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Why are some lead cast bullets slightly heaver, up to 2grains, than the listing on the box? I see this with many manufactures. Also, should I charge the round to the recipe and not worry about the weight difference of the projectile?
 

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Minor variations in the alloy. No biggie.
None of the reloading manuals (or other reliable sources) segregate loads to a few grains difference, load 'em up by the recipe.

Hopefully this goes without saying, but DO NOT start with maximum or near-maximum charges of powder. If you must load to max (and that is rarely necessary), work up to it incrementally.
 

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I agree with the above poster!


There are minor variances in weight with most all bullets. The more expensive the type and brand, the tighter the tolerances.

There is not too much to be concerned with lead bullets though.

Depending on your alloy, keep velocities below 1000fps to control leading.

Above all, don't deviate from your manual on powder charges and work up slowly.

It doesn't matter much on handguns but some rifle shooters will seperate the different bullet weights and only load those of the same weight
 

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1) variation in alloy content
2) variation in melt temperature
3) variation in mold temperature
4) Different mold cavities
Until you are shooting well over 100 yards, the weight variation is of no consequence.
As far as your gun is concerned, lead bullets of, say, 120-125gn are all the same. Difference in friction and hardness of copper plated and jacketed bullets has a greater effect on pressure than +/- 3% weight variation.
Do remember, while thinking these thoughts, that the history of shooting (500 years?) is cast lead, so most of these concerns have been worked out already.
If you can find them, you can get swaged lead bullets that are 2/6/92 alloy and VERY consistent in diameter and weight.
The biggest problems with commercial cast lead bullets are:
1) folks not slugging their barrel so they know the minimum bullet diameter that will work
2) an alloy so hard (18-22BHN) that the bullet can not obdurate (be squeezed up) to fill the bore, making an oversize lead bullet even more important. Most handguns (even .44 Mag) can be handled quite well with 10-14 BHN alloy.
 
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