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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I purchased a used Colt AR-15, H bar, target competition last year. It has a full stock (not collapsible). I was shooting today and noticed a funny feeling in the stock when I fired each round. It sounded like the buffer was bouncing off the back of the tube.

I was shooting different reloaded rounds and noticed that some shots made the buffer bounced more than others.

I then fired my friends Colt LE and did not notice any bounce.

I did take the spring out and check the buffer, every thing seemed OK.

Does anyone know if this is normal???

Also what is the overall length of the buffer spring?

Does anyone recommend a buffer and spring that might take care of this bounce?

Thanks in advance.

Larry
 

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I asked my friend who works at the Bushmaster plant in Ilion the same question last summer. I too have an HBAR (home built) using a Spikes Tactical Receiver. He said heavier spring or bolt carrier. So I got a heavier spring from Wolf. I also took the buffer apart and added some lead into one of the hollow weights. About 200 grains I think. I tested with my normal ammo and all is well. Doesn't throw brass so far and it cycles fine. The best part is that you could reverse the process just as fast. Do some Google research on the subject, there is some good info out there.

The bad. It won't cycle the bolt on my 300 Blackout upper. I have another lower that works well with it so it's not all bad.
 

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What you are hearing is pretty much normal. If the gun feeds and cycles properly I wouldn't worry about it. A hotter and/or heavier load is naturally going to cause more recoil and that is going to cause the buffer to recoil faster and/or harder. If you are experiencing problems cycling then you may want to look into something different but those guys at Colt are pretty sharp. They've been building that rifle for over 60 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I didnt have any issue with cycling.

The problem is my ear muffs press against the stock and when I fire a round it amplifies the vibrations of the spring and buffer and i can hear every rattle, bounce, spring vibrations etc....

Someone did tell me that the springs will wear out, or the inside diameter of the buffer tube is larger than normal or the spring is small then normal.

Buying this used, it was in great shape didnt look like many rounds went through it but the owner was using WOLF ammo, steel cases.

Larry
 

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Wolf ammo won't cause any premature wear on the buffer system. It more than likely won't cause any problems at all but if it did, it would be more likely to cause an extractor to break or something like that. I think what you are hearing is normal and like you said, the ear muffs are just amplifying it. That's why I use foam ear plugs but the ear muffs are pretty sure to give you better hearing protection. It's your call. I wouldn't worry about it unless you see a problem starting to occur. Of course springs can wear out but I would be willing to bet if your rifle had enough rounds fired to wear out a buffer spring, you would be able to see the signs of wear in other places.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
When I mentioned Wolf ammo it was not for the wear and tear on the gun it was for the dirty soot left from the powder.

I had never taken a bolt assembly apart until yesterday. I could not believe that the gun would function with the amount of crud I removed from the bolt, firing pin and gas ports.

Shame on me for waiting this long. :eek:

But then, it is a Colt and made to function in dirty conditions...;)

I bet it will operate better now.

Thanks for the advise....

Larry
 

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You should have seen what one looked like after two weeks of "war games' in the Army shooting blanks through them. We would get back from the field and spend hours cleaning our weapons before they would let us do anything else, like eat or sleep.
 

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My earlier post was my cure for what ailed my AR and solved the problem of throwing brass into the next county. The slightly slower cycle time is supposed to increase reliability of feeding and decrease wear on the bolt. In most instances unnecessary, but very inexpensive to try. Fully reversible.
 

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Correct!

Some people apply a bunch of grease into the buffer tube and on the spring & buffer to quiet down that "BOING!" sound somewhat.
Use some white lithium grease and coat the spring-assembly and reinstall. You will be amazed how much that smooth's things out.
 

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Like buffers, the buffer springs too are available in varying degrees of resistance to the backwards force of the Bolt. The first importance is to ensure your spring is matched to the size of your buffer tube (rifle length or carbine length tube). A rifle length buffer spring is approximately 12" long +- ¾", and a carbine length spring is approximately 10 ¾" +- ¾". After determining your proper spring length, you must determine which spring resistance is right for you.

There are springs on the market which have increased or reduced resistance to the bolts rearward movement when compared to a standard military specification spring. Mixing and matching spring tension with buffer weight will have different effects on your AR15. It is generally suggested to start with a standard buffer spring.
AR15 Buffer Assembly & AR15 Buffer Options | ChicagoGunSmith.com

Looking at brownells, they have some "tuned" buffer springs that are about 1" longer than spec.
 

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+1 on embracing the boing.

I got a heavier buffer tube and that was a noticeable improvement.
 
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