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The barrel is original to the gun and no work has ever been done to it, except a trigger polish job. I bought the gun brand new in a box from an official Ruger dealer. And yes, I took the flash hider off and replaced it with a thread protector. I didn't really need a flash hider for hunting roe deer. By the time the deer has the opportunity to see the muzzle flash, it would probably already be too late for the poor fellow.

The gun sits in its original synthetic stock. I have tried both a Hogue overmold and an original wood stock, but eventually came back to the original one. I didn't notice any big difference in accuracy from one stock to another, but then again I haven't tested this exentsively. Can poor bedding cause accuracy problems of this scale?

I use both factory and handloaded ammo. The handloads seem to group a tad better, but nothing huge, and certainly not enough to solve the problem. When the groups are 10-12 MOA, shrinking them by 2 MOA doesn't really do much good.

Factory ammo I have tested is, among others, American Eagle 55 gr FMJ, Winchester 55 and 62 gr FMJ, GGG 55 gr FMJ, GGG with 69 gr SMK bullets, PMC 55 gr FMJ. With handloads I have been using Nosler RDF 70 gr and PPU 62 gr FMJ bullets with different loads and lengths. With the Nosler RDF's, I think I can see a slight improvement in the groups, but still around 10 MOA.

I have ordered a brand new walnut stock which should be here shortly, I will take the gun back to the range when I get this.

I also have the impression that the gun is more accurate when fired offhand. My groups are just as good, and some times better, when firing offhand from a kneeling position (which is my favourite shooting position), instead of using a sandbag shooting rest. With all my other guns it's of course the other way around. So the thought did occur to me, that the gun doesn't like being rested on a sandbag, but it just seemed a bit far fetched.
do you notice any difference in grouping with a cold barrel? take 1 shot wait till it cools cold and then another, compared to a warm or hot barrel..after multiple fast shots??
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
do you notice any difference in grouping with a cold barrel? take 1 shot wait till it cools cold and then another, compared to a warm or hot barrel..after multiple fast shots??
I'll do some more testing with this, as soon as I get my new stock, probably next week. In the mean time, I'm going to check if I can smooth out some of the sharp edges in the BREECH :). I like things running smooth in any case, and will follow @RIBob 's advise on this matter. Gently chamfering sharp edges in this area shouldn't really hurt anything.

I'm also going to check if the bullets are being damaged when chambered. When firing a group of five shots, two of them feed from one side, and three from the other. With some luck, it's as simple as that - the two out of the five rounds that feed from the opposite side will more often be scratched/damaged. Or vice versa. Could also be the mag, will try another one.

I really appreciate all this feedback, it opens up thoughts I haven't been able to come up with by myself.
 

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The barrel is original to the gun and no work has ever been done to it, except a trigger polish job. I bought the gun brand new in a box from an official Ruger dealer. And yes, I took the flash hider off and replaced it with a thread protector. I didn't really need a flash hider for hunting roe deer. By the time the deer has the opportunity to see the muzzle flash, it would probably already be too late for the poor fellow.

The gun sits in its original synthetic stock. I have tried both a Hogue overmold and an original wood stock, but eventually came back to the original one. I didn't notice any big difference in accuracy from one stock to another, but then again I haven't tested this exentsively. Can poor bedding cause accuracy problems of this scale?

I use both factory and handloaded ammo. The handloads seem to group a tad better, but nothing huge, and certainly not enough to solve the problem. When the groups are 10-12 MOA, shrinking them by 2 MOA doesn't really do much good.

Factory ammo I have tested is, among others, American Eagle 55 gr FMJ, Winchester 55 and 62 gr FMJ, GGG 55 gr FMJ, GGG with 69 gr SMK bullets, PMC 55 gr FMJ. With handloads I have been using Nosler RDF 70 gr and PPU 62 gr FMJ bullets with different loads and lengths. With the Nosler RDF's, I think I can see a slight improvement in the groups, but still around 10 MOA.

I have ordered a brand new walnut stock which should be here shortly, I will take the gun back to the range when I get this.

I also have the impression that the gun is more accurate when fired offhand. My groups are just as good, and some times better, when firing offhand from a kneeling position (which is my favourite shooting position), instead of using a sandbag shooting rest. With all my other guns it's of course the other way around. So the thought did occur to me, that the gun doesn't like being rested on a sandbag, but it just seemed a bit far fetched.
Hello Fleske
You really need to bed your stock. It doesn't make any difference which stock you have on it but bedding adds to the stability of the action in the stock. With your synthetic stock you can bed it with small pieces of credit cards. Put them along the inside of the stock where the receiver meets up to the stock. This keeps the action from floating around inside of the stock as you shoot.

With the wood Stocks you can use epoxy. I use J-B Weld but several companies make products specifically for bedding actions to stocks. J-B Weld does not stick to synthetic stocks but does stick to your metal parts. You do not want the metal parts permanently stuck to your stock with epoxy. This requires something to keep that from happening, like wax or polish. Go to Youtube and watch some videos about bedding actions in wood stocks.

The more you take your action into and out of your stock the more flyers you are going to have. Once the action is in the stock don't take it out unless absolutely necessary. I clean mine once a year but mine are stainless. It's called harmonic settling. This alone I'm sure adds to the number of flyers you are getting.

The last thing I do as a common practice is when I load my Mini, I pull the op rod handle all the way to the rear and let it hammer forward seating the round in the chamber. This is not the time to ride the handle forward and be nice to it. Pull it all the way to the rear and let it go.

I hope this helps
kwg
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Ok, so I tried to feed one round at a time without even feeding from the mag, to rule out the possibility of the rounds getting damaged during feeding. Same results - 10-12 MOA groups at 50 yards.

I have ordered a 9/64 hex bit that fits my torque wrench, will try to properly torque the gas block. But I haven't seen any reports of a badly torqued gas block resulting in this poor accuracy.

The new walnut stock fits really tight compared to the old one. So I'll give that a chance as well, as I haven't been to the range since I got it.
 

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Ok, so I tried to feed one round at a time without even feeding from the mag, to rule out the possibility of the rounds getting damaged during feeding. Same results - 10-12 MOA groups at 50 yards.

I have ordered a 9/64 hex bit that fits my torque wrench, will try to properly torque the gas block. But I haven't seen any reports of a badly torqued gas block resulting in this poor accuracy.

The new walnut stock fits really tight compared to the old one. So I'll give that a chance as well, as I haven't been to the range since I got it.
I would skip the one at a time loading. DON'T DO IT. I like to load 4 rounds. Pull the op rod all the way to the rear and let it go slamming a round into the chamber. Just like it would do if you were shooting it. Shoot the 4 rounds. Check for flyers. Don't remove your rifle from the stock to clean it after every range session. Spray out the chamber with some spray brake cleaner or fuel injector cleaner. It dies fast. It's 99% alcohol. I pull a bore snake through at this time to make sure the barrel is clean. Lube it lightly without taking it apart. My Mini's are stainless steel and I take them apart to clean them once a year. I have also smoothed up the barrels by running a brush dipped in Brasso through them. Just to get a mirror smoothness in the barrels.

I like to use a scope to dial in for accuracy. Is it me or is it the gun ? The trigger pull is the biggest issue with me. Most of the time it's me and not the gun. My Mini's triggers have 2 stages. A soft and quick take up (slack) then the release of the hammer with about a 5 lb pull. Learn to use this. Also, full metal jacket ammo tends to be less accurate. I like to load flat base 55, 60 and 62 grain soft points or plastic tip bullets. I really doubt your ammo is getting damaged to the point it is greatly inaccurate.
kwg
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Ok, so it's been a while.

I ended up sending the gun to the European Ruger dealer to address the problem, this was in May. Yesterday, after months of "reminding" them they had my rifle, and that hunting season started a month ago, they finally sent word that it was on its way back to me.

They said the barrel was bad, and their gunsmith has now hand fitted a new barrel.

The rifle will probably arrive today or tomorrow - and I can't wait to test fire it! Hopefully the new barrel will solve all the accuracy issues, and if the barrel was bad, it kind of explains why all "easy fixes" were ineffective.

As far as I know, this will be covered by warranty.
 

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Wow, quite an update! Glad they got it sorted, and you dont have to pay for it :) Very curious to see how it shoots for you now.
 

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Without a bore scope to look at the chamber where the round seats what you are showing does not affect seating. Ten MOA is nearly a safety issue in that the rounds aren't chambering (seating) properly. Spent brass, do the necks show excessive burn marks from blow by? I suppose where you have focused could with excessive material, prevent the bolt from going completely into battery? Send it back for a look at or a local guy with a scope and the ability to check it out.
Bore scopes are getting pretty cheap. I picked up a 10" pistol bore scope for $45 American last spring off of Ebay. They are absolutely worth it.
Teslong Rifle Borescope, Bore Camera Gun Cleaning Camera - Fits .20 Caliber | eBay
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
The new barrel obviously looks a lot less shabby than the old one, at least in the breech area. This is what I would expect it to look like. So the dealer agreed that it shouldn't look like it did earlier.
Automotive tire Wood Bicycle part Tire Rim


After a trip to the range, the new barrel shaves a lot less brass, and it does shoot better than the old one. Still not impressive though, the best I could do from a bench rest at 60 yards with a 9x scope was a 4 MOA group with handloaded 70 gr Nosler RDF, which are very good (and expensive) bullets. With other loads it shot like 5-6 MOA. The old barrel mostly did around 10 MOA with 70 gr, and even up to 15 MOA with others.

Is 4 MOA acceptable for this rifle? I generally shoot around 1-2 MOA with my other rifles under the same circumstances, so maybe 4 MOA is as good as it gets?

The rear peep sight still sits visibly to the right (.06 inches), for the rifle to shoot straight, which I find strange, considering this is a new barrel. Is the receiver bent or something? Isn't the sight base correctly centered? The dealer had sighted it in for me this way, so it's not my crooked eyes playing games here.

Also, the rifle will not reliably cycle 62 gr ammo loaded to 2650 fps. It just doesn't cycle hard enough. Sometimes the brass just jumps up like 2 inches and lands on top of the receiver, or it doesn't eject the spent case, but cycles just enough to strip a new round from the mag, so it double feeds. Other cases fly 15 feet, some of them almost straight forward. I'm using the factory gas port, as I haven't touched anything since I got it back from the dealer.

55 gr @ 3000 fps factory ammo and 70 gr @ 2550 fps are not an issue, so I guess my 62 gr loads just are a bit on the lazy side for a semi auto? (All velocities chronoed in this very gun.)
 

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I usually shoot hand-loaded M855-equivalent loads @3000 fps with reduced gas port and no problems, so it might be worthwhile considering adding more of a powder charge to your 62 gn loads, assuming the handloading book allows doing so safely.

You are using a wooden stock, and sometimes these stocks can be a bit loose. Shimming the inside of the stock where it is supposed to contact the "legs" of the barreled action might help for side-to-side play. Use some thin, incompressible plastic, like that found in credit cards for trials, and if it makes a positive difference, glue the strip(s) to the stock. Steel metal strips are also fine.

Your trigger guard ought to show definite resistance to closing when the trigger guard is about 1/2" away from fully latched position . Consider some shims between the stock and either the lower surface of the receiver where its sides contact the top of the stock, or some shims between the upper ssurface of the trigger group assy and the lower edge of the stock. A small shim at the very rear of the trigger group (near the latch), and sandwiched between the stock and the trigger group may also help reduce possible up-and-down play.

Shimming your wooden stock ought to reduce the size of your groups, assuming that your wooden stock is a bit loose. This situation is not uncommon, and judicious shimming can often help. If you don't want to go through all this, then perhaps consider a tight-fitting synthetic stock, which will save your nice, new, wooden stock from wear and tear.

Your Mini, if it is functioning properly, and using high-quality ammo, ought to be about a 2 MOA firearm, give or take a bit.

I suggest setting-aside the rear sight offset for now. The offset is well within its adjustment range, and getting your groups tighter might require further rear sight adjustments, possibly closer to its' mechanical center. One possibility is to shim only the left side of the receiver "legs", and so "nudge" the rear of the receiver to the right a tiny bit, possibly allowing the rear sight aperture to be moved a bit to the left. Just use the appropriate thickness shim(s). Once properly shimmed, the barreled action/receiver should show some reluctance to come out of the receiver,; I.E., might not drop out freely, but some minor coaxing should allow it to come out of the stock. Some minor force should be required to reinstall the barreled action to the stock, but again, nothing close to working up a sweat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
I usually shoot hand-loaded M855-equivalent loads @3000 fps with reduced gas port and no problems, so it might be worthwhile considering adding more of a powder charge to your 62 gn loads, assuming the handloading book allows doing so safely.

You are using a wooden stock, and sometimes these stocks can be a bit loose. Shimming the inside of the stock where it is supposed to contact the "legs" of the barreled action might help for side-to-side play. Use some thin, incompressible plastic, like that found in credit cards for trials, and if it makes a positive difference, glue the strip(s) to the stock. Steel metal strips are also fine.

Your trigger guard ought to show definite resistance to closing when the trigger guard is about 1/2" away from fully latched position . Consider some shims between the stock and either the lower surface of the receiver where its sides contact the top of the stock, or some shims between the upper ssurface of the trigger group assy and the lower edge of the stock. A small shim at the very rear of the trigger group (near the latch), and sandwiched between the stock and the trigger group may also help reduce possible up-and-down play.

Shimming your wooden stock ought to reduce the size of your groups, assuming that your wooden stock is a bit loose. This situation is not uncommon, and judicious shimming can often help. If you don't want to go through all this, then perhaps consider a tight-fitting synthetic stock, which will save your nice, new, wooden stock from wear and tear.

Your Mini, if it is functioning properly, and using high-quality ammo, ought to be about a 2 MOA firearm, give or take a bit.

I suggest setting-aside the rear sight offset for now. The offset is well within its adjustment range, and getting your groups tighter might require further rear sight adjustments, possibly closer to its' mechanical center. One possibility is to shim only the left side of the receiver "legs", and so "nudge" the rear of the receiver to the right a tiny bit, possibly allowing the rear sight aperture to be moved a bit to the left. Just use the appropriate thickness shim(s). Once properly shimmed, the barreled action/receiver should show some reluctance to come out of the receiver,; I.E., might not drop out freely, but some minor coaxing should allow it to come out of the stock. Some minor force should be required to reinstall the barreled action to the stock, but again, nothing close to working up a sweat.
Thanks for you long and detailed answer!

The stock is pretty tight, but I keep hearing from many sources that you are right - that a loose stock fit is a common culprit for loss of accuracy in the Mini. I will probably have the stock glass bedded, that will probably be the best solution? It will also be more expensive, but I have already put way too much money into this rifle, so it really doesn't matter any more... :)

Further, there is safe room for increasing the load behind the 62 gr bullet with 1-1.5 gr of powder, I guess that will solve that issue as well. I'm currently using 23.5 gr of VV N-135, max for 62 gr FMJ-BT is 24.7 gr. And this is obviously an ammunution related issue, as other ammo runs just fine.

The rear peep sight isn't a big issue, so I will just leave that alone for now.
 

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Thanks for you long and detailed answer!

The stock is pretty tight, but I keep hearing from many sources that you are right - that a loose stock fit is a common culprit for loss of accuracy in the Mini. I will probably have the stock glass bedded, that will probably be the best solution? It will also be more expensive, but I have already put way too much money into this rifle, so it really doesn't matter any more... :)

Further, there is safe room for increasing the load behind the 62 gr bullet with 1-1.5 gr of powder, I guess that will solve that issue as well. I'm currently using 23.5 gr of VV N-135, max for 62 gr FMJ-BT is 24.7 gr. And this is obviously an ammunution related issue, as other ammo runs just fine.

The rear peep sight isn't a big issue, so I will just leave that alone for now.
Apologize for my being very "Wordy", but sometimes it's required.

Given the expense, particularly if you are having someone else do the bedding job, suggest trying out a good synthetic stock instead; the one offered by Ruger is fine. Give it a try; you can always return it if there's no improvement.

Properly bedding the Mini-14 is a little tricky, and I suggest that one's first DIY bedding job be done on a rifle that is much simpler to bed-- which is to say, most rifles.

Bedding the Mini is very much like bedding the M-14/M1A rifles. Any book like this one, which specifically includes bedding instructions for the M-14/M1A should do: The M14 owner's guide and match conditioning instructions: Duff, Scott A: 9781888722079: Amazon.com: Books

On this page you will find some less expensive alternatives to the book linked above: M14 Info, Blueprints, Posters, Mouse Pads, Coffee Mugs
 

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I think you need to run about 800-1000 rounds thru the gun and see if it still acts stupid.
My 580 gun ran perfectly from the start but after 2 classes at Front Sight with 400+ rounds per class in 4 days the gun was completely different when it came home. It was definitely smoother and as far as accuracy goes It has had two types of ammo fed to it. Wolf Steel case, and my Reloads 55gr FMJBT 25.0 gr of W748/BL-C2 which is not a hot load but still runs the gun perfectly. One thing I did was install a Adjustable Gas Piston from ASI early on. It is adjusted so that the gun poops spent cases out 5 feet to the right. This means the action is NOT being repositioned in the stock everytime the trigger is pulled! which is what happens with the stock gas bushing.

These guns need to be seriously broken in to function correctly. But the single thing you can do to make them shoot better is to choke the gas down to where it ejects cases less than 10 or so feet right out of the gate. This prevents that big chunk of steel on the Op Rod from hammering the front of the receiver and banging it around in the stock. My gun threw steel cases 30+ feet to the right before this mod, so it was taking a serious hit everytime I pulled the trigger! This definitely affects accuracy and is probably what is wrong with your gun.

Automotive tire Synthetic rubber Bicycle part Automotive lighting Bumper


Now it shoots like this

Gesture Art Circle Font Space


As far as shaving brass, just shoot the hell out of it and it will eventually knock all the sharp edges off the internals.
Randy
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
I think you need to run about 800-1000 rounds thru the gun and see if it still acts stupid.
My 580 gun ran perfectly from the start but after 2 classes at Front Sight with 400+ rounds per class in 4 days the gun was completely different when it came home. It was definitely smoother and as far as accuracy goes It has had two types of ammo fed to it. Wolf Steel case, and my Reloads 55gr FMJBT 25.0 gr of W748/BL-C2 which is not a hot load but still runs the gun perfectly. One thing I did was install a Adjustable Gas Piston from ASI early on. It is adjusted so that the gun poops spent cases out 5 feet to the right. This means the action is NOT being repositioned in the stock everytime the trigger is pulled! which is what happens with the stock gas bushing.

These guns need to be seriously broken in to function correctly. But the single thing you can do to make them shoot better is to choke the gas down to where it ejects cases less than 10 or so feet right out of the gate. This prevents that big chunk of steel on the Op Rod from hammering the front of the receiver and banging it around in the stock. My gun threw steel cases 30+ feet to the right before this mod, so it was taking a serious hit everytime I pulled the trigger! This definitely affects accuracy and is probably what is wrong with your gun.
It probably needs some breaking in as well. It ejects cases quite inconsistently - it throws cases all around, from 1-5 o'clock, at distances varying from 0 to 15 feet. Original gas port bushing. I have the gas bushing kit from ASI, and I tried that before the barrel was changed. It made no real difference for accuracy, but it gave me more malfunctions from incomplete cycling. Will definately try them again now with the new barrel.

When I manually close the bolt when chambering a round, the charging handle stops an inch before going into full battery and has to be pushed into battery. And I'm not following the handle or anything - the stoppage is quite hard, and it takes a serious push to get it into battery. If I drop the handle real hard it will usually overcome this, and when the gun is cycling on its own, it works. But is it supposed to be this tight? When a round is not chambered, it's all buttery smooth, so it's the chambered round that's making it hard.

@RIBob I actually have an original synthetic stock lying around, which the rifle was originally shipped with. With the old barrel, changing the stock made no difference, but I could always try to swap it back now. It's always good to try and filter out what makes a change and what doesn't.

With the old barrel, it was difficult to tell any difference, when 10-15 MOA was the best it could do. If changing the stock back then improved it 2 MOA it would probably be hard to tell. But now, with a new barrel, things may be different.
 

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Does the action cycle freely with no magazine in it? It is not unusual for bad magazines to cause feeding problems?

If it doesn't cycle freely with the Mag out, then there is a good possibility the receiver has been squashed and the bolt races are no longer aligned. They probably could be tweaked back into alignment by a careful gunsmith ?

Also lots of times just downloading the magazine 1-2 rounds will reduce the spring tension on the follower and allow perfect feeding . My 580 series gun won't feed off of a full 20 or30 round mag. I have to drop 1-2 and then it functions perfectly.
Also your brass shaving is more than likely the result of rough edges on the feed lips of the magazine or magazines.
Ruger Brand magazines are well known to be just about the only brand of magazines that consistently work well in Mini 14's, and even then, some need TLC to work well. Once again shooting many rounds thru the gun will eventually clean up the magazines as well.. Promags and various others from the aftermarket generally suck,,,, with few exceptions !!!

Another thing to look at is "Proper Lubrication." I use Vaseline on the Bolt Races, and Op Rod Cam. Synthetic Motor Oil on all the little parts and pivots etc. The rear of the bolt also needs lubrication where it contacts the underside of the Bolt Shroud. This point is often missed by most users. It is generally recommended to use a thick low speed grease like Lubriplate for this, and this is a carry over from M1 Garands. Vaseline or some other grease will work there as well.,

As far as bedding the action and all this other falderal to fix unknown gross problems, it isn't going to fix the root cause of your problems until you definitively figure out what is wrong. Things like that are for fine tuning the gun after it runs perfectly.

It's Kind of like sending Kamala Harris to El Salvador to find the "Root Cause" of all the insane migration from there, when all she had to do was stand in front of a full length mirror with Biden and it would be obvious what the root cause really is??? ;>) You've probably heard that we have some problems with the current leadership here in the US right now?

Then again, You might be better off selling the gun and buying a different one. I realize you are not in the US and it might be harder to get a replacement, but it doesn't sound like it would be harder than chasing a problem that has eluded detection so far.

A "Football" term (not Soccer) we use here in the US is, "4th and long yardage, time to Punt!"

This should give you a few other things to look at?

Randy
 

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Concur that your Mini could stand some "breaking-in" Watch the series of Brownell's videos about the Mini-14: brownell's videos on mini-14 - Bing Scroll down just a little to find the vids.

The only thing Brownell's omits is putting a little grease on the "hooks" of the trigger guard, and the slots where these hooks interface with the receiver.
 

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Something I like to do it scrub my barrel with Brasso. Brasso has a bit of pumis or other like kind of scrubber. I do this to smooth up the barrel. W.R suggested 800 to 1000 rounds. I think you can do this much quicker with the Brasso or something like it. We have JB Bore bright in the States but the Brasso has the added benefit of taking out any layered copper that is deposited in the barrel while shooting. It does contain a small amount of ammonia in it which dissolves the copper. It may just be that you will need an Accu Strut in the future but for now I suggest shooting and cleaning the barrel.

Another issue I discovered is, if you remove the barreled action every time you clean the rifle, you have to start over with getting it accurate. I believe the term is "harmonic settling". Using one of my stainless steel Mini's I went well over 1000 rounds before taking it apart and cleaning it. About every 250 rounds I would pull a bore snake through the barrel to reduce the carbon in the barrel and that was it. The rifle never lost accuracy and it never failed to operate. The accuracy was about 3 - 4 inches at 100 yards. It was also one of the skinny barrels so the accuracy was pretty much what I expected out of a skinny barrel with no accu strut.

kwg
Etc.
One thing I am currently exploring is making the primer flash hole uniform in size. I am finding that the factory brass has a hole of approximately .076 to .080 in diameter. My brass typically goes in different directions. I tested some ammo with the primer hole uniformed to .086" (eighty six thousands) and my brass tended to land in one spot. I was surprised at this. Was it an anomaly ? I haven't finished the project so I don't know for sure. I had zero flat primers with Winchester primers. I took the holes all the way to .101" and then I started getting flat primers with a bit of splash in the primers.

Keep in mind I was using some CCI #400's and pretty much every primer was flat with 24.4 grains of IMR 3031 and a 55 grain bullet but I had no flat primers with the same load with the Winchester primers. I assume the Winchester primers have a thicker cup. For those of you who know what a numbered bit is, I get .086" primer holes with a # 44 and .081 with a #45.

kwg
 

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KWG: Keep in mind that that 800-100 rounds was not just barrel break in. You can break a barrel in with 100-150 shots if you do it right.
What I was talking about is the all the sliding ways in the receiver and all moving parts that interact with each other getting worn in. The Trigger and general Fire Control Mechinism needs cycling to wear in and function smoothly. It is hard to do that by hand and I am not a big fan of stoning trigger sears etc.

My Mini 14 is a 580 series gun made in 2005. It is one of the few guns I own that I never applied any TLC to the internals. Most of my guns get a top to bottom deburring and smoothing out. This one was done by shooting it.

This gun got the ASI Adjustable Gas Piston, which was $35 at the time, and I drilled the hole in the gas block for the adjustment screw. It also got a 1911 buffer pad. These were just like the regular fixed gas piston except they were made by ASI with a 4-40 hole drilled and tapped from the front for a screw that could choke off the gas. Then they were heat treated. You can't drill a stock one as they are super hard.
Mine was closed all the way, and the action didn't cycle, I then opened it 1 full turn and it pooped the brass out 5 feet to my right. I've never changed it since then. Prior to the Adjustable Gas Piston it pitched Wolf Steel cases 30 feet to the right! That was eye opening and I quickly figured out that the big chunk of steel bar on the op rod was banging into the receiver everytime it fired !!!. This was repositioning the action in the stock with every shot. This is not conducive of any kind of repeatable accuracy and IMHO the root cause of the Mini 14's reputation for sub par accuracy.
(Over-gassing!)

On my Ruger Magazines I took a fine stone to the underside of the feed lips and then finished them off with a Cratex Point on my Foredom tool. (Cratex is like a pencil eraser with Grit mixed into it. Mainly used in Polishing Ports in engines.) None of my magazines shave brass.

I bought a case of Wolf Steel Cased ammo right after I got my Mini in 2006. probably 700 of that 1000 have been ran thru that gun. I'm sure the steel cases have had a some polishing/peening effect on the high spots in that action where cartridges come in contact.
.
With ear protection on, this gun goes "Ker-plink- Plunk" when it cycles. I expect it every time I pull the trigger. It is quite enjoyable to shoot and is one of my favorites.

Randy
 
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W.R Buchanon said
"KWG: Keep in mind that that 800-100 rounds was not just barrel break in. You can break a barrel in with 100-150 shots if you do it right.
What I was talking about is the all the sliding ways in the receiver and all moving parts that interact with each other getting worn in. The Trigger and general Fire Control Mechinism needs cycling to wear in and function smoothly. It is hard to do that by hand and I am not a big fan of stoning trigger sears etc."

OK. I was in reference to the barrel but you are right. If will probably take a bit longer to finish breaking in the rest of the rifle. I have thought about doing the adjustable gas block but I have other fish to fry right now so it is a future consideration.

kwg
 

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Call ASI and see if they have any of the Drilled Gas Pistons laying around. Mine was $35. Then all you have to do is drill a hole in the existing Gas Block like mine and put a screw in it.
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