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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was looking at my gun in some detail when I cleaned it last night. I noticed that it appears to have ding marks or indentations at the front around where the gas piston pipe is fitted to the gas block. This appears to be from the slide slamming forward. The slide is a massive part and there is no forgiveness when it homes a round in the chamber. I have no visible wear or marks whatsoever at the back of the slide where the recoil spring slots into the cross bar so I think I'm fine there regarding a buffer block. It won't fit anyway because of the ATI stock.

I would need a thin, fairly hard material of some kind that could take the punishment of the slide hitting it to stop further damage of this. The slide itself looks fine. I should have taken a photo but didn't think of it at the time. The damage is not so bad that it needs to be fixed at this point but if I let this continue it will likely eventually crack the gas block.

I was thinking of using inner tube patch material like for a bycycle or if someone has a better material I would appreciate knowing what it is.
 

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Due to the heat of the gases, most rubber material will not hold up well.

Some guys put 1911 Shock buffs over the gas port at the front. I tried this, and found that it was holding my op-rod just slightly out of battery. As a result, my POI changed by almost 2 inches. I want to try something thinner, and think I am going to go with some thin copper gasket material (like they use for exhaust header gaskets). The copper has some give, and can take the heat also.
 

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There has been a lot of discussion about buffers on here. Some like them others don't. Some use them front and back. I like them, it really calms the slamming action. Do a search on here for buffers, you can read for hours. Some make their own out of leather and other materials. Just keep them thin and make sure the bolt locks completely! Try at your own risk!

Wilson Combat Shok-Buff Recoil Buffer 1911 Government Polyurethane
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would think that the 1911 buffer would have too large a hole for the gas piston tube in the front which is why I was looking for another solution. Maybe the larger hole of the 1911 buffer doesn't matter.

A copper shim sounds like an interesting possibility but it still won't compress much and has little to no give so I don't see very much forgiveness in that. I might help spread out the impact of the pistion slamming the gas block maybe. I considered lead too.
 

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Is something really going to crack? I would think they are better made than that. Ruger has a history of over-engineering their guns?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
i talked with a pretty good gun smith about this and he said I would be dead and gone before that became any sort of problem. I was just worrying for no good reason apparently. I'm going to leave it alone. He was not a fan of buffers either.
 

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I would think that the 1911 buffer would have too large a hole for the gas piston tube in the front which is why I was looking for another solution.
I have a 582-series RR. I put one of the Wilson 1911 buffers on the recoil end of the spring, and sliced one of the buffers half thickness for the gas block end. The hole of the Wilson 1911 buffer was actually too small to fit over the gas tube of my gun, and I had to increase the diameter a bit to get it to fit properly. The gun shoots/funtions/cycles just as it should, but without the "ka-ching" of metal on metal it used to have.

So far, both buffers are holding up ok, but I don't shoot as much as others. But the buffers are cheap, plentiful, and easy to install.
 
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