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I get out and shoot my firearms maybe a dozen times a year. I would consider myself a moderate shooter. Until recently, I didn't think I used enough ammo to justify taking up reloading. Well, with the ammo prices increasing with each year and the recent scarcity of it all, I think I'm ready.

I've been eying the Dillon Precision RL550B machine. I watched the video on it and it seems to be simple enough. Is this a good machine? It runs about $450. What other machines would you all recommend in that range?

Dillon Precision: Reloaders, Reloading Equipment, Bullet Reloading, Bullet Reloaders
 

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Dillon's are good machines, however it's very hard to recommend a progressive press to a new reloader. Single stage presses make the best learners tool, and have many uses IF you decide to go progressive later.

Purchase a good manual (Sierra, Nosler, Hornady) first, and study the "how to" section in it first. Than purchase your press. BTW, components are also hard to find, esp primers and powder (which can't be easily shipped, so you need to obtain those locally).
Reloading is not difficult physically, however the mental side can be a little intimidating.
 

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Dillon's are good machines, however it's very hard to recommend a progressive press to a new reloader. Single stage presses make the best learners tool, and have many uses IF you decide to go progressive later.

Purchase a good manual (Sierra, Nosler, Hornady) first, and study the "how to" section in it first. Than purchase your press. BTW, components are also hard to find, esp primers and powder (which can't be easily shipped, so you need to obtain those locally).
Reloading is not difficult physically, however the mental side can be a little intimidating.
Very true,I have a Dillon RL550 Get used to a single stage before trying to use a progressive. You will need a single stage anyway. I load all my serious hunting ammo on a single stage.
 

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unfortunately... you are a little LATE TO THE GAME... While reloading is a fun and enjoyable hobby... chances are RIGHT NOW components you want are going to be VERY SCARCE like everything else ammo related...

IF you can find components... have at it... but I think the powder, primers, brass, and bullets are going to be the weak link in your plans... Sorry... :(
 

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:lol:Fyi-I have dillons (plural) and they can and are used in the single stage mode quite successfully all of the time.I do this for making precision rifle ammo but not for pistols,in the pistol mode I use them as full out progressive presses,and they work fine.Only thing to think about is with some of the magnum pistol rounds-is that the primer pockets should be cleaned so that the primer will seat deep enough to allow for the cylinder on revolvers to rotate with out "high primer" dragging!;)
 

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:lol:Reloading is not rocket science-maybe a close second tho!:blink:
 

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Primers are wicked hard to get right now. A local dealer is charging 100 dollars for 1000 of them. He can keep them in my opinion. Ill wait till midway sends me notification and order 5000 so the hazmat fee isn't so bad. Crazy he charging almost what 5000 cost for 1000.
 

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I get out and shoot my firearms maybe a dozen times a year. I would consider myself a moderate shooter. Until recently, I didn't think I used enough ammo to justify taking up reloading. Well, with the ammo prices increasing with each year and the recent scarcity of it all, I think I'm ready.

I've been eying the Dillon Precision RL550B machine. I watched the video on it and it seems to be simple enough. Is this a good machine? It runs about $450. What other machines would you all recommend in that range?

Dillon Precision: Reloaders, Reloading Equipment, Bullet Reloading, Bullet Reloaders
Hi Sid, I had a 550b that I gave to a nephew a few years ago when I had a hiatus in the shooting sports. The 550b is a great progressive press. I have again become interested in shooting and began reloading again with a single stage press. That press was too slow when trying to reload a thousand rounds. I then purchased the low cost Lee Classic Turret press (4-die) and haven't looked back. It's a bit slower than the Dillon, but the price is low and it can pump out ~200rds/hr. The Auto-disk powder measure is low cost enough that you can easily afford to buy an Auto-disk powder measure for every caliber you reload. I highly recommend the Lee Classic Turret reloading press.

Regards,
Richard
 

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I actually load all of my pistol stuff (9mm, .357M, 40S&W .41M, 45acp) on a Dillon Square Deal B (SDB). It was my first press, and only got a single stage later when I wanted to start loading some rifle ammo (SDB only does pistol cartridges).

To me, loading ammo that is fired in high volume (i.e pistol) on a single stage is a nauseating task. I can easily crank out 300 rnds/hr on a progressive press...giving me more time to shoot, or load my precision rifle stuff on my Rock Chucker.

Definitely read up and understand the principals of reloading. However, I would not half step with a single stage press if you plan to reload in volume.
 

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I think you would be better off starting with a LEE turret press 4 hole 112.99 from Midway This is a deluxe kit. You need to look it up at Midway. This will let you get a good start to see if this is what you want to do. If you do not like it you can always get out with out losing a lot of money. Your kit will be easy to sale. Buy your self a Lyman reloading book and read it good before reloading. If you know some one that reloads ask them to help you get started. I use a lot of Accurate powder so I also have there reloading book. All so I use a lot of Serra bullets so I have there book also. GOOD LUCK
 

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I have been reloading since the early 70's started with lee hand dies and a plastic hammer.
The advice I have is start with a single stage press, use only powders that fill your cases at least 3/4 full (prevents double charges) take your time, be careful when inserting primers
always wear safety glasses for all operations. If you use a powder drop fine but if you are going to load near or maximum charges use a scale. Under charged cases are as dangerous as over charged cases. Prices right now on equipment are at an all time high. Look for the best deal you can get on equipment and components. The most expensive stuff is not always the best. Get as much info as you can, get several good manuals. Most important be safe.
 

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Hi, just a note to say that the Lee reloading manual has lots of great reloading information and includes most all caliber bullets and powder loads. Save the money buying specific reloading manuals and buy the Lee.

Regards,
Richard
 

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When I started it was suggested to get at least two manuals. I got Speer and Nosler but later added Sierra. There actually was a huge difference in max loads info for my rounds between manuals. I opted for safe than sorry.
Reloading is an enjoyable activity when done prudently.
I get accuracy that I only could dream of before rollin' my own!

BTW, if the initial cash outlay is burdensome consider used equipment...it's out there for sometimes very good prices.
For my purposes a new Rock Chucker was the answer...never regreted it!
Good luck!
 

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Sid,

Like many I was a bit intimidated be the Dillon progressive machines and did a lot of research and talk to several owners prior to taking the plunge about 10 years ago.

Dillon's RL550B is a great machine and is so very easy to use. I can't tell you how easy using it is to master and the quality of your reloads are top shelf.

My Dillon RL550B loads;

Pistol - 9mm, 40 S&W, .357 SIG, 44 Magnum, and 45 ACP
Rifle - .223 Remington, .308 Winchester

with all of the above I still use my single stage Hornady 00-7 press a lot, especially developing new loads or forming cases for a new cartridge...

.300 Blackout



All of my Bench Rest or Target ammunition is done on the Hornady 00-7.
 
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