damaged when chambered. When firing a group of five shots, two of them feed from one side, and three from the other. With some luck, it's as simple as that - the two out of the five rounds that feed from the opposite side will more often be scratched/damaged. Or vice versa. Could also be the mag, will try another one.

I really appreciate all this feedback, it opens up thoughts I haven't been able to come up with by myself.
 

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The barrel is original to the gun and no work has ever been done to it, except a trigger polish job. I bought the gun brand new in a box from an official Ruger dealer. And yes, I took the flash hider off and replaced it with a thread protector. I didn't really need a flash hider for hunting roe deer. By the time the deer has the opportunity to see the muzzle flash, it would probably already be too late for the poor fellow.

The gun sits in its original synthetic stock. I have tried both a Hogue overmold and an original wood stock, but eventually came back to the original one. I didn't notice any big difference in accuracy from one stock to another, but then again I haven't tested this exentsively. Can poor bedding cause accuracy problems of this scale?

I use both factory and handloaded ammo. The handloads seem to group a tad better, but nothing huge, and certainly not enough to solve the problem. When the groups are 10-12 MOA, shrinking them by 2 MOA doesn't really do much good.

Factory ammo I have tested is, among others, American Eagle 55 gr FMJ, Winchester 55 and 62 gr FMJ, GGG 55 gr FMJ, GGG with 69 gr SMK bullets, PMC 55 gr FMJ. With handloads I have been using Nosler RDF 70 gr and PPU 62 gr FMJ bullets with different loads and lengths. With the Nosler RDF's, I think I can see a slight improvement in the groups, but still around 10 MOA.

I have ordered a brand new walnut stock which should be here shortly, I will take the gun back to the range when I get this.

I also have the impression that the gun is more accurate when fired offhand. My groups are just as good, and some times better, when firing offhand from a kneeling position (which is my favourite shooting position), instead of using a sandbag shooting rest. With all my other guns it's of course the other way around. So the thought did occur to me, that the gun doesn't like being rested on a sandbag, but it just seemed a bit far fetched.
Hello Fleske
You really need to bed your stock. It doesn't make any difference which stock you have on it but bedding adds to the stability of the action in the stock. With your synthetic stock you can bed it with small pieces of credit cards. Put them along the inside of the stock where the receiver meets up to the stock. This keeps the action from floating around inside of the stock as you shoot.

With the wood Stocks you can use epoxy. I use J-B Weld but several companies make products specifically for bedding actions to stocks. J-B Weld does not stick to synthetic stocks but does stick to your metal parts. You do not want the metal parts permanently stuck to your stock with epoxy. This requires something to keep that from happening, like wax or polish. Go to Youtube and watch some videos about bedding actions in wood stocks.

The more you take your action into and out of your stock the more flyers you are going to have. Once the action is in the stock don't take it out unless absolutely necessary. I clean mine once a year but mine are stainless. It's called harmonic settling. This alone I'm sure adds to the number of flyers you are getting.

The last thing I do as a common practice is when I load my Mini, I pull the op rod handle all the way to the rear and let it hammer forward seating the round in the chamber. This is not the time to ride the handle forward and be nice to it. Pull it all the way to the rear and let it go.

I hope this helps
kwg
 
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