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Hello all!

I'm a new owner of a 580 series Ruger Mini 14 Tactical. Before purchasing my firearm I took considerable time researching problems associate with the rifle.

The one area where there seemed to be indifference was the folding/collapsible stock for the tactical models... the ATI Strikeforce Stock. People seem to love'em or hate'em. Those that love'em don't deny the fact that there tends to be some degree of wiggle coming from the folding joint and collapsible stock.

Later down the road (considering I just purchased the rifle and an EoTech sight) I will be investing in a SCAR stock. But until then, I took it upon myself to improve the stock and make it fit snugger!

I must say this. I am not an armorer or firearms expert by any means. I have many years of various mechanical/engineering experience. I make no guarantees or promises as to how safe or unsafe it is to modify your firearm or stock in any degree! Any work done to a firearm without first checking with the manufacturer of that firearm and the manufacturer of any of the accessories can be extremely dangerous! I am simply posting what I choose to do on my own in an attempt to modify my firearm for my pleasure. If you choose to look at my documentation of this project as "instructional steps" you are doing so on your own free will and I can not/will not be held responsible for any damage or personal injury or death that may occur to your firearm/property/others/yourself.

Here is how I did it!

ALWAYS MAKE SURE YOUR FIREARMS IS UNLOADED!

First - You must disassemble the stock! If you've never done this before, here is a link to the ATI Strikeforce video by ATI showing how to disassemble the stock Stock Dissasembly

You'll also want to remove the solid pin the stock swivels on. There is a set-screw that is accessible when the stock is folded. I also removed the thumb-button ontop of the pin with a phillips.

ALWAYS MAKE SURE YOUR FIREARMS IS UNLOADED!

Below: I've highlighted the areas you'll need to "work" on to get the piece fitting snug. To the left we see the female-angles of the folding piece are not matched up well with the male-angles of the stock. To the right of that there is a notch on the top of the folding piece that does not line up with the cutout on the stock. And last, the curved right-side of the folding piece does not sit properly in the cutout on the stock. All three of these things makes for an improper/wobbly fit!


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Below: This picture shows how the folding piece fits straight from the factory. As noted above, there are some spots that would need better machining to fit properly.


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Below: The working has begun! I've highlighted the areas that I've worked down. The material is very dense and difficult to work with. I used a utility knife, exacto knife, and sand paper. I suppose a dremel could be used... but I would worry about taking off to much material at a time. Always be careful and wear gloves and eye protection! Make sure you're taking little bits off at a time, reinserting the folding piece, checking for fit, then take off a little more


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Below: Notice how the female-angles on the folding piece have been flanged out more to fit properly with the male-angles of the stock. What I noticed while work is you can not just finish the "angles" section then move on to the "Curve" section on the right of the folding piece. You have to do a little bit of this, then that, then the other to make sure your fit will be tight. Also, because we have three major sections that need working, attempting to completely do one then move to the next is nearly impossible seeing as the other two sections stop the folding piece from sitting properly. Trying to do one section completely at a time may result in removing to much material.


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Below: An un-highlighted pic showing the large amount of material taken from the folding piece. What you're looking at is the stock in the "folded" position. So the large "Worked" area actual sits inside the stock when it's open. This area required the most work to remove material and get a proper fit. Again, work slowly and safely!


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Below: The result! Look at how flush the piece now sits! The material needs to be worked slowly and with care to get a proper flush fit!


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Below: An un-highlighted pic of how the folding piece now fits with the stock after working


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Below: After working the folding piece I tackled the considerable amount of wobble in the collapsible stock.
First-Make sure your stock is reassembled and pull the collapsible stock "out" to its farthest/longest position. Score a mark on the buffer tube for reference later. Notice I highlighted my "Score" mark. It runs perpendicular to the tube.
Second-Score the area that is covered by the stock in criss-cross patterns. This will give the adhesive backing an area to stick to.


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Below: Cut a piece of Velcro (The soft side) and stick it on your scoring. I also rounded the ends to limit the possibility of the edges rolling up inside the tube. Attach the piece and rub it on firmly


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Below: Now, we'll need to "shave" off as much of the soft velcro material as possible! I first used some trimming scissors to snip away as much as I could. I then used my electric razer to shave down even more. I then used the straight edge of some sharp scissors and "scrapped" off more (think of how an ice scraper on a window works, use the same motion). I then used sandpaper to work it down a tad more.
IT'S VERY IMPORTANT TO SHAVE OFF AS MUCH MATERIAL AS POSSIBLE! OR else the tube becomes nearly impossible to adjust! The 2nd to final method of using one straight blade of some sharp scissors and scrapping back and forth seemed to work the best near the end!


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Below: A side shot of how much material was removed. Again get AS MUCH AS YOU CAN OFF OR ELSE YOUR STOCK WILL BE HARD TO MOVE!


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Below: The last bit of play was coming from where the metal swivel pin sits in the bottom end of the stock. It's as if the hole for the pin is a bit to big. The wobble you see at that joint is small, but it translates to about an 1/8th of an inch of wobble at the butt of the stock. So I removed the pin and got it hot with a propane torch. I then went rambo on the bottom end of the pin with a hammer flaring it out. I tried to make the flare as even as I could all around the pin, constantly stopping and checking my work.


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Below: The flare was, of course, to much to fit back in the hole of the stock (This was expected). So I filed all around the flare to make it flat (instead of pointed like the flare was) and allowing it to fit snuggly in the hole. I needed to make sure I was filing evenly and slowly and constantly checking my work. Using a gauge of some sort may be a good idea.



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Below: The last thing I did was stretch out the spring that holds the swivel stock bit in place. I used progressively thicker screwdrivers and ran them up and down the spring to stretch it out a bit. It gave the stock a tighter lock-up feel.


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Below: Stock is reassembled and good to go! I had to play with rotating the pin in the stock a bit so that it gave it the best locking feel when extended. Once you have that position tighten the set-screw and it's done!

I had to remove this image because I was over the limit. But it just shows the stock together
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Final Thoughts: I'm not sure if this will help tighten my groups up nor do I make any promises that it will. My reasoning behind this project was to improve the feel of my rifle. It feels odd to hand somebody something new and excitedly tell them to check it out only to have it rattle and shake in their hands.

I now feel much more confident in my stock. I'll let you know if my groups tighten up any as a result of this modification. I will also keep record of other modifications I plan on doing and their results as time goes on!

Thanks for reading and have fun! :sniper:
 

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Very good write up kraiford12. I may do the same to mine now. I'm anxious to hear if your groups tightened up. Cheers.
 
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