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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just got a Mini 14 patrol. What are your break in procedures for these rifles? Until now, I've been a bolt action shooter with extensive barrel break in experience. Just wondering if anything special needs to be done besides a field strip and cleaning. I will shoot my reloads first and test Wolf Poly after break in.
Also, any special tools or cleaning gear needed? I've got rods, jags, snakes, and every cleaning/lube chemical ever made.
 

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Sounds like you got it covered.
Only thing I recommend, as most others here will, is to grease it like a Garand. The manual doesn't call for grease, but it doesnt fly off that slammin' action.
 

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I've found tooth paste is great to polish the moving parts. :)

Pull your trigger group, and put a thin coat of tooth past on the hammer, sear and other parts that slide/rub/touch, and shoot a few hundred rounds.

Then clean it up, and you will find it's very nice and smooth.

Other option is to do, or have a trigger job done. (I clean up the cuts/angles, and use a dremel to polish the contact points like a mirror.)

Tooth past on the bullet for 5 rounds, followed by 5 rounds clean, and then 5 rounds with a dab on the bullet is a nice way to fire lap your barrel too. Washes right out later, and you only need to do this for 20 rounds or so with the tooth paste. (So one box of 50 does the trick, half with the dab of tooth paste, the other half clean/bare, and then clean the rifle barrel/breach. Perhaps re-coat the action at that point, and shoot another 100 rounds, then clean the action/trigger/hammer and rest of the rifle.)

I use chain wax on my auto loading weapons, it does not fling, does not attract dirt, and lubricates like grease.

DuPont Teflon Dry Wax in the blue can, from Lowe's is the best stuff I've found, and it's cheaper than Rem. Dry Lube/wax.

I used it on my motorcycle chain for years, and use it on my weapons now since it works so well, and does not attract dirt much. (It actually encapsulates any dirt/powder residue, then sheds it away from the action, keeping the moving parts cleaner during use.)

It goes on like WD40, but then solidifies up into a thin waxy coating.
 
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I've found tooth paste is great to polish the moving parts. :)

Pull your trigger group, and put a thin coat of tooth past on the hammer, sear and other parts that slide/rub/touch, and shoot a few hundred rounds.

Then clean it up, and you will find it's very nice and smooth.

Other option is to do, or have a trigger job done. (I clean up the cuts/angles, and use a dremel to polish the contact points like a mirror.)

Tooth past on the bullet for 5 rounds, followed by 5 rounds clean, and then 5 rounds with a dab on the bullet is a nice way to fire lap your barrel too. Washes right out later, and you only need to do this for 20 rounds or so with the tooth paste. (So one box of 50 does the trick, half with the dab of tooth paste, the other half clean/bare, and then clean the rifle barrel/breach. Perhaps re-coat the action at that point, and shoot another 100 rounds, then clean the action/trigger/hammer and rest of the rifle.)

I use chain wax on my auto loading weapons, it does not fling, does not attract dirt, and lubricates like grease.

DuPont Teflon Dry Wax in the blue can, from Lowe's is the best stuff I've found, and it's cheaper than Rem. Dry Lube/wax.

I used it on my motorcycle chain for years, and use it on my weapons now since it works so well, and does not attract dirt much. (It actually encapsulates any dirt/powder residue, then sheds it away from the action, keeping the moving parts cleaner during use.)

It goes on like WD40, but then solidifies up into a thin waxy coating.
Interesting. When I acquired my Mini 14, I thought about using a similar product that I use on my mountain bike chain. However, I know it will become liquid when heated and therefore I passed on it. What I have been using for over 30 years on my 10-22 and other rifles is dry powder Molybdenum Disulfide. Molybdenum Disulfide was used extensively in the space program because of its' molecular make up, having superior lubrication qualities and not being affected by extreme heat or cold and as far as I know, non flammable. Molybdenum Disulfide does not attract powder residue. My guns have always been in a dry climate, so no rust.. If constantly exposed to humidity I would definitely keep my guns well oiled while not being used, however, I would remove the oil from the actions with electronic tuner cleaner and thoroughly coat all contact surfaces with Molybdenum Disulfide before I put them through their paces.
I am in no way saying that my lubrication regime is what is best for every assault weapon owner. :D

Just sharing info and personal experience.
I would appreciate some well thought out feedback.
Dave
 

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Welcome aboard, JDMANN! Best prepare your wife (and your banker...:lol:) for the Mini sickness!

The "break-in" procedure for Mini rifles isn't so much about accuracy as it is about reliability.

My 580 would stovepipe and fail to feed about 20% of the time when it was brand new. The more I shot it, the better it ran. After about 200-300 rounds it really smoothed out and has run like a Swiss watch ever since. As long as I feed it quality ammo from good (read: Ruger or ProMag) magazines, and it won't let me down.

My recommendation? Strip, clean, and oil/grease it first. The crap Ruger puts on it at the factory is designed for corrosion resistance during storage/shipping, not for lubrication. Like others have posted, I use the old mantra, "If it pivots, oil it. If it slides, grease it." I prefer Hoppe's Gun Grease -- a little dab'll do. ;)

One more thing: Remember to NOT ride the op rod with your hand, or you'll cause a failure to feed on the next round. Took me about 200 rounds to figure that out. :lol: Pull the op rod all the way back (until you hear the bolt release click), and let 'er fly!
 

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I like to polish the moving parts as well, and run a patch with a mild abrasive like JB Bore paste or jewelers paste, tooth paste may work too. It saves on ammo to give the barrel a little polishing with a rod as to shooting, at $1 shot. Light oiling is good, synthetics work very well.
 

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I am in same boat new 582 series wondered about breaking out the dremel and polishing all that rotates/slides and was wondering about lube. Also thinking about trigger job as well.
I did on my 30 tact. Especially the op rod and receivers op rod guide/shelf. The milling was very rough and uneven.
The slide tabs (yes I'm making names up) on the bolt and where the contact inside the receiver. I used Flitz polish.
I grease those points I mentioned, and where the rod slides along the barrel and forearm liner.
It actually makes cleaning easier too. The hot carbon doesn't dry it out and cake it on. It doesn't take much. I use this high temp multi duty lithium complex grease. 5 bucks for 14 oz.. It will last for decades.

Super Tech Multi-Duty Grease, 1 lb: Automotive : Walmart.com
 

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haha... yeah.... Napa wheel bearing grease for me, on the sliding stuff... and brake cleaner for the teardown cleaning.... Hoppes #9 for the chamber/bore/trigger group cleaning and then Rem oil. So nice my Walmart has sporting goods next to automotive.
 

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Frog Lube on everything.. I used to do grease and oil, I do Frog Lube now.

It works, it completely stops the magazines from rusting which you will find out quickly that they do,,, instantly!

I do use a dab of Lubriplate grease on the underside of the rear portion of the receiver where the bolt hits when cycling.

Other than that it is Frog Lube on everything. Makes cleaning easier too since NOTHING STICKS TO IT.

This is simply my .02 of this subject. Really any oil and or grease will work on these guns, they are not finicky at all and all the rules of Garand Lubrication apply directly to Mini 14/30's

Randy
 
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I've tried a lot of the of the shelf stuff . about 10 yr's ago I started makin my own. Pretty simple 2 part's Mobil 1 syn / 1 part Lucas full syn additive in the black bottle , shake well . For my grease I use HI Moly full syn high temp , high speed bearing grease. Treat it like a Garand. Never had any problem's wiyh this mix gun is easy to clean. Everything is polished also using semichrome & Flitz using a Dremel. ;) I broke my gun in on 1000 rnds of PMC back when it was cheap . :wacko:
 

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Fine all of you talk about the tricks and lube but I am new to this. On my SKS I have a floating Pin, whitch I keep it dry so it can float. Well I think that the Mini-14 have a floating pin --I think-- It look to me that is very difficult to take the pin out and clean it. If you do not clean the SKS pin you will have an slam-fire. Can this happen to the Mini-14?. Do I am right on this?, please let me know.
 

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Fine all of you talk about the tricks and lube but I am new to this. On my SKS I have a floating Pin, whitch I keep it dry so it can float. Well I think that the Mini-14 have a floating pin --I think-- It look to me that is very difficult to take the pin out and clean it. If you do not clean the SKS pin you will have an slam-fire. Can this happen to the Mini-14?. Do I am right on this?, please let me know.
Yes, Minis do have floating firing pins. I've been around here for awhile, and haven't heard more than maybe 2 instances of slamfires, and those were due to having a piece of a pierced primer stuck in the firing pin channel.

Theoretically, you're right. Powder residue and dirt could build up and cause a sticky firing pin, which could lead to a slam fire. But I haven't heard of it happening in a Mini-14 or Mini-30.
 

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I am in same boat new 582 series wondered about breaking out the dremel and polishing all that rotates/slides and was wondering about lube. Also thinking about trigger job as well.
I got a 5820 Patrol last year and I polished everything with rubbing compound. Put a bunch of automotive rubbing compound in the action and hand cycled it about 100 times. Then cleaned and greased on all the sliding parts. The trigger was really gritty so I got a ultra fine polishing stone from Midway and ran that over the sears and boy did it make the trigger nice. Gundoc has a great video on DIY trigger job, but the only part I felt comfortable doing was the stoning of the sears and it made a huge difference. Here's the link to his video.
Gunsmithing Videos by Great West Gunsmithing
 

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Ditto on polishing the sears. All I did was put lapping compound on the sears and rub them together to polish them up. I was afraid to screw things up with a stone. Once polished the triggers broke clean, lighter and no more grittiness.
 
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