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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I finished this last night, got the parts from Carolina Shooters Supply, ordered them Thursday and got them Monday. Tapco trigger, Hogue grip, SKS sling, Dinzag bullet guide. Kvar NATO length stock. Can't wait to go shoot it, the trigger is much better than stock.
 

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Spikester,

Nice job on your Saiga conversion project.

I like how you've configured the rifle. It's a combination of "classic" styling meets noticeable upgrades.

Yes, the Tapco G2 trigger is quite nice. In fact, with some minor polishing of the contact surfaces with a rubber compound wheel and a Dremel tool, and then finishing them off with some Flitz on a buffing wheel, the Tapco G2 is quite nice. I do this on all my G2 triggers.

BTW, I like that you've retained the BHO function.

Again, nice work! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the kind words, I like the classic looks for me, don't care for rails and AR stocks.
 

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Thanks for the kind words, I like the classic looks for me, don't care for rails and AR stocks.
Roger that.

In fact, I'm actually thinking of doing another conversion and going with a "classic" AK-47 look.

Again, nice job! ;)
 

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How did you do the bullet guide? I have been contemplating finishing up my saiga but i'm not so sure how I wanna go about installing it....

I have had a friend tap and drill that turned into a bad idea because it broke off.
He welded it with a regular wire feed welder and it did the trick.

I was thinking about using sodder and a soddering iron to instal.

whats your take?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I wouldn't trust solder, it's soft and I don't think it would hold. I tapped mine and had no problem, just have to be sure to drill correct sized hole and use tap lube, only turn tap about a 1/8th turn and back it out 1/2 turn to clean the chips out of the threads, in a little, out a lot more, go slowly, you can't rush tapping.
 

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I wouldn't trust solder, it's soft and I don't think it would hold. I tapped mine and had no problem, just have to be sure to drill correct sized hole and use tap lube, only turn tap about a 1/8th turn and back it out 1/2 turn to clean the chips out of the threads, in a little, out a lot more, go slowly, you can't rush tapping.
N1ghtk1d,

I agree with Spikester...I wouldn't trust solder.

I won't lie...drilling and tapping for the bullet guide was/is a PIA...at least the first time you do it. The second time I did it, it was actually a breeze. Really...no B$.

That said, on my first attempt, I broke two taps in the hole I drilled. Why? Simple...I rushed the tapping process.

Again, Spikester is correct with his advice...GO SLOW!!! And, I can't emphasis that enough.

You see, because the tap is so small, if you can feel the tap cutting, you are probably going to fast. Moreover, if you start to see the tap flex, you're going to fast.

What I wound-up doing on the second time around is to METHODICALLY turn the tap ONLY 1/16 of a turn at at time. Then, I backed it out, and continued on with the process. But, I never went faster than that...even if I felt I could.

Also, what I've read somewhere online...and have used with success...is to use an air compressor to blow the metal shavings off the tap and out of the hole as you cut the threads. This works very nicely to keep your work going smoothly, as well as to see what the heck you're doing.

Keep in mind, you should also be using some sort of lubricant on the tap, as you cut the threads into the hole. I recommend using cutting oil (yes, there is a specific oil used for cutting).

Aside from that, if your workshop allows, I highly recommend using a drill press and drill press vice for the drilling process, as well as to hold the tap as you cut the threads. This makes it easier to ensure you're not "off-kilter" with your tapping.

Now, I'm sure a drill press is not essential. But, I'm a persnickety dude, so I used my drill press.

As far as the propensity for your tap to break?? YES, it's definitely there. But again, GO SLOW!! (did I mention that already? LOL!)

If you break a tap, the good news is that they're fairly brittle. So, you can take a punch and give it a good whack with a hammer, and the tap will probably break apart. Luckily, where my taps broke, I could get them out with a pair of pliers and some elbow grease. But, I have read many threads that suggest that you simply take a punch and give 'em a whack. And, based on how easily the tap broke, I tend to suspect this is true.

If you GO SLOW, this won't really be such an issue. But, if you do break a tap, and you then remove the broken tap from the hole, you will need to buy another tap (they're not that expensive). Just make sure you get the correct size. In fact, for my second bullet guide install, I had two extra taps sitting on-hand...just in case.

Finally, here's where I've gotten my bullet guides for my Saiga "conversion" projects:

Dinzag Arms

(A good guy to work with...good products!...and reasonably fast shipping times! I'm a fan.)

In conclusion, yes bullet guide installation is a somewhat tense part of the "conversion" of a Saiga rifle. But, if you GO SLOW, you will be surprised at the ease at which you will tap the hole.

A few tips for you:
* The trunnion where you drill/tap is not as thick as you think it would be. So, this whole drilling and tapping process is not a major ordeal. About a 30 minute job...tops, if you do it right.
* I use BLUE loctite on the hex screw for the final install, just to make sure that it stays in there over time. (Don't use RED loctite; it's permanent. You might have to replace the bulllet guide some day).
* I put a very slight chamfer on the bullet guide, where the tips of the bullets hit it. To do this, and I hold the bullet guide at a 45 degree angle, and run it across a hand file a few times. Less is more here. It's just enough to take the square edge off the bullet guide. (this is NOT necessary, but I like to do it to ensure good feeding of the rounds into the chamber right out of the gate).

Aside from that, if you're on the fence, I wouldn't be. You see, even if you completely screw it up, you can still use factory mags, or buy SureFire magazines.

But, if you take your time and be patient, you'll see that it's a more than doable job for a basement/garage armorer to handle.

Let us/me if you have any questions.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Went to the range today, tried several types ammo just to see what shot the best. I had to order a sight tool after the first time to the range, it was way high at 100 yards so today I dialed it in. Uly, Wolf MC HP, Brown Bear/Monarch FMJ and HP shot about the same. The best groups I got were Silver Bear soft points, beat everything else I tried, I got 3 3/4" to 4" groups shooting from two shooting bags stacked up from the bench at 100 yards, I liked it. The others were about 5" or better. I like the Tapco trigger but it has a lot of creep before it goes off, I wish it had a little better feel to it, it's smooth but creeps in and finally goes off.
 

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When shooting at 100 yards with irons, did you feel that the front post covers more of the target than you wish??

I took the dremel and cut the profile of my front sight to a fine "tall pyramid"... I cut it at fine angles along the sides, then turned it 1/4 turn and did the other sides till it was a nice 4 sided pyramid. Long and tall... not short and stubby. I did not want to lose any height on the metal.

I found that by taking the tip of the FS post to a point I could reduce group sizes even more, as I could put the point on a much smaller target dot at that range...

I am rather partial to Saigas... you may have seen me on the Saiga forums from time to time... under the same name. :)



:lol:
 

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I took the dremel and cut the profile of my front sight to a fine "tall pyramid"... I cut it at fine angles along the sides, then turned it 1/4 turn and did the other sides till it was a nice 4 sided pyramid. Long and tall... not short and stubby. I did not want to lose any height on the metal.

I found that by taking the tip of the FS post to a point I could reduce group sizes even more, as I could put the point on a much smaller target dot at that range...
This is a good idea! Thanks for sharing! ;)

Yep, I'm with you...I've become very partial to Saiga's myself. :cool:
 

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Very nice! I was thinking about ordering the Hogue Pistol Grip for mine. How do you like it?
There is not a better grip for an AK, IMO..

I have Hogues on 2 - Saiga 12's and have been slowly converting other guns to Hogues.. Just put a Hogue on a 1911, and will be putting a Hogue on a couple other AK's and a Browning Buckmark I just picked up..

I love the Hogues..
 

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That came out beautiful. Nice job!
I wish I had the commitment to do a rifle conversion in 5.45. I did a saiga 12 last year but the bullet guide thing just puts me off.
 
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